Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


172 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 47


Topic # 165531 12-Feb-2015 14:39
Send private message

so we purchased an empty section in south auckland, with a view to moving a house on. to get title issued, the vendor had to supply a vehicle crossing to the site. 

at the time of purchase we only had an approximate idea of where the house would sit on site - somewhere on the east side of the property.

the vendor, just wanting to get the title issued and move on, installed a new 6 x 4 (ie quite large) exposed aggregate (ie quite expensive) crossing on the north side, from the road to the boundary.

thats fair enough we thought, we werent too worried - could just use it as alternate access to the rear of the property, or just fence across it and leave it redundant

so we move the house on to site, and prep for the new driveway / garage / parking pad to the east side of the property

now AT come to inspect the new eastern vehicle crossing, and tell us they wont issue consent until the northen crossing is pulled up, the footpath replaced, and the kerb reinstated ...

seem ridiculous that they want this brand new crossing removed. its not like we intended to have dual driveways, it was there when we purchased the site and had no influence on the positioning of our house on the *council approved* site plan . cant even just block it off - has to be removed

worth escalating? 



Create new topic
14213 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2570

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1236610 12-Feb-2015 14:42
One person supports this post
Send private message

AT?




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


3210 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 917

Trusted

  Reply # 1236664 12-Feb-2015 15:34
Send private message

timmmay: AT?


Auckland Transport

Hmm, what to write...
998 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 506

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1236698 12-Feb-2015 16:42
Send private message

greenbone: so we purchased an empty section in south auckland, with a view to moving a house on. to get title issued, the vendor had to supply a vehicle crossing to the site. 

at the time of purchase we only had an approximate idea of where the house would sit on site - somewhere on the east side of the property.

the vendor, just wanting to get the title issued and move on, installed a new 6 x 4 (ie quite large) exposed aggregate (ie quite expensive) crossing on the north side, from the road to the boundary.

thats fair enough we thought, we werent too worried - could just use it as alternate access to the rear of the property, or just fence across it and leave it redundant

so we move the house on to site, and prep for the new driveway / garage / parking pad to the east side of the property

now AT come to inspect the new eastern vehicle crossing, and tell us they wont issue consent until the northen crossing is pulled up, the footpath replaced, and the kerb reinstated ...

seem ridiculous that they want this brand new crossing removed. its not like we intended to have dual driveways, it was there when we purchased the site and had no influence on the positioning of our house on the *council approved* site plan . cant even just block it off - has to be removed

worth escalating? 




So I assume the plans for the building consent you already have already had the new crossing on the plan?

and Auckland transport are just now looking at the proposed crossing because it doesn't form part of the building consent... Have I got this right?

or have you already got the new crossing?




Matthew


3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 1236783 12-Feb-2015 20:05
One person supports this post
Send private message

What you experience is correct, you need to remove the original one and re-instate the footpath and plant the grass mix they specify.  But this all should already have been covered by the building consent, was it not?  The reason for completely removing the old crossing is partly because it ensures you do not add a second dwelling with its own entrance while registering it as a single dwelling site, or so I'm told.  IMO it generates income and adds red tape, never mind the waste it generates.

We built a new house in Pakuranga (East Auckland) on a section which already had a small house, then removed the small house.  The new house layout meant we wanted the driveway and crossing on the other end of the section.  The council required us to do all the above, not just reinstate the footpath.  And note the curb stones are really expensive.  Make sure you do it exactly as they say, and some/most of the work must be done by people approved/certified to do footpaths/crossings.  It is not worth getting it wrong, you're dealing with Council/AT.  We even had to get resource consent (and plant a specimen tree, which may be periodically inspected at our cost...) to evaluate the impact on the neighbours for having 2 houses on one section for 9 months and increased traffic.  Many neighbours did not even know we built until the old house was removed...  No wonder there is not enough houses built fast enough.




You can never have enough Volvos!


4480 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2476

Trusted

  Reply # 1236906 13-Feb-2015 03:07
One person supports this post
Send private message

Niel: What you experience is correct, you need to remove the original one and re-instate the footpath and plant the grass mix they specify.  But this all should already have been covered by the building consent, was it not?  The reason for completely removing the old crossing is partly because it ensures you do not add a second dwelling with its own entrance while registering it as a single dwelling site, or so I'm told.  IMO it generates income and adds red tape, never mind the waste it generates.

