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Topic # 236059 16-May-2018 10:57
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https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12052330

 

 

 

Basically, they perform so poorly, they shouldn't be sold or used in homes. 

 

IE they won't save your life, don't rely on them.

 

 


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  Reply # 2016724 16-May-2018 11:04
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Thanks for the heads up.

 

Aren't ionisation alarms intended for smoky locations, where photoelectric alarms would give too many false positives?  For example kitchens and workshops?

 

That's the rational I've used to choose ours, for better or worse.





Mike



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  Reply # 2016727 16-May-2018 11:07
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We use the NEST ones. I don't think they are certified in NZ but I trust them. 

 

We previously used two of the long life tiny little units. I can't recall their names. We had the heat ones in the kitchen and the smoke ones elsewhere. 

 

 


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  Reply # 2016756 16-May-2018 11:45
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The ionisation ones are terrible at detecting "smouldering" files where there aren't fast moving particles or heat to deflect the ionisation stream. The smoke alarm in a fish tank seems to have been a staple of news reports for years. See for example:

 

 

Ionisation alarms are also subject to false alarms, particularly in kitchens (e.g. hold one over an active toaster or kettle and it will probably go off).

 

We've just used photoelectric smoke alarms throughout the house.


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  Reply # 2016762 16-May-2018 12:06
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I have been thinking for a while that I should replace my ionising unit with a photoelectric unit but I've been putting it off because I'm guessing the bracket won't fit the existing screw holes, which means more holes in the ceiling.

 

How do other people deal with this when replacing old smoke alarms? I assume there's no standardisation of the gap between the two screw holes in the bracket?


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  Reply # 2016768 16-May-2018 12:13
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alasta:

 

I have been thinking for a while that I should replace my ionising unit with a photoelectric unit but I've been putting it off because I'm guessing the bracket won't fit the existing screw holes, which means more holes in the ceiling.

 

How do other people deal with this when replacing old smoke alarms? I assume there's no standardisation of the gap between the two screw holes in the bracket?

 

 

Of course not! But if the existing ones are in the right place (avoiding dead spots) then the new alarm should at least cover them up. You might get lucky. There are usually a few holes in the template and you might be able to make them match. At minimum, one will line up and you only have to drill one more.

 

As an aside, it's one of my pet grumbles that smoke alarms and other small appliances only ever come with masonry anchors, which are completely unnecessary for gib walls. Our current place is littered with the things (bright red mostly) from the previous owners.


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  Reply # 2016771 16-May-2018 12:21
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alasta:

 

I have been thinking for a while that I should replace my ionising unit with a photoelectric unit but I've been putting it off because I'm guessing the bracket won't fit the existing screw holes, which means more holes in the ceiling.

 

How do other people deal with this when replacing old smoke alarms? I assume there's no standardisation of the gap between the two screw holes in the bracket?

 

 

I have never found any kind of standardisation even between different models of the same type of alarm. Every manufacturer invents its own bracket, just different enough from all the others to require new screw holes. I should have posted that in Annoyances because it is a small thing that sure annoys me. Probably the best you can do is try to reuse one of the holes and position the bracket to cover the other ones. Depending on your ceiling material, you might be able to get away with some adhesive stick-on strips to hold the alarm in place. I haven't tried them for that but they work pretty well for other things.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 2016775 16-May-2018 12:25
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Another option is if you can buy a thin circular white disk, use that as a fascia for the alarm, and as above use one existing hole for the fascia/alarm bracket and make the other which will be hidden 


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  Reply # 2016823 16-May-2018 13:37
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alasta:

 

I have been thinking for a while that I should replace my ionising unit with a photoelectric unit but I've been putting it off because I'm guessing the bracket won't fit the existing screw holes, which means more holes in the ceiling.

 

How do other people deal with this when replacing old smoke alarms? I assume there's no standardisation of the gap between the two screw holes in the bracket?

 

 

 

 

Although you can just cover the holes with the new alarm fixing plate. Heard people fill the holes with toothpaste instead of plaster filler.

