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250 posts

Master Geek


#115835 8-Apr-2013 20:48
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Hi guys

We are thinking of using the HardieGlaze Lining (tiled look) on our bathroom walls.

Anyone have any experience of using this and can share experience/pics??

The bath and floor will have proper tiles but architect has advised me of the above product for the walls (tiling the walls will be expensive and cleaning the grout a pain).

Thanks

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363 posts

Ultimate Geek

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  #795241 8-Apr-2013 20:59
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Hardiglaze tile and smooth  are both a painted surface on top of fibre cement board (the old fibrolite without the asbestos)
The hardiglaze tile is made from 6mm thick sheet. Common sizes are 2400mm x 1200 or 900mm wide.

Being a painted surface it requires careful cleaning else you will scratch it. In my opinion a glazed tile is much more robust any day. No opinions on the grout cleaning.

Disclosure; I sell hardiglaze and tiles at my workplace.



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Master Geek


  #795258 8-Apr-2013 21:28
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Thanks Wally22.

Can you paint the Hardiglaze?? it doesn't seem to come in any other colours apart from white..

 
 
 
 


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Uber Geek

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  #795262 8-Apr-2013 21:37
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You can buy other products that do different colours, have seen a beige one and a pink one before. I used it in our shower, installed it myself. It was easy to use, and with gif and a soft cloth still looks like the day we bought it. The biggest trouble I had with it was getting the aluminum finishing trim, neither mitre 10 nor Bunnings stocked it standard, had to be a special order.

The key is only using it in areas a single sheet will cover. If you had to use multiple sheets with the join I think it looks cheap..

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  #795267 8-Apr-2013 21:42
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You would need to look at the product specs, but I think you can paint most surfaces, and you can buy tile paint for normal tiles. But it can scratch off. However I don't think it is really designed to be painted, and I think it is mainly used for shwerwall linings, which people want white. If people want colours they would be best to use tiles.
The big problem with that sort of product is the joints between sheets, and can look bad if not done well.
You can probably get better grout these days which is easier to clean?

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  #795301 8-Apr-2013 22:46
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Hardiglaze is white only AFAIK. There are several new tile patterns available recently too, I don't know if they continued with them, no demand? You don't use jointers with Hardiglaze tile, you use GROUT! Some cowboys still insist on using jointers, destroying the "tile" look.

Seratone (a hardboard backing with a similar painted finish to Hardiglaze) comes in a wide range of colours and the magnitide of different trims means it is impractical to stock them all.

There is a cheaper product, Showerline from IBS. It is a plastc core, with painted aluminium cladding. It is lighter and easier to handle, but seems to scratch a little easier.

(added comment) A house I had in Karori was fitted with Formica. Definitely more robust and superior finish to the above products.

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  #795305 8-Apr-2013 23:15
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My impression is that it never really looks like real tiles, and it is used more as a cheaper option than using real tiles. Have seen it used in rentals quite a bit, and behind baths/showers. I think it is similar to the seretone product, but with a tiled texture to it.



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Master Geek


  #798201 12-Apr-2013 08:29
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Hi

Does anyone know if the silicon area exposed to the water (behind shower over bath) changes colour over time? That mouldy look..


 
 
 
 


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Uber Geek


  #798219 12-Apr-2013 09:01
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mailmarshall: Hi

Does anyone know if the silicon area exposed to the water (behind shower over bath) changes colour over time? That mouldy look..


It shouldn't do if installed properly. I've never had any problems with silicone in the couple of shower relines I have done.
Tip from my plumber re smoothing silicone after install - NEVER lick your finger and use it to smooth the silicon bead. Bacteria from your mouth will cause instant mould growth. Similarly don't wet finger in water and smooth the silicon due to bacteria on finger. Always use latex or vinyl sterile gloves or an appropriate tool to smooth out the silicon.

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  #798238 12-Apr-2013 09:38
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mailmarshall: Hi

Does anyone know if the silicon area exposed to the water (behind shower over bath) changes colour over time? That mouldy look..



If installed correctly it will not.  Like anything in a shower it gets dirty over time, however with a bleach spray ours comes back to perfect white.

You don't use jointers with Hardiglaze tile, you use GROUT!
 

I most certainly would not advocate, this with surface preping for tile (water membranes) not required with Hardiglaze.  When I was installing (granted a few years ago) this was not an option for joining boards.  The only other option is to use silicon to join, this still does not look quite right as it wont match the other lines. when flat, on corner joins a silicon line is a very tidy solution. 

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  #798458 12-Apr-2013 15:29
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mailmarshall: Thanks Wally22.

Can you paint the Hardiglaze?? it doesn't seem to come in any other colours apart from white..

I wouldn't recommend painting.

Have you looked at their online brochures? Lots of info there.
http://www.jameshardie.co.nz/index.php/page/brochures/pi_productid/24


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  #798467 12-Apr-2013 15:40
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Isn't it better to use proper joiners that have a built in 'drain' in them, ratehr than silicon. Sure it doesn't look as good, but sealants eventually fail and leak, and capillary action will draw in water into the crack. Not unless you have a waterproof membrane in behind the sheets.

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