Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


312 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 73


Topic # 159907 16-Dec-2014 19:49
Send private message

So I moved into a new rental in Johnsonville, Wellington about 4 months ago. Towards the end of winter. It has a triangle shaped roof with no insulation, very thin ceiling with a tin roof. So there is little space between the inside of the ceiling and the outside air. It was surprisingly warm compared to our last house in winter. It has a heat pump downstairs. All has been well until the temperature has started to rise. Upstairs in my man cave where I spend most of my time the heat is becoming unbearable. I am running a fan all day. The ceiling is conducting the heat. It is hot to touch, not warm, hot! Today was the worst, and its only the beginning of summer.

Today I ran the heat pump on cool downstairs with the windows closed and it was bliss.

Couple of questions. Does anybody use their heat pump as a air conditioner often? What does it do to your power bill? Secondly, can I run a second unit upstairs off of the original pump, 2 units off one pump. Hopefully the ducting can go far enough. Estimates of cost on a second unit? 


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
4433 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2434

Trusted

  Reply # 1198620 16-Dec-2014 19:51
One person supports this post
Send private message

Some systems are designed to have one outside unit, two inside units. Unless the existing one has this design, then I don't think you can simply add an inside unit in.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


Aussie
4237 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1208

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1198621 16-Dec-2014 19:53
Send private message

In Australia they're called "split-system air conditioners" and hardly anyone uses them for heat.
I'll let you know about about power bill next month as we've just had a big panasonic unit installed 6 months ago. From what I remember of my research, they do use more power cooling than heating. Depends on the unit tho.

Most units are designed for one indoor unit only. You can buy systems with 2 or more, but they're designed for that. Edit: DarthKermit types faster than me :)


27072 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6513

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1198623 16-Dec-2014 20:08
Send private message

Multiple units can be fitted off a single outdoor compressor but it's highly unlikely you'll have a compressor that's big enough for this - it's something you'd do during the install phase if they were required.


14152 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2546

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1198628 16-Dec-2014 20:20
Send private message

Unlikely, the units that can support multiple indoor units are twice the price. If you can't get the landlord to insulate or provide a heat pump probably best to move - and make sure the landlord knows why you're moving.

I don't know what my air con costs to run, I don't use it that much, house is pretty well insulated here (also JV). However the sun puts out a lot of heat and without insulation a lot will come inside, so to remove it could cost a lot.




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer




312 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 73


  Reply # 1198639 16-Dec-2014 20:39
Send private message

what about a sun reflecting paint? I know they exist, but not sure if its realistic for residential use. 

1687 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 401

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1198666 16-Dec-2014 21:04
Send private message

We found heating in winter was just more than half the cost of cooling in summer in a well-insulated but very sunny room. Your heating bill with an uninsulated ceiling and metal roof would have been high so it might be a similar ratio for you in summer.

Aussie
4237 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1208

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1198732 16-Dec-2014 22:40
Send private message

sbiddle: Multiple units can be fitted off a single outdoor compressor but it's highly unlikely you'll have a compressor that's big enough for this - it's something you'd do during the install phase if they were required.



Exactly! This is mine... and only designed for 1 indoor unit. (the mess is from the old unit)


7752 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2559

Subscriber

  Reply # 1198767 17-Dec-2014 05:40
Send private message

why not insulate the ceiling?



312 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 73


  Reply # 1198771 17-Dec-2014 05:54
Send private message

It's a rental, and the design of the ceiling won't allow for it. Unless they build a extra layer over top of the existing ceiling. I don't see the landlord wanting to do build work.

14152 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2546

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1198810 17-Dec-2014 07:54
Send private message

blakamin:
sbiddle: Multiple units can be fitted off a single outdoor compressor but it's highly unlikely you'll have a compressor that's big enough for this - it's something you'd do during the install phase if they were required.



Exactly! This is mine... and only designed for 1 indoor unit. (the mess is from the old unit)



That's a heck of an outdoor unit. I was thinking a double unit like that around 20kw might be enough for a central heating type unit at my place - not that I'll likely ever get to do it, too expensive.




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


7878 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 790

Subscriber

  Reply # 1198848 17-Dec-2014 09:08
Send private message

Scotty1986: So I moved into a new rental in Johnsonville, Wellington about 4 months ago. Towards the end of winter. It has a triangle shaped roof with no insulation, very thin ceiling with a tin roof. So there is little space between the inside of the ceiling and the outside air. It was surprisingly warm compared to our last house in winter. It has a heat pump downstairs. All has been well until the temperature has started to rise. Upstairs in my man cave where I spend most of my time the heat is becoming unbearable. I am running a fan all day. The ceiling is conducting the heat. It is hot to touch, not warm, hot! Today was the worst, and its only the beginning of summer.

Today I ran the heat pump on cool downstairs with the windows closed and it was bliss.

Couple of questions. Does anybody use their heat pump as a air conditioner often? What does it do to your power bill? Secondly, can I run a second unit upstairs off of the original pump, 2 units off one pump. Hopefully the ducting can go far enough. Estimates of cost on a second unit? 



We use ours all the time in the summer as an aircon.  In fact in the user manual (fujitsu)  it never mentions the word "Heatpump"  only Air Conditioner so I suspect that the term heatpump is a local most likely australian  name for it..  Like Ute for pickup truck..




Regards,

Old3eyes


14152 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2546

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1198852 17-Dec-2014 09:13
Send private message

Mildly interesting point Fujitsu's Nocria is "aircon" spelled backwards - AFAIK it's optimised for heating as NZ typically needs heaters far more than air conditioners.




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


240 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 51


  Reply # 1198884 17-Dec-2014 10:11
Send private message

There is specific types of insulation you can get for that type of roof (skillion).
May need a builder involved to confrm the thickness allowed, as there are air gaps required.
Other challenge is installation, basically involves either removing the ceiling or roofing to install.

2091 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 848


  Reply # 1198943 17-Dec-2014 11:01
Send private message

Cost depends on a bunch of factors (size of room, airflow, age and model of heatpump etc) - I'd suggest using it for a week around the end of the month and then extrapolating.

If you've got a smart meter you should be able to see daily usage online with your power provider.

We use our heatpump to cool in summer, but not every day - cost does add up. We used it almost constantly through winter for heating and it was roughly $1 a day or so.

Aussie
4237 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1208

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1199494 17-Dec-2014 20:11
Send private message

timmmay:
blakamin:
sbiddle: Multiple units can be fitted off a single outdoor compressor but it's highly unlikely you'll have a compressor that's big enough for this - it's something you'd do during the install phase if they were required.



Exactly! This is mine... and only designed for 1 indoor unit. (the mess is from the old unit)



That's a heck of an outdoor unit. I was thinking a double unit like that around 20kw might be enough for a central heating type unit at my place - not that I'll likely ever get to do it, too expensive.

Biggest domestic unit we could find at the time... :)
When you have 5 days over 42° like we did last year, you want big.
It just idles along quite nicely at 40°, so we'll see how she goes in summer.

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.