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Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 198384 7-Jul-2016 08:50
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I have been fixing number of issues with my HVAC install (its a daikin system) and the last remaining issue is to have some sort of zone control so that i can heat downstairs without turning upstairs into a furnace. There are currently two outlets from the Daikin system which supplies the heating for the house, The first outlet supplies the air downstairs while the other one services upstairs. There is an electric damper attached to one of the branched off pipes that goes downstairs. I want to move the damper to the outlet servicing upstairs as per drawing below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

The question i have is, will that damage the daikin unit or affect its performance now that i will be blocking off one of the outlets?


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  Reply # 1587469 7-Jul-2016 09:16
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It shouldn't damage it. By only moving the damper you aren't changing the overall pressure in the system, simply moving which branch has more back pressure than the other.


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  Reply # 1587478 7-Jul-2016 09:30
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Does anyone have a source for a good value electric damper that's easy to install? I'd quite like to cut off the flow of air through our ventilation system when it's turned off - right now on a windy winters day I can feel a cool breeze through the ducts when the wind blows. I think I found one a couple of years ago but they were pretty expensive.





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  Reply # 1587486 7-Jul-2016 09:50
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We're just putting a ducted heat pump in and I'd like to make use of the ability to introduce fresh air through it. I understand I'll have to install an intake fan (with air filter), connected to an electronic damper, connected to the AC unit.Would set the AC to come on for a few hours during the warmest part of the day (in winter time) in circulate mode, open the damper and turn on the fan to bring in some warm air from the roof space.


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  Reply # 1587487 7-Jul-2016 09:52
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jnimmo:

 

We're just putting a ducted heat pump in and I'd like to make use of the ability to introduce fresh air through it. I understand I'll have to install an intake fan (with air filter), connected to an electronic damper, connected to the AC unit.Would set the AC to come on for a few hours during the warmest part of the day (in winter time) in circulate mode, open the damper and turn on the fan to bring in some warm air from the roof space.

 

 

You might be better off putting in a standalone heat recover ventilation system, like the cleanaire. Even better, get a system that does both heating and ventilation, Mitsubishi Lossnay is one that comes to mind, it does both.





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  Reply # 1588803 9-Jul-2016 13:46
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jnimmo:

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We're just putting a ducted heat pump in and I'd like to make use of the ability to introduce fresh air through it. I understand I'll have to install an intake fan (with air filter), connected to an electronic damper, connected to the AC unit.Would set the AC to come on for a few hours during the warmest part of the day (in winter time) in circulate mode, open the damper and turn on the fan to bring in some warm air from the roof space.

I'm

You may not need an extra fan, the pressure of the ducted unit can be sufficient to draw in fresh air. You may need manual balancing dampers.

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  Reply # 1588854 9-Jul-2016 14:59
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t0ny:

 

 

 

The question i have is, will that damage the daikin unit or affect its performance now that i will be blocking off one of the outlets?

 

 

You should be OK. I'm guessing there are no balancing dampers (dampers with no actuators which are manually set to pressure/volume balance the system). Your typical heat pump basher doesn't even know what a balancing damper does so I'd be surprised if you had any.

 

If you do have balancing dampers then you can likely fit your actuator to one of those but you'd probably be best to rebalance the system at the same time. If one branch is short and/or straight the air will want to go down that path rather than a long and/or twisty duct run. Just depends on your duct work layout.

 

How is the current damper actuator controlled? Does the Daikin unit do this or do you have a push button of some sort to control it?


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