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674 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 240024 15-Aug-2018 21:40
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Hi all,

 

We are doing a kitchen, dining room reno and are looking to put down tiles. We also want to put down underfloor heating to keep the tiles warm in the winter. The floor area we will tile is approximately 15 m2. The floor is concrete slab so looking to put in standard heating wires. I am looking for a bit of feedback on anyone's experiences re, install and running cost.

 

I am also wondering what kind of controller everyone is using, are there any under-flooring controllers which are Wifi enabled?


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  Reply # 2074256 16-Aug-2018 07:03
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We have heated tiles in our bathroom. If you're barefoot you need to heat tiles all year round imho, maybe not at the very peak of summer, they feel very cold otherwise.

Our old controller told us cost. From memory in winter it was $1 to $2 per day at a moderate temperature. Floor area is about 12 square metres of tiles.




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  Reply # 2074549 16-Aug-2018 16:05
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We tend to specify products like these: https://www.tilewarehouse.co.nz/diy/devi-underfloor-heating/

 

They're easy to install but don't always cover 100% of the floor (not that you will be standing in the corners anyway). 

 

You can also consider using an under tile insulation board to help keep the heat in the tile. http://www.marmox.co.nz/

 

We have had a few tradies talk to us about how they recommend also heating under the shower tiles if you are going that far. Not to keep them heated under-foot but to help drive moisture away from the flooring after a shower. We haven't specified it on any jobs yet but it might be worth discussing or thinking about if you are concerned.


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  Reply # 2074551 16-Aug-2018 16:12
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We used https://www.warmup.co.nz/  for both under tile heating and also waterproofing the floors.

 

Uses the TH115 controller - It just works. Couldn't tell you the operating cost though. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2074580 16-Aug-2018 17:30
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Not what your after, maybe an option.

 

We are about 98% finished a rebuild/renovation and were aiming to tile about 40m2

 

After looking at options for tiles and underfloor heating we talked to a friend an looked into Vinyl tiles.

 

Lino was never an option but these tiles with a synthetic grout are really really good.

 

I and everyone I have had look at them have been really impressed

 

Did the whole area for less than just the tile labour would have cost and its a lot more practical IMO.


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  Reply # 2074603 16-Aug-2018 19:54
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My father in law, who for many years owned a bathroom / kitchen business in the UK, highly recommends vinyl tiles.





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  Reply # 2074606 16-Aug-2018 20:03
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If you put in heating make sure you use a floor sensor. The sensor is mounted at the same time as the heating element. Once the self leveling compound is poured it's too late. With undertile heating you are heating the floor, not the room. You are trying to make the floor feel warm, which is a different application to heating entire the room. A floor sensor and a thermostat with an 7 day time clock works well.

 

Every thermostat uses a different (proprietary) sensor so you need to choose the thermostat you want and then install the sensor.

 

The major players in this space are Honeywell TH115 and Siemens RDE100.1 (neither are wifi / smart) but there are lots of small players as well. You should try and have a play with the different thermostats as the UI for most thermostats isn't particularly intuitive. The concern with a smaller player is will the sensor element (ie NTC 10k etc) be supported in 10 years time. Generally a major manufacturer will offer a migration option. You do often get better features from a smaller player.

 

Disclaimer: I work for a thermostat manufacturer so have a personal view but you should make up your own mind.


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  Reply # 2074614 16-Aug-2018 20:12
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We have underfloor heating, upstairs tiles in an ensuite and public bathroom/shower/bath.  7yo house so I assume that the floor is well insulated. Its great. And the tiles hold the warmth for a good while due to insulation. Its not just non freezing floor or warm floor, the ambient heat fills the room. 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2075515 18-Aug-2018 21:47
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kryptonjohn:

We used https://www.warmup.co.nz/  for both under tile heating and also waterproofing the floors.


Uses the TH115 controller - It just works. Couldn't tell you the operating cost though. 


 


 


 



Thanks for this, we have a large pooch (golden retriever) and I’m not sure how well these would stand up to his paws. Do you know how hard wearing the vinyl tiles are?



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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2075516 18-Aug-2018 22:01
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Disrespective:

We tend to specify products like these: https://www.tilewarehouse.co.nz/diy/devi-underfloor-heating/


They're easy to install but don't always cover 100% of the floor (not that you will be standing in the corners anyway). 


You can also consider using an under tile insulation board to help keep the heat in the tile. http://www.marmox.co.nz/


We have had a few tradies talk to us about how they recommend also heating under the shower tiles if you are going that far. Not to keep them heated under-foot but to help drive moisture away from the flooring after a shower. We haven't specified it on any jobs yet but it might be worth discussing or thinking about if you are concerned.



Interesting about the underfloor, insulation, sounds like a good idea to stop all heat going into the slab.I wonder how much extra cost they add. Seems like a lot of work because you essentially lay those before laying the actual tiles.

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  Reply # 2075580 19-Aug-2018 00:04
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Shoes2468:
Disrespective:

 

We tend to specify products like these: https://www.tilewarehouse.co.nz/diy/devi-underfloor-heating/

 

 

 

They're easy to install but don't always cover 100% of the floor (not that you will be standing in the corners anyway). 

 

 

 

You can also consider using an under tile insulation board to help keep the heat in the tile. http://www.marmox.co.nz/

 

 

 

We have had a few tradies talk to us about how they recommend also heating under the shower tiles if you are going that far. Not to keep them heated under-foot but to help drive moisture away from the flooring after a shower. We haven't specified it on any jobs yet but it might be worth discussing or thinking about if you are concerned.

 



Interesting about the underfloor, insulation, sounds like a good idea to stop all heat going into the slab.I wonder how much extra cost they add. Seems like a lot of work because you essentially lay those before laying the actual tiles.

 

 

 

I imagine it adds to the thickness, and could be an issue with heights if using a inbuilt tile shower. Also the height of carpet at the threshold.


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