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# 248702 6-Apr-2019 16:58
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Looking for opinions on them. Easy to start? Reliable? Maintenance easy? I'm looking for a new 18" chainsaw and seeing as husqvarna are doing 60 months interest free thought I would look at them. The missus is keen on a Stihl but I'm open.


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  # 2211877 6-Apr-2019 17:57
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I have in the past but prefer Stihl these days.  I bought a Stihl MS 261 for my wife ~12 months ago to help clear up our forestry mess and she loves it - its on the lower end of their commercial chainsaw range but light in weight for its power so easier for her to handle. It happily rocks a 18" bar, but is at the pricier end of the scale.


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  # 2211880 6-Apr-2019 17:59
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I've had a Husqvarna 445e for 5 years, it only gets used 3-4 times a year but has never had any problems starting.
I don't bother draining fuel before leaving it sitting, just add some fresh fuel each time I use it.

 

It came with a 16" bar but I bought a 20" for bigger jobs and it handles it surprisingly well - even through hardwood logs that I had to attack from both sides to get through.

 

My only complaint is it seeps chain oil, where it's sitting is a puddle of oil... the dealer told me it was normal and a google search found plenty of others with the same issue also being told it was normal.


 
 
 
 




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  # 2212147 7-Apr-2019 09:46
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Thanks for the replies. I'll check both brands out before buying.

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  # 2212149 7-Apr-2019 09:57
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The xp range are good saws. Echo saws are worth a look as well.

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  # 2212386 7-Apr-2019 18:39
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Once many many  years ago husband had a stihl. It was Old when he got it . So came the day it died he got a new one and it was a Husky. This went brilliantly for years and years and years.  About 25 actually.

 

Then we moved and alas it died finally.

 

We bought another, and what a piece of manure.

 

We had it 8 years, used hardly at all- maybe 4 times in total and moved again, and it went in the rubbish. Didn't even try and sell it.

 

Bought another Stihl.  Brilliant.

 

 

 

Husky was good once. Not anymore.

 

Save the heartache and just buy a Stihl.


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  # 2212474 7-Apr-2019 21:17
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Sorry to interject into this thread I read mailers and am surprised by the difference in price and unfamiliar with wielding one regularly (so don't know a cost/benefit ratio), may I ask what separates the husqvarna and Stihl from the bog standard Jobmate brand or similar at around 1/4 the price.

 

 

 

To the people reading this thread who just want an occasional around the garden type chainsaw, (possibly seeing action maybe 5 times a year tops) are the more expendy brands worth the difference?

 

I mean only asking as the Op's query seem to be answered and my query doesn't seem to warrant its own thread.




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  # 2212518 8-Apr-2019 07:24
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I've currently got a cheap chainsaw, sub $200 homelite from Bunnings. The biggest problem is starting it. This weekend it started straight away, previous time it took over 30 minutes.

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  # 2212542 8-Apr-2019 07:59
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tehgerbil:

 

To the people reading this thread who just want an occasional around the garden type chainsaw, (possibly seeing action maybe 5 times a year tops) are the more expendy brands worth the difference?

 

 

It's more the hours you do rather than number of times you use it. If you do anything more than a full day or two a year ringing firewood you quickly find that spending $2000 on a big Stihl magnum is a good investment as you can go both much faster, in a safer manner and cut bigger logs . You feel like you spend more time sharpening chains though :)

 

On the subject of safety,get a safety mit  fitted to your saw (as well as good chaps/helmet/earmuffs etc!). If you were a business operation worksafe will have your guts for garters if someone gets hurt without one fitted - IMHO they should be included with every saw sold regardless of use. They aren't so much for protecting your hand from debris but to make sure you don't let the handle go when you get kickback which tends to result in the saw connecting with your body.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 2212548 8-Apr-2019 08:14
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Mike61: Looking for opinions on them. Easy to start? Reliable? Maintenance easy? I'm looking for a new 18" chainsaw and seeing as husqvarna are doing 60 months interest free thought I would look at them. The missus is keen on a Stihl but I'm open. 

 

I rock a Stihl myself, an old ex forestry 044 which has had a hard life. I use it quite a lot and it still gets a hard time but it fires up nicely and runs/cuts well. I do however take the bar off after every use and clean it up and around the clutch area, and the air filter gets a cleanout too. My mates who I go out logging with and a chap we sometimes bring in to do really tricky stuff all use Stihl, so I'm quite sold on that brand. That said I know a few people who have Husky's and swear by them. I think between the two brands, as a generalisation, there's little difference in terms of reliability.

