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Topic # 240521 12-Sep-2018 08:50
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Hi

 

Just bought an outdoor lounge set made from Acacia wood.  Instructions suggest that we put a cover on them or bring them indoors - not practical

 

It lives in a sheltered patio area away from the rain but will be exposed to sunlight.

 

what do people use ?   Teak oil, Tung Oil, Linseed oil, Danish Oil   --- so many choices

 

I really dont want to use a stain as this will darken the already nice looking paler wood colour.

 

Stains are better they say because it contains pigments that will block UV and also I need a protective coating as well

 

after I apply the wood protective oils.  Would a protective coating of polyeutherane or varnish cause the membrane to peel and flake off?

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated from real life experiences.  Want to do this properly hence this post.

 

 

 

cheers

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 2089301 12-Sep-2018 14:21
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MikeAqua:

 

Try something like this - made for deck timbers on boats.

 

https://www.burnsco.co.nz/shop/paint-maintenance/cleaners-polishes/yachticon-teak-oil-clear/teak-oil-yachticon-clear-500ml?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs-zTxu6z3QIVGwoqCh1PWgsaEAQYAiABEgJs-_D_BwE

 

 

 

 

Thanks MikeH20

 

I will try them as they are close to work as well.

 

Most of the teak oil at Bunnings do not mention UV protection

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2089384 12-Sep-2018 15:45
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I use linseed oil and it has quite a strong darkening effect so I wouldn't recommend that if you want to keep the current pale wood colour.

 

I use rags and dispose of them very carefully as they can catch alight in sunlight from the vapours I believe. Have read a few scary stories of sheds burning down.


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  Reply # 2089473 12-Sep-2018 19:00
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lurker:

I use linseed oil and it has quite a strong darkening effect so I wouldn't recommend that if you want to keep the current pale wood colour.


I use rags and dispose of them very carefully as they can catch alight in sunlight from the vapours I believe. Have read a few scary stories of sheds burning down.



Linseed oil heats up as it oxidises. Rags in a pile (or even screwed into a ball) can build up enough heat that they will spontaneously combust. Always dry rags flat and away from anything else flammable before disposing.

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  Reply # 2089475 12-Sep-2018 19:04
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Outdoor furniture oil (Cabot's or equivalent) is probably your best bet. Varnish and polyurethane are typically indoor use only. Stains etc. typically aren't designed to be sat on.

Depending on where you live (coastal, uv etc) I would consider putting the outdoor furniture away or under covers if you're not using it for any length of time (e.g. winter). You might find yourself oiling it every one to two years otherwise.

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  Reply # 2089520 12-Sep-2018 19:25
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Maybe Metalex Clear is an option.





Gordy


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  Reply # 2089523 12-Sep-2018 19:28
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I carefully covered our outdoor macrocarpa furniture with 3 coats of Bondall Monocel Gold Marine Grade varnish, on recommendation.  They looked great when done.  2 years later, the varnish is half peeled off, and it looks absolutely terrible.  So, avoid this solution.

 

I am now completely sanding it all down, and covering it all with Resene Woodsman wood oil stain.  We shall see.





gml


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  Reply # 2089627 13-Sep-2018 07:02
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See also this thread on wood finishing, and oils and varnishes.



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  Reply # 2103044 7-Oct-2018 21:33
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Purchased the Teak Oil suggested from MikeAqua 

 

Very happy with the application.  Wood came out slightly darker (golden brown) with a sheen

 

Only time will tell.


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  Reply # 2103052 7-Oct-2018 21:59
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Hmm, I woulda gone with this Yachticon product instead :-).

 

 

Actually I'm not sure whether the Yachticon oil is the best solution, there's no MSDS for it but a data sheet indicates the primary component is iodopropynyl butylcarbamate which is a biocide/wood preservative, alongside some hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS). There's presumably something like polyurethane varnish in there as well, since HALS are used to stabilise that. On the one hand it's impressive because a lot of these magic oils seem to consist mostly of voodoo while this one actually has genuine active ingredients that do what you want in it. OTOH I'm not sure if something specifically formulated to protect teak in a marine environment will provide the intended effect here, HALS stabilise the varnish but don't absorb UV themselves and the carbamate won't have much effect unless your lounge set is going to be underwater.



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  Reply # 2105338 10-Oct-2018 10:47
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Here is the finished look.

 

The table is un-coated.

 

 

 

Click to see full size


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  Reply # 2105379 10-Oct-2018 10:59
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Nice, how many coats have you done?

 

I am just oiling (with Teak Oil) some chairs that we are going to use outdoors. I scrubbed them down with steel wool and applied one coat (with a brush, as recommended for outdoor use), and the first coat on looks really good. I will do two more. It takes about 8 hours to dry/not be tacky. Hopefully it does a good job of protecting the wood.




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  Reply # 2105405 10-Oct-2018 11:10
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Only the one coat. Didnt give them a scrub down, but maybe I should have.  But I did go over more than once for the top and end bits.


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  Reply # 2106653 12-Oct-2018 11:01
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qwertee:

 

Only the one coat. Didnt give them a scrub down, but maybe I should have.  But I did go over more than once for the top and end bits.

 

 

I thought the first time you do it you were meant to keep applying coats until it doesn't doesn't absorb any more (2 or 3 in total maybe)? But once it stops absorbing you need to wipe of any excess before it gets tacky. That what I did with my deck anyway - I've never done furniture.

 

For others following this thread, be aware of the current trend off manufacturers labeling a lot of water-based type products as "oils". These are the ones that flake and peel after a while. My understanding is anything labelled as "water cleanup" is NOT an oil based product.


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  Reply # 2106720 12-Oct-2018 12:30
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Paul1977:

 

<snip>

 

For others following this thread, be aware of the current trend off manufacturers labeling a lot of water-based type products as "oils". These are the ones that flake and peel after a while. My understanding is anything labelled as "water cleanup" is NOT an oil based product.

 

 

Not exactly. There is a difference between water-borne and water-based products. It is now quite common to have stains and other penetrating oils in a water-based solvent. The magic is in getting the oil and water to mix nicely. I've found (for example) the Resene Waterborne Woodsman exterior stains to be easily as durable as the solvent-borne equivalents, and clearly much easier and quicker to apply and clean up after. 


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