Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

Topic # 191104 23-Jan-2016 18:33
Send private message

I'm looking at buying a particular house and if I do, I'll need a carport. I was wondering if anyone had built something like this before and had a ballpark on the price so I can plug it into my budgeting spreadsheet... 

 

 

 

 

The existing wall is brick over timber framing so I would attach it to the wall but also have verticals on the wall side (not shown in pic). For the roof I'd probably go with simple coloured corrugated iron or zincalume. I'd concrete steel stirrups in for the external posts. 

 

Dimensions would be about 3*6m (So it's under the 20m2 and therefore doesn't require a permit)

 

Oh - no floor required. It's on a compacted gravel surface already.

 

Happy and capable to do the work myself but curious as to the all up cost of the bits if someone has done it before, and if you've paid someone to do it, what did that cost?

 

 

 

CHeers - N

 

 


Create new topic
2522 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 937

Subscriber

  Reply # 1477462 23-Jan-2016 19:47
Send private message

We did a roughly 5mx3m carport at a family members place last year, believe they paid about $2k for the base kit. The kit was a Formsteel one, but I believe they bought it through either Mitre10 or Bunnings. Was more basic than your pitcture - no trellised sidewalls etc. Just a fairly basic steel (or similar) four posts and a roof type thing. So not sure if that helps.





Windows 7 x64 // i5-3570K // 16GB DDR3-1600 // GTX660Ti 2GB // Samsung 830 120GB SSD // OCZ Agility4 120GB SSD // Samsung U28D590D @ 3840x2160 & Asus PB278Q @ 2560x1440
Samsung Galaxy S5 SM-G900I w/Spark

1797 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 120


  Reply # 1478620 25-Jan-2016 21:39
Send private message

Be aware that in your pic you'll have to flash in the roof to the wall cladding, which can add some complexity to the DIY nature of the work. As for cost i'd just tally up how much timber I was going to use and then price it accordingly from a supplier.




3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1478623 25-Jan-2016 21:43
Send private message

Disrespective:

 

Be aware that in your pic you'll have to flash in the roof to the wall cladding, which can add some complexity to the DIY nature of the work. As for cost i'd just tally up how much timber I was going to use and then price it accordingly from a supplier.

 

 

 

 

I just nicked that pic from the internets - in reality the roof would be immediately (15-20cm) under the eaves (which themselves are I guess about 30-40cm). Is the flashing you speak of a code requirement or a practical measure to stop water ingress at that join? (Because in the real world situation I'm confident that the water ingress wouldn't happen even without any flashing)

 

Thanks for the thought though.

 

Cheers - N


14353 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1866


  Reply # 1478640 25-Jan-2016 21:59
Send private message

You will probably find it cheaper and simplier to do it as a stand alone garage. You won't be able to connect it to brick, as you would need to tie it to the timber frame for bracing and you may need more bracing,as brick isn't structural. The council will probably need a producer statement from an engineer.



3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1478644 25-Jan-2016 22:10
Send private message

I had thought of that (and know the brick's not structural...) .. "The existing wall is brick over timber framing so I would attach it to the wall but also have verticals on the wall side (not shown in pic)"

 

 

 

Having it "attached" to the dwelling exempts it from needing a building consent. It would be effectively standalone but touching the existing dwelling. A standalone small building (10m2 or less) still needs a building consent if it's going to be closer to the property boundary than it's own height. The Carport doesn't have such a restriction from what I can see.

 

The actual location (if my offer is accepted) is this

 

 

from the garage to about the downpipe. The big window covered will be a workshop and the small window is just a toilet window.

 

 

 

Cheers - N

 

 




3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1478645 25-Jan-2016 22:18
Send private message

I priced up the cost of the materials and it's about $700 with the correct treated timber, concrete, steel legs, iron and nails etc... Well worth it I think for my requirements.

 

It does seem that there are also a number of lighter weight options available for $1600-$2000 as kitsets and I'd still need to make concrete pads or foundations for them.