 

 

 

tehgerbil: Sorry to interject into this thread I read mailers and am surprised by the difference in price and unfamiliar with wielding one regularly (so don't know a cost/benefit ratio), may I ask what separates the husqvarna and Stihl from the bog standard Jobmate brand or similar at around 1/4 the price.

 

To the people reading this thread who just want an occasional around the garden type chainsaw, (possibly seeing action maybe 5 times a year tops) are the more expendy brands worth the difference?

 

I mean only asking as the Op's query seem to be answered and my query doesn't seem to warrant its own thread. 

 

Quality of components. Your cheap chainsaws will do a reasonable around the home on small trees etc which is what they're designed for. Stihl and Husky have cheaper chainsaw ranges which are excellent for this market and are not too differently priced but will *probably* last longer. You also need to make sure you're not comparing brands like Echo, Shindaiwa, Zomax etc against the professional series of Stihls that forestry workers and arborists (such as the Treescape people) tend to favour [and Husky's to a lesser extent].


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  # 2212553 8-Apr-2019 08:27
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Mike61: I've currently got a cheap chainsaw, sub $200 homelite from Bunnings. The biggest problem is starting it. This weekend it started straight away, previous time it took over 30 minutes.

 

Could be a few issues at play including fuel mix, fuel condition, carburettor adjustment, spark plug/HT lead condition, starting procedure. You in Wellington by any chance?


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  # 2212558 8-Apr-2019 08:37
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htbrst: On the subject of safety,get a safety mit  fitted to your saw (as well as good chaps/helmet/earmuffs etc!). If you were a business operation worksafe will have your guts for garters if someone gets hurt without one fitted - IMHO they should be included with every saw sold regardless of use. They aren't so much for protecting your hand from debris but to make sure you don't let the handle go when you get kickback which tends to result in the saw connecting with your body. 

 

This is a great point!

 

To reduce the potential for kickback always keep an eye on the tip of the saw and what it's likely to come into contact with. To help reduce danger from any kickback don't position yourself directly over the chainbar and cut at a slight angle so if it does kick it won't flick up directly at you. Also be aware of where people around you are positioned. Kickbacks are lightening fast and the associated risks are massive.


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  # 2212580 8-Apr-2019 09:14
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I've used a selection of Husky saws in the past.  Worked well enough though we often had issues starting them after sitting for a while.  Mostly that was due to stale fuel more than the saw itself.  Drain and refuel, prime then a few pulls and they were away and racing again.  They tended to sit in their boxes for most of the year, coming out about once or twice at most.

 

Can confirm they used to end up sitting in a puddle of chain oil though.







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  # 2212676 8-Apr-2019 10:23
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Dratsab:

Mike61: I've currently got a cheap chainsaw, sub $200 homelite from Bunnings. The biggest problem is starting it. This weekend it started straight away, previous time it took over 30 minutes.


Could be a few issues at play including fuel mix, fuel condition, carburettor adjustment, spark plug/HT lead condition, starting procedure. You in Wellington by any chance?



I'm up near Katikati. I have been thinking I need to pull it apart and check out things. Saying that its always been hard to start. Maybe I'm holding my tongue the wrong way.

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  # 2212684 8-Apr-2019 10:48
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Mike61: I've currently got a cheap chainsaw, sub $200 homelite from Bunnings. The biggest problem is starting it. This weekend it started straight away, previous time it took over 30 minutes.

 

 

Try draining out all the petrol after you use it .

 

Could be a build up of 2 stroke oil fouling things up ?

 

 


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  # 2212716 8-Apr-2019 11:41
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My last petrol saw was a Husky 455 Rancher X-torq.  I bought second hand and used it infrequently, and then sold to a mate how uses it on farm as a firewood saw.

 

Best saw I ever had, light and well balanced with 18-20 inch bar, good power, easy to start, good adjustable oiler.  Always started after long periods of no use. 

 

Was even better with new bar an newer style low resistance chain.  The original got damaged clearing shrubs and stumps entangled in mesh fencing. 

 

Just grease the clutch bearing and sprocket tip and turn the bar over regularly. Use Husqvarna synthetic two stroke oil at 50:1 mix.  

 

 

 

You do get what you pay for with saws. 

 

 

 

My needs have changed and I only need a small brushless 18v saw for shrub and tree work at home.  





:)


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