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Topic # 184044 8-Nov-2015 12:17
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Has anyone ever done a renovation on an original lockwood home? Moving walls etc? Plumbing? 

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  Reply # 1426685 12-Nov-2015 08:09
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Welp, I now own one, so will be figuring this out as I go. If anyone stumbles on this in the future then i'll probably have some of it worked out. 

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  Reply # 1426687 12-Nov-2015 08:14
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Good luck to you.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1426711 12-Nov-2015 08:31
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Disrespective, we own an original 80's Lockwood. Its a great house!

We haven't looked at major renovations though so not much I can answer on that one. The extent of our "renos" so far are tiling, carpeting, under floor insulation and at one stage I sanded/re-varnished the roof of the bathroom.

Not sure what type of plugs/light switches you have but many of ours failed (old age?) so I've replaced many of them with new ones.

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  Reply # 1426713 12-Nov-2015 08:34
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I own one but have only done major work outside and modular stuff inside like kitchen and bath room. These are constructed from the floor up with wall slotting in the roof is the final thing to go on. Removing walls is totally different to conventional homes and is going to be expensive.




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  Reply # 1426715 12-Nov-2015 08:38
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I'm intrigued to read of an architect purchasing a Lockwood home; what encouraged you to do this?



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  Reply # 1426775 12-Nov-2015 10:25
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MikeB4: I own one but have only done major work outside and modular stuff inside like kitchen and bath room. These are constructed from the floor up with wall slotting in the roof is the final thing to go on. Removing walls is totally different to conventional homes and is going to be expensive.
Why would removing walls be expensive? Admittedly the only ones I am looking to remove aren't load bearing, but aside from the small clips holding the walls perpendicular to each other i'm not anticipating trouble. 



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  Reply # 1426777 12-Nov-2015 10:31
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jonathan18: I'm intrigued to read of an architect purchasing a Lockwood home; what encouraged you to do this?
It was cheap-ish (because they are polarising homes) on a great level entry, N-NW facing elevated site in/near an area we like... And it's small (I like small homes, no point rattling around) with some room to extend and add value when we need it. 

Plus, a home with a bit of character is nice. I have no interest in owning a home which is all white gib walls. We'll see how well I do living with the apparently noisy nature of the lockwood system... I suspect it's never been tightened (or certainly not in the last 30 years) which should be done every year from what lockwood tell me so that might make some difference. 

All the other issues (damp, cold) can be minimised by doing the things we would do to any other home anyway (heatpump, insulation).



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  Reply # 1426784 12-Nov-2015 10:42
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Disrespective:
MikeB4: I own one but have only done major work outside and modular stuff inside like kitchen and bath room. These are constructed from the floor up with wall slotting in the roof is the final thing to go on. Removing walls is totally different to conventional homes and is going to be expensive.
Why would removing walls be expensive? Admittedly the only ones I am looking to remove aren't load bearing, but aside from the small clips holding the walls perpendicular to each other i'm not anticipating trouble. 


I am not a builder or even a home handy man. I can break things very well though :)

I was told by two different contractors doing work here that removing walls in Lockwoods is tricky due to the timber and construction method. We were considering removing a wall between our kitchen/dinning room and the lounge
to make one large open plan room but were told the roof would need to be lifted to do it properly and to re-route services. Its not a load bearer that is generally done by the centre beam and side beams.
I took their word on it and have never pursued it further. If it is not the case then we could revisit so I would love to comment buy  builders here




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1426796 12-Nov-2015 11:23
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In a lockwood, are there are metal rods running down the inside of the walls (to tighten them down?).

We have an Initial Home (a Lockwood company) It doesn't have the wooden ceilings. It does have the built from the bottom up walls, and I know there are metal rods in the outside walls (luckily when I dug the hole for a rangehood extraction pipe I got the hole exactly in between two rods). I don't know if these rods are in the internal walls though (have drilled a couple of holes right through, but only small and not struck metal).

They are a bit of a pain for running cables - there is no internal cavity in the walls. But the house is warm and comfortable, and we do not notice the creaking or cracking any more.

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  Reply # 1426800 12-Nov-2015 11:28
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"I suspect it's never been tightened (or certainly not in the last 30 years) which should be done every year from what lockwood tell me so that might make some difference"

I have lived in a 1975-vintage Lockwood for the last fifteen years and this is the first I've ever heard of "tightening", let alone doing it every year!
So, what is it that I have omitted to do?

What is this "tightening", how do you do it?

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  Reply # 1426801 12-Nov-2015 11:33
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PolicyGuy: "I suspect it's never been tightened (or certainly not in the last 30 years) which should be done every year from what lockwood tell me so that might make some difference"

I have lived in a 1975-vintage Lockwood for the last fifteen years and this is the first I've ever heard of "tightening", let alone doing it every year!
So, what is it that I have omitted to do?

What is this "tightening", how do you do it?


how on earth would you do the tightening? lift the roof, climb under the house?  I doubt ours has ever been done




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1426802 12-Nov-2015 11:34
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Disrespective: We'll see how well I do living with the apparently noisy nature of the lockwood system... I suspect it's never been tightened (or certainly not in the last 30 years) which should be done every year from what lockwood tell me so that might make some difference. 

All the other issues (damp, cold) can be minimised by doing the things we would do to any other home anyway (heatpump, insulation).



Ours is small too ~90m2 but apart from one bedroom the rooms are really big (Lockwood dont waste space).

We don't even notice the house settling at night any more. It does give unsuspecting visitors a good fright sometimes though.

In terms of heating we have a wood burner in the lounge which heats up the house nicely. It would be nice to duct the hot air to the other side of the house though - this BTW is where the small room is which does suffer a bit from cold/damp but we are careful to run a dehumidifier and heater in there during winter (the small room is cheap to heat). As a stop gap for air transfer I bought a USB powered computer fan that I set up above the fireplace. Its quiet (brushless), pushes the warm down the hall way and helps with condensation. I run it off a USB battery pack (lasts overnight).



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  Reply # 1426803 12-Nov-2015 11:34
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  Reply # 1426805 12-Nov-2015 11:35
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MikeB4: how on earth would you do the tightening? lift the roof, climb under the house?  I doubt ours has ever been done


Ours has never been tightened and we've owned it for 9+ years.

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  Reply # 1426808 12-Nov-2015 11:39
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ubergeeknz: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgU4JUEbmKA


That video shows the rubber dampeners between the wood. I believe this is not in the original Lockwood which would lead me to believe the tie rods are not in older Lockwoods either.

Certainly there is no (sufficient) gap between my roof ceiling wood and the long run sheets that could accommodate a nut, spring or anything shown in that video.

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