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# 248950 17-Apr-2019 09:22
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Hi,

 

We are beginning the design process for building a new house and I'm wanting to throw a few of my own ideas together to have a play with layout and room size etc.

 

The Christchurch City Council rules say the minimum setback from an internal boundary is 1m, but I'm not sure if that is 1m to the exterior wall or 1m to the eave.

 

E.g. if you have a 600mm eave, does that effectively make the setback to the exterior wall 1.6m?

 

Does anyone know how this works?

 

Thanks

 

Paul





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Ultimate Geek
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Chorus

  # 2219745 17-Apr-2019 10:54
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Just call the CCC main phone number (039418999) and ask to speak to a duty planner. They are usually super helpful and can answer simple questions like this over the phone.


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  # 2219749 17-Apr-2019 10:57
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It makes sense to be from the edge of the roof line. This is to do with the shadow formation as well as privacy from my understanding.

 

 

 

For example - building a car port will be an issue as it still has a roof on compared to a parking pad even though both of them have no walls.

 

 

 

Correct me if I am wrong please!


 
 
 
 


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  # 2219766 17-Apr-2019 11:26
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I am not an authority but when I asked the builder next door last year he said edge of slab/framing.

I was wanting a reference point to measure across my section to the other side.

Having a quick look it seems Christchurch used to be like that but they might have removed all exemptions for bits that stick out in latest Plan.

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  # 2219784 17-Apr-2019 11:51
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Call your local council, they are all different,

 

Some allow partial projections into recession planes, some do not... Some may have a set allowance for eave incursion, others a percentage ...  + different zonings make it different too..

 

 


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  # 2219811 17-Apr-2019 12:24
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Wheelbarrow01:

 

Just call the CCC main phone number (039418999) and ask to speak to a duty planner. They are usually super helpful and can answer simple questions like this over the phone.

 

 

 

 

Best to ring them as @wheelbarrow01 says

 

 

 

Having just gone through this in Welllington, the council can give you some ideas. 


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  # 2219907 17-Apr-2019 14:42
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from the CCC site for Residential Suburban Zone, might be different depending on your zone

 

The minimum building setback from internal boundaries shall be as follows: 

 

Setback
means the distance between a building and the boundary of its site or other specified item. Boundary
means any boundary of the net site area of a site. 1. Internal boundary means any boundary of the net site area of a site other than a road boundary. Building means as the context requires:

 

     

  1. any structure or part of a structure, whether permanent, moveable or immoveable; and/or
  2. any erection, reconstruction, placement, alteration or demolition of any structure or part of any structure within, on, under or over the land; and
  3. any vehicle, trailer, tent, marquee, shipping container, caravan or boat, whether fixed or moveable, used on-site as a residential unit or place of business or storage; but

 

excludes:

 

     

  1. any scaffolding or falsework erected temporarily for maintenance or construction purposes;
  2. fences or walls that have no structural function other than as a fence or wall for boundary demarcation, privacy or windbreak purposes, of up to 2 metres in heightÍž
  3. retaining walls which are both less than 6m2 in area and less than 1.8 metres in height;
  4. structures which are both less than 6m2 in area and less than 1.8 metres in height;
  5. utility cabinets;
  6. masts, poles, radio and telephone aerials less than 6 metres above mean ground level;
  7. any public artwork located in that part of the city contained within Bealey, Fitzgerald, Moorhouse, Deans and Harper Avenues;
  8. artificial crop protection structures and crop support structures; and

 

so yes looks like it includes eaves


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  # 2219913 17-Apr-2019 14:45
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You should be able to download a copy of the district plan which should show the answers. Many are very different when it comes to this sort of thing. For example in my area, the house has to be 1.5 metres at the boundary minimum, but two boundary's have to be 6 metres. Also suggest you get everything in writing. So if you phone instead of email them, then also follow up with an email pointing out your understanding of what was discussed. This is why it is often easier to just email them.


neb

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  # 2220059 17-Apr-2019 16:42
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Paul1977:

The Christchurch City Council rules say the minimum setback from an internal boundary is 1m, but I'm not sure if that is 1m to the exterior wall or 1m to the eave.

 

 

This can get relatively complicated, in Auckland, or at least the part where I am, it's variable, you're allowed a certain height for free and beyond that draw a line at an angle inwards onto your property which defines the envelope for any structure. I'd have to go dig up the paperwork to give a more exact definition, but in any case Chch rules will be different, just pointing out that it can get complex. Then there's also absolute maximum heights, and if it's onto a neighbour's property rather than street frontage you can get an easement from them, however if it's onto a reserve it's more complicated and may require every iwi within wallet range to sign off on it, etc.

 

 

It's really best to talk to the council for something like this, mentioning specific issues like the ones above. Or get an architect to consult on it if you think it'll get complex, they know this stuff inside out, as well as the shortcuts you won't be aware of.

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  # 2220077 17-Apr-2019 18:04
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neb: This can get relatively complicated, in Auckland, or at least the part where I am, it's variable, you're allowed a certain height for free and beyond that draw a line at an angle inwards onto your property which defines the envelope for any structure. I'd have to go dig up the paperwork to give a more exact definition, but in any case Chch rules will be different, just pointing out that it can get complex.

 

thats height in relation to the boundary while not directly what they are asking it can come into play.

 

Mixed housing suburban in auckland, its 2.5m then a 45degree angle that the building must be inside, there is an alternative one which is slightly more complex.

 

 


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  # 2220183 17-Apr-2019 19:59
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As above - you have boundary setbacks and recession planes to consider, and how eaves are treated in each will vary by council. There is also fire resistance to consider, which shouldn't vary by councils.

 

This article here covers it, but essentially, you want your spouting (or any other part of the eaves) to be at least 650mm from the boundary and the wall itself at least 1m to avoid the need for specific fire resistant materials.

 

Duty planners/building consent officers are generally pretty friendly and usually operate on a drop in basis (for free). They deal with this stuff everyday and once you give them an overview of the situation they will probably think of some other implications that you would have never considered.


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  # 2220278 18-Apr-2019 00:37
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CCC has different rules for different living zones in the regional plan.

 

Details including setbacks and recession plane information can be downloaded here:

 

https://www.ccc.govt.nz/consents-and-licences/resource-consents/before-you-apply/planning-zones-and-maps/

 

So it's nowhere near as simple as some suggest, setbacks and recession planes vary according to zoning, and recession planes aren't a height and fixed angle, but depend on the direction the building is facing relative to the boundary.

 

There are drawings for calculating, and a compass for calculating recession plane on various elevations for each of the living zones.

 

But it's still not simple, especially if the section boundary isn't flat or the building is a complex design.

 

So if you and your designer are sure you're well on the safe side of things, then submit plans for building consent, and see how you go.  But if you're asking, then it's probably close, and I suspect you're going to need to get a surveyor in to check - before you waste money drawing plans and submitting a consent application that'll be rejected.

 

From a quick look, setback would include eaves, but you're allowed max 200mm guttering width to protrude into the setback area.




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  # 2220467 18-Apr-2019 10:34
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Thanks for all the feedback guys, sounds like it will be an email or phone call to the duty planner.


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