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Topic # 151971 11-Sep-2014 18:02
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Hey guys,
I'm planning on using some 12v strip LED lighting for a tradeshow that is coming up. Will use it to backlight some signs to put on the booth wall. I think we will end up with probably about 10metres so at 14.4watt per metre will need a 200watt supply.

Now the problem is while I can fine transformers, I'm worried they are going to be dangerous with the AC input. E.g. this one which is $90 on Trademe:


Requires the AC to be screwed down. If it get's knocked or kicked there could be live AC wires hanging around. I could do the budget old computer PSU trick but its probably not that great. Anyone with other ideas?





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Vocus

  Reply # 1126674 11-Sep-2014 18:04
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Have you looked into renting the required lighting?  It may be safer / cheaper / easier than a DIY job.

edit: I know a guy who does staging etc who could probably organise a quote or point you in the right direction, if you are interested.



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  Reply # 1126680 11-Sep-2014 18:13
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Yea sure that could be another option. The signs kind of need the LED strip to be applied beforehand so could just leave like a DC female jack on each sign? Then he could organise all the power?

The tradeshow is in Christchurch. What do you think it would cost?





 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1126681 11-Sep-2014 18:14
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What LED strips are you using? We had 5M LED strips and they only used 2.5A so 2 of these could easily run off one of these
http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=MP3575&w=12v+7%2E5a&form=KEYWORD

Also depending on the LED's you may need to put them in parallel where as some will be fine in series.




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Vocus

  Reply # 1126683 11-Sep-2014 18:15
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Well this guy is Auckland based, and would probably provide lighting with matched power rather than just power for already built lighting.

have you considered just using several plug packs and a multiboard?  Seems like that'd be fairly safe.  Even 12v at 200W has potential to start a decent fire if something shorts out.

edit: or just get a sparky to install fluorescent tubes :) probably a lot cheaper...

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  Reply # 1126688 11-Sep-2014 18:30
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However if you want to stick with those LED strips get 2 of the power supplies I listed above and power 5m in one and and the other 5m in the other.

Far safer and about the same price as the 480w power supply you listed.




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  Reply # 1126794 11-Sep-2014 21:21
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i would use a PC power supply.
most decent ones will do 20A+ on the 12v line and have a fan  in them etc.
simply put a few fuses on the output lines (even just using car fuses with spade terminals to connect them...pretty easy.
I use a PC power supply to power my RC car charger and as a general benchtop supply.

just dont use a cheap hyena or simalrly cheap nasty powre supply... i like the silverstone P/S's

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  Reply # 1126813 11-Sep-2014 21:50
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I would be surprised if you can install something that isn't certified by a professional. What if it causes a fire or people get electrocuted. I would hire something to be safe.

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  Reply # 1126854 11-Sep-2014 22:42
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I vote the PC power supply. The type you have listed are intended for installation in another enclosure. That is why they have the exposed mains terminals. But thanks for posting that. I will probably buy one for myself to replace this power supply.


It was originally designed to output 50V to charge telephone exchange backup batteries. It now outputs 12V (with a simple mod). And I now use it to charge the backup battery for my router, Wifi AP ect. Considering replacing it because of how old it is.





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  Reply # 1126869 11-Sep-2014 23:12
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If the show is at Horncastle arena (ex CBS, Westpac) then bear in mind they had a fire from a spa pool at a tradeshow earlier in the year, so might apply greater scrutiny to your electrical gear than they would have otherwise

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  Reply # 1126871 11-Sep-2014 23:31
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nickb800: If the show is at Horncastle arena (ex CBS, Westpac) then bear in mind they had a fire from a spa pool at a tradeshow earlier in the year, so might apply greater scrutiny to your electrical gear than they would have otherwise

 

With all the red tape these days, I would be surprised if they would allow anything to be used which isn't certified by an electrician. Would likely affect their insurance cover too.

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  Reply # 1127880 13-Sep-2014 15:10
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a PC power supply is the best solution.
1) plugs in with a standard appliance cord
2)Can supply loads of 12V current
3)No exposed mains terminals or home brew casing
4) fan cooled and inbuilt overload protection
5)easily add in line fuses on the outputs to feed the various LED circuits.

SLC

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  Reply # 1145641 2-Oct-2014 14:34
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Not sure if you are still looking for these
depending on the expo - some of them crack a wobbly if you dont have certified power supplies - and that type of open frame unit would never get certed for a show

you could go to a plug-in type supply similar to one of these (sorry - cant post links - but if you still need it PM me) .  already SDoc certified and plug n go option using a female socket on the end of your strips (wholesale pricing available)

only downside is you would need to share the load over 3 of them to get away with a simple 3.5mm socket

we have fitted these in several display stands using modules to backlight acrylic - nice and safe and easy

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  Reply # 1147409 4-Oct-2014 22:09
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extra low voltage does not have to be certified by an electrician.
Thats why a PC power supply is your best option. all the 240 is contained and fed via a normal appliance lead. Theres no hacking or custom stuff that involves the 240v side of things.
 1  ELV circuit fed with 4mm2 garden light wiring is all your going to need. put about a 15 or 20A fuse on the ELV side for any shorts. if you need connectors use 30A+ deans or anderson connectors.
 a setup like that would take less than an hour to sort.

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