 

 

 

Cheers - N


270 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 37

Trusted

  Reply # 1478654 25-Jan-2016 22:51
Send private message

Talkiet:

 

I priced up the cost of the materials and it's about $700 with the correct treated timber, concrete, steel legs, iron and nails etc... Well worth it I think for my requirements.

 

It does seem that there are also a number of lighter weight options available for $1600-$2000 as kitsets and I'd still need to make concrete pads or foundations for them.

 

 

 

Cheers - N

 

 

 

 

Also, bear in mind:

 

 

 

1. Proximity to the boundary may be an issue, the Council will be able to advise further on this.

 

2. Loss of natural light into the rooms where the windows are.

 

3. Water run off from the roof of the carport may need to be diverted to a storm water system.





Michael Skyrme - Instrumentation & Controls



3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1478657 25-Jan-2016 22:56
Send private message

Have thought of all those. Boundary proximity MIGHT be an issue but it won't be closer that the garage wall and it's basically fence height a metre inside the property... Loss of natural light to these rooms not an issue plus I could fit UV cut clear corrugated roofing... Water run off definitely to be considered - I could easily run a pipe to the downpipe you can see in the photo... COuld also rotate the slope 90 degrees to it slopes down from the garage towards the camera.

 

But yep - the prox is something I would have to check. I think it would be ok since in all the other parts of the MBIE guidance document all the other structures make specific mention if boundary proximity is a factor but carports doesn't.

 

It does talk about considering fire risk but the fence is made of the same material! :-)

 

 

 

Cheers - N

 

 


261 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 34

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1478658 25-Jan-2016 22:59
Send private message

If you attach any structure to an external wall I believe you will need to get it permitted. You will be penetrating the envelope that prevents water getting into the house.




3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1478660 25-Jan-2016 23:02
Send private message

wally22:

 

If you attach any structure to an external wall I believe you will need to get it permitted. You will be penetrating the envelope that prevents water getting into the house.

 

 

http://www.building.govt.nz/userfiles/file/publications/building/guidance-information/pdf/building-work-consent-not-required-guidance-3rd-edition.pdf

 

Page 52

 

In part:

 

"Building work in connection with a carport that:

 

(a) is on or attached to an existing building; and

 

(b) is on the ground level of the building; and

 

(c) does not exceed 20 square metres in floor area.

 

This exemption relates to roofed structures that are used for motor vehicle storage and that are on or attached to an existing building. To be regarded as a carport, at least one side of the structure must remain open to the outdoors at all times.

 

The floor area, which is taken to be the area within the posts and/or walls supporting the roof structure, must also be no greater than 20 square metres to qualify for this exemption.

 

This exemption also includes all work relating to the disposal of stormwater as it relates to the carport."


261 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 34

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1478676 25-Jan-2016 23:53
Send private message

I stand corrected.


2026 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 340

Trusted

  Reply # 1478709 26-Jan-2016 07:53
Send private message

You mentioned running the spouting into the downpipe in the photo - from what I can see that is a vent for your sewage. Yes you can feed water down it, and yes the water will be taken away, but I highly doubt that it would be code compliant - it should go into stormwater.

 

I don't mean to be a stickler, and don't mean to judge you if you do intend on circumventing code - just giving a heads up. 




3712 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2253

Trusted
Spark NZ

  Reply # 1478713 26-Jan-2016 08:12
Send private message

nickb800:

 

You mentioned running the spouting into the downpipe in the photo - from what I can see that is a vent for your sewage. Yes you can feed water down it, and yes the water will be taken away, but I highly doubt that it would be code compliant - it should go into stormwater.

 

I don't mean to be a stickler, and don't mean to judge you if you do intend on circumventing code - just giving a heads up. 

 

 

 

 

Chuckle - you're dead right - what a clanger :-) Especially when there's a more suitable drain less than a metre away :-) (Which still isn't stormwater but is actually already open to the elements)

 

 

 

Cheers - N

 

 


1797 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 120


  Reply # 1478741 26-Jan-2016 08:50
Send private message

That drain is an overflow relief gulley and not intended for stormwater either... 


Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.