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Topic # 230612 5-Mar-2018 09:50
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Hi. 

 

We had our heat pump cleaned by a reputable company (highly rated on NCB). Immediately after, once the heatpump was turned on, there is a loud dripping noise onto our tin tiles right outside our bedroom.

 

There is something leaking at quite a considerable rate (big drip every second) when heatpump is on. 

 

Contacted the cleaning company, they are adamant it's nothing to do with them, but the co-incidence is startling. The Pipe it's leaking from is here: 

 

 

Part of that pipe looks pretty clean, compared to the other parts, though that could be an optical illusion.

 

 

 

Trying work out if the clean damaged it and are responsible or what we should do about the problem.

 

 


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  Reply # 1968151 5-Mar-2018 09:56
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Is it a back to back install?

 

Sounds like the condensate removal system, if not back to back they use a pump to remove to outside, maybe there was some blockage and now its clear after the service?




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  Reply # 1968152 5-Mar-2018 09:58
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Mavarick:

 

Is it a back to back install?

 

Sounds like the condensate removal system, if not back to back they use a pump to remove to outside, maybe there was some blockage and now its clear after the service?

 

 

The Heat pump head is on the wall inside about the same place as that pipe yes. 

 

I'm assuming that if there was a blockage, which is now clear it shouldn't be leaking onto the roof. I assume that's part of the reason for the pipe. 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1968154 5-Mar-2018 10:03
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Not a Fridgie but,

 

 

 

I believe these cleaners are a liquid which is sprayed on to dissolve the build up on the fins in the internal unit, they will then be rinsed off (I assume)

 

this puts liquid into the drip tray, (when cooling the heat pump produces condensate from the fins,)

 

Your drip tray will either be gravity drain or drain to a condensate pump.

 

 

 

If gravity there should be no build up,

 

For a condensate pump it holds the liquid till a float valve is trigged or, power is reapplied (if it's switched by the heat pump) 

 

 

 

The cleaning fluid may have just been held in the pump and being pumped out in volume. Should stop

 

Condensate is produced at a lower volume during operation and would evaporate rapidly in most cases (cooling used on hot days)

 

 

 

Just a thought


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  Reply # 1968156 5-Mar-2018 10:05
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Or if its dripping from the ducting up the top, The guy may have dislodged a join in the drain hose, 

 

 


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  Reply # 1968161 5-Mar-2018 10:11
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The fact it has black markings around the catchment (drips that cling on and dont run off) and green at the join.

 

It's probably not had a good seal for donkeys, and is now finding an easier path out again.

 

The red is quite possibly the cleaning agent pooling. 

 

 

 

Pay to check that Soffit too, shouldn't have black marks unless the drain on your gutter is a bit full :)


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  Reply # 1968163 5-Mar-2018 10:13
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Hard to see exactly what you mean. My Fujitsu heat pump on air conditioning mode is doing one big drop every 1-3 seconds when it's hot and humid, but it comes out of something that is clearly a drain hose.





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  Reply # 1968175 5-Mar-2018 10:20
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timmmay:

 

Hard to see exactly what you mean. My Fujitsu heat pump on air conditioning mode is doing one big drop every 1-3 seconds when it's hot and humid, but it comes out of something that is clearly a drain hose.

 

 

Are you saying it's normal for water to drip onto the roof? Presumably, we would have heard this happening prior to today.

 

I've not seen this before. Doesn't happen on my sons heat pump?


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  Reply # 1968178 5-Mar-2018 10:23
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The OP has moisture issues in the house. 5BR, two storey, 12 YO. 2 or 3 Heatpumps, and a pellet fire, seems odd to have damp issues

 

Might this be a possible clue to the moisture if the drain system may not be working correctly? Just a thought, if moisture is being held within the building, and moist air is seeping inside. Not necessarily as wet walls, but a small gradual damp air intrusion. 

 

Just throwing that out there, as we also have a large two storey house, 5 BR, 2 heatpumps, and while ChCh is not as humid as AKL, no moisture issues here. Its too big IMO for natural dampness to happen




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  Reply # 1968182 5-Mar-2018 10:29
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Maybe I am not explaining the issue properly. 

 

As best I can tell, prior to the clean we had no issues, but after the clean had been completed, we were able to hear audible dripping noises once heatpump had been going a few minutes. Looked outside and there is a fairly steady stream of drips coming out of that pipe where the red area in the picture. Cleaning company say they don't use red/pink liquid. 

 

I assume given there is a pipe there, it wouldn't be normal for water to drip onto the roof. I am sure we would have heard that before. 

 

I am wondering if they have tried to clean the rectangular bit of pipe (sorry I don't know it's correct name) and maybe loosened something, or broken a seal?

 

 


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  Reply # 1968183 5-Mar-2018 10:30
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networkn:

 

timmmay:

 

Hard to see exactly what you mean. My Fujitsu heat pump on air conditioning mode is doing one big drop every 1-3 seconds when it's hot and humid, but it comes out of something that is clearly a drain hose.

 

 

Are you saying it's normal for water to drip onto the roof? Presumably, we would have heard this happening prior to today.

 

I've not seen this before. Doesn't happen on my sons heat pump?

 

 

Moisture is in the air. The amount varies. And depending on the amount of evaporation exchange there may be a lot of moisture drawn out that needs getting rid of

 

Cleaning it has quite possibly given the efficiency to do so at a greater rate back

 

This is normally via a pump and hosing back to the exchanger as pointed out, or a gravity drain to a local drain outlet. Most single level installs you will find a small pipe running out the side of the unit, and why its super slippery walking past in winter when it is working hard to generate heat.

 

In that capping there will likely be a mixture of in/out condensing lines and a drain run. Or using the raw capping itself.

 

 


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  Reply # 1968188 5-Mar-2018 10:31
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My Aspen condensate pump moves it about 1.5 m up and 7m across the roof space to drain outside on the ground, 

 

the reason I know  this , as only been in house about 7 months and set to cooling and had water running down the internal wall after about 10.

 

After a cpl of goes found the pump in the roof space and also found it didnt work,


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  Reply # 1968191 5-Mar-2018 10:32
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Red can be oxidised copper run off too... 


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  Reply # 1968245 5-Mar-2018 12:45
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I think you are going to have to get somebody around to check it.



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  Reply # 1968251 5-Mar-2018 12:50
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Yeah, called Mitsubishi. Seems like the inital install probably wasn't insulated well enough and during cleaning something has come uplodged. It's not longer dripping from the "drain". They are sure it's not harmful, but I'll contact the original installer. 

 

It would have been the cleaners who dislodged the plastic/insulation, but incorrect installation was the cause as it should be secure. 

 

Thanks for the advice. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1968325 5-Mar-2018 16:03
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That square plastic trunking can normally be very easily opened - it just clips together. Turn the isolating switch off first. Inside the trunking will be the copper refrigerant lines (each insulated), the power cable between the inside and outside units, and the condensate drain tube. The condensate tube will either be leaking, or if it goes uphill and water can pool in it, it can get cold enough for condensation to form on the outside of the pipe, and start dripping too.


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