 

 

 

In case anyone is looking for new alarms, Bunnings have a special on 10 year photoelectiric ones for just 8 dollars!. That is almost cheaper than a battery, and alarms should be replaced every 10 years anyway.  https://www.bunnings.co.nz/kidde-10-year-photoelectric-smoke-alarm_p00022465 . You can probably save by getting mitre 10 to price beat it if you are getting a house lot..


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  Reply # 2016824 16-May-2018 13:40
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Rikkitic:

 

 

 

I have never found any kind of standardisation even between different models of the same type of alarm. Every manufacturer invents its own bracket, just different enough from all the others to require new screw holes. I should have posted that in Annoyances because it is a small thing that sure annoys me. Probably the best you can do is try to reuse one of the holes and position the bracket to cover the other ones. Depending on your ceiling material, you might be able to get away with some adhesive stick-on strips to hold the alarm in place. I haven't tried them for that but they work pretty well for other things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the 10 year ones, installing it and turning it on the bracket activates the switch. So standardizing them would be very difficult. Yes annoying, but far more annoying things than that in life! LED light fittings that fail, and not being able to get matches without replacing them all is another annoyance.


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  Reply # 2016857 16-May-2018 14:18
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Thanks for the heads-up, guys. 

 

Will wander around and check ours.


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  Reply # 2016863 16-May-2018 14:22
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mattwnz:

 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/kidde-10-year-photoelectric-smoke-alarm_p00022465 . You can probably save by getting mitre 10 to price beat it if you are getting a house lot..

 

 

Mitre 10 don't sell that brand so they wouldn't price beat it. And even if they did sell that brand and you found what looked to be an identical model, you'll find that it will have a different model code and so Mitre 10 will say their price match guarantee doesn't count. That's how Mitre 10 and Bunnings get away with their price match guarantee, they get the suppliers to create a unique model number.


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  Reply # 2016893 16-May-2018 14:53
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networkn:

 

We previously used two of the long life tiny little units. I can't recall their names. We had the heat ones in the kitchen and the smoke ones elsewhere. 

 

 

Cavius? 

 

That's what we have.  I thought the kitchen ones were ionisation alarms but just checked the website and they are heat.





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  Reply # 2016894 16-May-2018 14:53
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mattwnz:

In case anyone is looking for new alarms, Bunnings have a special on 10 year photoelectiric ones for just 8 dollars!. That is almost cheaper than a battery, and alarms should be replaced every 10 years anyway.  https://www.bunnings.co.nz/kidde-10-year-photoelectric-smoke-alarm_p00022465 . You can probably save by getting mitre 10 to price beat it if you are getting a house lot..



The Kidde 10Y29 sell for close to £13 on Amazon UK. $8 does look like a good price.



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  Reply # 2016977 16-May-2018 16:06
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Bung:

The Kidde 10Y29 sell for close to £13 on Amazon UK. $8 does look like a good price.

 

Are they any good? 

 

Interesting product smoke alarms from a user review perspective. 

 

Few consumers ever know (or want to find out) if their smoke detector actually does it's job well.





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  Reply # 2016993 16-May-2018 16:47
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mattwnz:

alasta:


I have been thinking for a while that I should replace my ionising unit with a photoelectric unit but I've been putting it off because I'm guessing the bracket won't fit the existing screw holes, which means more holes in the ceiling.


How do other people deal with this when replacing old smoke alarms? I assume there's no standardisation of the gap between the two screw holes in the bracket?



 


Although you can just cover the holes with the new alarm fixing plate. Heard people fill the holes with toothpaste instead of plaster filler.


 


In case anyone is looking for new alarms, Bunnings have a special on 10 year photoelectiric ones for just 8 dollars!. That is almost cheaper than a battery, and alarms should be replaced every 10 years anyway.  https://www.bunnings.co.nz/kidde-10-year-photoelectric-smoke-alarm_p00022465 . You can probably save by getting mitre 10 to price beat it if you are getting a house lot..



Thank you will get some this weekend

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