We built a new house in Pakuranga (East Auckland) on a section which already had a small house, then removed the small house.  The new house layout meant we wanted the driveway and crossing on the other end of the section.  The council required us to do all the above, not just reinstate the footpath.  And note the curb stones are really expensive.  Make sure you do it exactly as they say, and some/most of the work must be done by people approved/certified to do footpaths/crossings.  It is not worth getting it wrong, you're dealing with Council/AT.  We even had to get resource consent (and plant a specimen tree, which may be periodically inspected at our cost...) to evaluate the impact on the neighbours for having 2 houses on one section for 9 months and increased traffic.  Many neighbours did not even know we built until the old house was removed...  No wonder there is not enough houses built fast enough.


To be fair, it keeps a lot of pencil pushers in jobs. tongue-out




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 1236910 13-Feb-2015 06:53
Send private message

And because you are not allowed to use reinforced concrete, if you move a house you will damage the footpath/crossing and you will have to repair it and have it inspected.  The house moving company probably would have arranged that for the OP (except repairs).

Digressing a bit, but you know if you subdivide a section (add a housing unit) there is a development fee you pay to the council.  It is a few thousand dollars to pay for increased requirements for libraries, parks, services, etc.  With the high number of houses built in Auckland (and other areas), how come library hours are being reduced?  In an established area, how can the council add more parks?  When do services get upgraded (i.e. water pipe size increased)?  Though the bill we pay Water Care pays for that.  Rates pay for the extra rubbish removal.  Bus fares pay for extra busses.  And if we don't have money for roading, how come we are intensifying housing?

Hope you get somewhere on the crossing issue, hopefully find the council made a mistake in approval without telling you about the crossing removal, but sorry I'm not optimistic.




You can never have enough Volvos!


1710 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 169

Trusted

  Reply # 1237146 13-Feb-2015 11:04
Send private message

Niel: And because you are not allowed to use reinforced concrete, if you move a house you will damage the footpath/crossing and you will have to repair it and have it inspected.  The house moving company probably would have arranged that for the OP (except repairs).

Digressing a bit, but you know if you subdivide a section (add a housing unit) there is a development fee you pay to the council.  It is a few thousand dollars to pay for increased requirements for libraries, parks, services, etc.  With the high number of houses built in Auckland (and other areas), how come library hours are being reduced?  In an established area, how can the council add more parks?  When do services get upgraded (i.e. water pipe size increased)?  Though the bill we pay Water Care pays for that.  Rates pay for the extra rubbish removal.  Bus fares pay for extra busses.  And if we don't have money for roading, how come we are intensifying housing?

Hope you get somewhere on the crossing issue, hopefully find the council made a mistake in approval without telling you about the crossing removal, but sorry I'm not optimistic.



I'm pretty sure councils up and down the country spend those development fees there and then on their pet projects, and then when they do upgrade or replace services they increase rates and/or take on debt to cover those costs.



172 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 47


  Reply # 1239932 16-Feb-2015 12:36
Send private message

thanks for the replies

yes the new crossing was shown on the plans, but not really a concern for AT as theyre only interested in signing off the crossing, not the site as a whole

having to remove the existing crossing will be a disaster - im in civil for work - just the costs of traffic management for 2 days are ridiculous, let alone extraction and tipping of reinforced concrete, new kerb installtion etc



4480 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2476

Trusted

  Reply # 1239981 16-Feb-2015 13:01
Send private message

That's the trouble with natural monopolies like councils. They have you by the balls and have no incentive to contain their costs and their charges.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


21533 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4387

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1239985 16-Feb-2015 13:10
Send private message

Do you even need a crossing? See plenty around here where people just drive over the verge and have dumped gravel down.




Richard rich.ms

606 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 63

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1240002 16-Feb-2015 13:25
Send private message

I sold off a back section in Napier that opened off to a side street.

I used a surveyor do all the processing and he organised a deferment with the council of the crossing construction until after the purchaser completed building construction.








Gordy




172 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 47


  Reply # 1242015 18-Feb-2015 21:46
Send private message

good news - replied to the AT inspectors email, basically asking "can we just keep it please?"

he replied today saying he spoke to his boss, and we can keep it ... just need to sign off the new crossing now

thats a huge amount of time and money saved, im pretty glad it was resolved so neatly



1710 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 169

Trusted

  Reply # 1242160 19-Feb-2015 10:52
Send private message

greenbone: good news - replied to the AT inspectors email, basically asking "can we just keep it please?"

he replied today saying he spoke to his boss, and we can keep it ... just need to sign off the new crossing now

thats a huge amount of time and money saved, im pretty glad it was resolved so neatly




That is awesome news - congratulations!

Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.