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neb



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Topic # 205736 24-Nov-2016 21:10
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I need to move about 15m of scoria down to the bottom of a steep section, about 20-25m. There's a steep, narrow, essentially unusable driveway that runs down there, but it's too steep, and with spilled scoria far too dangerous, to take a wheelbarrow down. At the moment the best option seems to be to use a skid-steer loader to truck it all down, since it can then also deposit it where it's needed. Another possible alternative is to set up some sort of chute, but the details get a bit vague... has anyone had to do this before and have any suggestions?

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gzt

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  Reply # 1677037 24-Nov-2016 21:38
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Never used one, but you are looking for a rubbish chute hire. Should be fine horizontally, but you will have to fix it to something at the top. Drive in a couple of steel fenceposts for instance.

neb



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  Reply # 1677041 24-Nov-2016 21:46
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Ah, that sounds like it, thanks. The fact that it's a long, steep drop kinda pointed towards a chute of some kind, but I didn't consider a rubbish chute. Just googling suppliers now...

 
 
 
 


neb



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  Reply # 1677467 25-Nov-2016 15:12
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After some investigation it turns out that it's probably not the right solution. Apparently (and I could be messing up this explanation, so take it with a grain of salt) rubbish chutes are engineered solutions, you can't just drop them into place but have to bolt them onto buildings/scaffolding (when they're being used for construction) in an appropriate manner. Running it at a slope down a property isn't normal usage, and there are concerns with material getting stuck on flatter parts of the slope, which would be difficult to clear. The intended usage is more along the lines of spend time and money to set it up, use it for a longish period of time, and then disassemble it again so the cost is amortised over the period of usage, rather than set up, use, and dismantle all in one day.

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  Reply # 1677480 25-Nov-2016 15:23
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What about something like this

 

http://www.miniveyor.co.nz/


gzt

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  Reply # 1677481 25-Nov-2016 15:23
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I've seen it done with old sheets of corogated iron curved into a chute and nailed or tied to stakes in the ground. Very effective. It's an option.

neb



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  Reply # 1677495 25-Nov-2016 15:44
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wellygary:

What about something like this

 

http://www.miniveyor.co.nz/

 

 

Yeah, had considered that too but it's even more work/cost than a rubbish chute.

 

 

It looks like the skid-steer loader is still the... not necessarily best but least bad option. It's been good to get comments though, I wanted to make sure there wasn't something obvious I'd missed.

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