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# 206196 13-Dec-2016 20:22
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I do know that all ovens/ranges/stoves are supposed to have a wall switch to kill the power to them.

 

This seems to be the relevant clause:

 

6.1.10 A low voltage electric range that is not a fixed wired appliance shall be connected to a power supply through a socket-outlet of appropriate rating and have a readily accessible isolation switch.

 

 

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

I guess that's readily accessible if you're a seven foot tall basket ball player.

 

 


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  # 1687323 13-Dec-2016 20:28
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We didn't have one until we got a new stove, so probably older regulations allowed that.


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  # 1687328 13-Dec-2016 20:37
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timmmay:

 

We didn't have one until we got a new stove, so probably older regulations allowed that.

 

 

 

 

AFAIK you are correct a moveable stove must have a plug but if it was installed under the old regs then hardwired is fine

 

However I think you are right on the isolation switch been a joke ....





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  # 1687364 13-Dec-2016 21:06
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DarthKermit:

 

I do know that all ovens/ranges/stoves are supposed to have a wall switch to kill the power to them.

 

This seems to be the relevant clause:

 

6.1.10 A low voltage electric range that is not a fixed wired appliance shall be connected to a power supply through a socket-outlet of appropriate rating and have a readily accessible isolation switch.

 

 

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

I guess that's readily accessible if you're a seven foot tall basket ball player.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your right, it's a bit rubbish. Looking at the switch, it's out of the 70's or early 80's, looking at the bench top etc it looks much more recent, looks to me that there may have been a bit of home renovation going on and the range relocated to a new position, and this is where the existing wiring reached to, that's why it's so high.

 

Here is a good rule of thumb for accessible, can you reach it without the use of a stool/ladder or reaching stick, if you can then it complies, if you can't then it doesn't. Generally 2.3m or above floor/ground level is classed as inaccessible

 

 


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  # 1687402 13-Dec-2016 22:07
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DarthKermit:

 

I do know that all ovens/ranges/stoves are supposed to have a wall switch to kill the power to them.

 

This seems to be the relevant clause:

 

6.1.10 A low voltage electric range that is not a fixed wired appliance shall be connected to a power supply through a socket-outlet of appropriate rating and have a readily accessible isolation switch.

 

 

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

I guess that's readily accessible if you're a seven foot tall basket ball player.

 

 

 

 

What's the reason for this switch?Thanks





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.




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  # 1687404 13-Dec-2016 22:13
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If your cooking catches fire, you have a switch right there to kill the power to the stove.

 

I found this example of a switch way too high for most people to be able to reach on a TradeMe real estate listing.


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  # 1687481 14-Dec-2016 06:37
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Most switches I have seen tend to be behind the oven/ cook top, so useless if something has caught fire!


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  # 1687486 14-Dec-2016 07:38
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I'm not a sparky either, but the quoted regulation says "that is not a fixed wired appliance" - presumably that stove is wired in, so I'd imagine that the regulation doesn't apply.

 

... But I still agree that the switch should be in a better place.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1687498 14-Dec-2016 07:50
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It's AS/NZS 3000 4.7.1 that covers the requirement for a switch located in a visible position within 2m of an open cooktop that can be operated without reaching across the cooktop.

 

I estimate that switch to be about 2m high, not ideal but you'll have the same problem with all the smoke alarms screaming at you. Sticking the lid on the burning pot gets more immediate results.

 

 


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  # 1687509 14-Dec-2016 08:48
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That is a bit high but the switch is no good in the case of a fire - the elements will take too long to cool down anyway.


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  # 1687513 14-Dec-2016 08:53
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Bung:

It's AS/NZS 3000 4.7.1 that covers the requirement for a switch located in a visible position within 2m of an open cooktop that can be operated without reaching across the cooktop.


Nearly every cooktop switch I've ever seen has it's switch behind it.

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  # 1687524 14-Dec-2016 09:15
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PaulBags:
Bung:

It's AS/NZS 3000 4.7.1 that covers the requirement for a switch located in a visible position within 2m of an open cooktop that can be operated without reaching across the cooktop.


Nearly every cooktop switch I've ever seen has it's switch behind it.


I don't know exactly when the position had to be to the side but anything done since as/nzs 3000:2007 came into effect should comply.

This reminds me of a Telecom Xmas do where the managers doing the BBQ finally realised they were out of control when the knobs melted off.

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  # 1687542 14-Dec-2016 09:27
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Bung:
PaulBags:
Bung:

 

It's AS/NZS 3000 4.7.1 that covers the requirement for a switch located in a visible position within 2m of an open cooktop that can be operated without reaching across the cooktop.

 


Nearly every cooktop switch I've ever seen has it's switch behind it.


I don't know exactly when the position had to be to the side but anything done since as/nzs 3000:2007 came into effect should comply.

This reminds me of a Telecom Xmas do where the managers doing the BBQ finally realised they were out of control when the knobs melted off.

 

I guess they like their meat black?





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 1689321 15-Dec-2016 12:23
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If something was on fire I don't think turning the oven off is the main priority.

 

However the switch there isn't the main issue IMO, the old oven is and the awful green wall.

 

renovate - paint the wall, in fact tile it is even better....especially round ovens, modernise the oven and move the switch while you're at it.

 

Problems solved.

 

 


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  # 1689352 15-Dec-2016 13:24
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pctek:

 

If something was on fire I don't think turning the oven off is the main priority.

 

However the switch there isn't the main issue IMO, the old oven is and the awful green wall.

 

renovate - paint the wall, in fact tile it is even better....especially round ovens, modernise the oven and move the switch while you're at it.

 

Problems solved.

 

 

Forget tile, go with a one-piece glass splashback - no grout and grooves to get gunked up, dead easy to clean. I have tile, don't like it.


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  # 1689504 15-Dec-2016 15:50

Have to agree here. We have titles and don't like it one bit.
Next kitchen renovation going with one piece glass splash back.

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