Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




4128 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 551

Trusted

Topic # 198896 27-Jul-2016 15:20
Send private message

http://www.trustsmarthome.com/au/home/

 

 

 

The devices look like they could be z-wave (the relays etc) - but there's no info on the site if they are or not.  I saw them advertised in the NZ Handyman magazine.

 

 





Previously known as psycik

NextPVR: 
Gigabyte AMD A8 Brix --> Samsung LA46A650D via HDMI, NextPVR,
OpenHAB: ODroid C2 eMMC DriveOpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller, Raspberry PI, Wemos D1 Mini, Zwave and Bluetooth LE Sensors
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 2012 
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


Create new topic
1496 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 191

Trusted

  Reply # 1599615 27-Jul-2016 16:29
Send private message

Never heard of it but more info and videos here;

 

http://www.trust.com/en/product/71110-octopus-internet-control-station-ics-2000

 

 


1799 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 123


  Reply # 1599954 28-Jul-2016 06:27
Send private message

*sigh* Another ugly product that nobody who can afford it will want on their walls. I didn't check for pricing, but am assuming about $100 per piece, like most of the other gear out there. Happy to be proven wrong though.

 
 
 
 


21615 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4431

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1599958 28-Jul-2016 06:38
Send private message

Such photoshop!

 

 

 

 

In any case I saw something like this at a homeshow previously, did not look to be particually smart - more just remote control stuff, and the guy had no idea about the security of it when I asked.





Richard rich.ms



4128 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 551

Trusted

  Reply # 1599965 28-Jul-2016 07:15
Send private message

Disrespective: *sigh* Another ugly product that nobody who can afford it will want on their walls. I didn't check for pricing, but am assuming about $100 per piece, like most of the other gear out there. Happy to be proven wrong though.

 

It looked a little cheaper than fibaro zwave gear - which is what I was looking at.  And if it had the same capabilities I'd have been keen.  But without knowing if it is zwave and not some proprietary junk...





Previously known as psycik

NextPVR: 
Gigabyte AMD A8 Brix --> Samsung LA46A650D via HDMI, NextPVR,
OpenHAB: ODroid C2 eMMC DriveOpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller, Raspberry PI, Wemos D1 Mini, Zwave and Bluetooth LE Sensors
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 2012 
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


21615 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4431

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1599978 28-Jul-2016 07:48
Send private message

Yeah I have the feeling it's just basic 433 MHz stuff with a smart box taking commands from the app and changing them to open RF commands like the broadlink stuff does.




Richard rich.ms

1748 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 361

Trusted

  Reply # 1601721 31-Jul-2016 15:15
Send private message

All Trust SmartHome transmitters work with wireless radio signals (433 MHz) that are specifically coded for Trust SmartHome receivers. Other wireless devices - such as a modem, phone or baby monitor - use a different encoding and / or a different frequency. This rules out that Trust SmartHome receivers can spontaneously go on/off.




My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


21615 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4431

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1601728 31-Jul-2016 15:22
Send private message

Something like that hardly makes me confident that they aren't just using basic OOK type modules really. Those are "specially coded" by pulling pins high/low on them and can be replay attacked easy as.

 

If they had used words like "rolling code", "encryption" or "paired" then it might make sense, but specifically coded is marketing speak for no security at all.





Richard rich.ms

neb

732 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 128

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1602317 1-Aug-2016 15:19
Send private message

+1. Even "rolling codes" or "paired" doesn't mean much, look at the Princeton 2262, widely used in garade-door openers, which offers next to no security at all despite using "codes" and/or "pairing" and/or "encryption" depending on whose marketing you read. If you want any of this stuff done right, you'll have to DIY with an Arduino or Pi or something. And I'm not saying that as a rabid OSS advocate (I wouldn't want to DIY, too much work :-), but because most, if not all, of these IoT automation gadgets have next to no, or no, actual security.

1664 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 188

Subscriber

  Reply # 1602331 1-Aug-2016 15:37
Send private message

If they are just 433MHz RF then aside from the security (valid) concerns, you would also have to consider the range of these devices. Most likely they would have to be relatively close to the hub/receiver. This is where Z-Wave can really shine IMO, the mesh networking seems to work very well IME and allows for a single hub/receiver in a very large house, with intermediate nodes routing packets from the hub to out-reaching nodes. I have this scenario in my place and it works very well. IMO this is one of the biggest benefits of Z-Wave as all this mesh networking/routing is _baked_ into the protocol and (usually) _just works_. I.e. the controller software doesn't have anything to do with it, it is at the protocol level in the controller chip.


21615 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4431

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1602334 1-Aug-2016 15:42
Send private message

Bigger issue if they are 433 is that they seem to be 1 way so no idea if it worked or not. If you are there and mashing a remote it will be obvious but if it's a timed event then no way of knowing unless you just constantly transmit the states you want on a schedule. Buy that just stuffs up the already connjested band for everyone else.

433 is worse than 2.4 because all the transmissions are so slow they take the channel up for ages and have no carrier sense to avoid stepping on others.




Richard rich.ms

1664 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 188

Subscriber

  Reply # 1602335 1-Aug-2016 15:44
Send private message

I have some 433 devices using the RFXCOM protocol (from the UK) and they implement a very simple ACK to confirm a command was received and processed. So it is possible with 433, depending on the implementing protocol.

 

But I think we agree, 433 is inferior to ZWave, even though it may well be cheaper.


21615 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4431

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1602337 1-Aug-2016 15:46
Send private message

None of this gear will use those FSK modules. They will be OOK with those crappy 30c modules that are one directional and unreliable as.




Richard rich.ms

1664 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 188

Subscriber

  Reply # 1602338 1-Aug-2016 15:47
Send private message

Yep I have no doubt you are right - I wouldn't go near them with a 10ft barge pole.


neb

732 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 128

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1602340 1-Aug-2016 15:50
Send private message

Good point. I've had problems with conflicting 915MHz gear where some devices would randomly disconnect or drop out, it wasn't until I got a spectrum analyser that I noticed that some neighbour's device was acting as a wideband jammer in that frequency range, you'd get this tidal wave of signal smeared across 15MHz that rose up like a wave and settled down again every 30s or so, knocking out everything else in the vicinity. I would imagine 432Mhz is just as bad.

Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.