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56 posts

Master Geek


#268348 13-Mar-2020 22:29
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I replaced our ceiling downlight halogens with MR16 LEDs and LED transformers about 5 years ago, and they haven't given exactly sterling service (problems with connections, leads, and the bulbs themselves) so I'm looking at replacing them with integrated LEDs. The problem is that with most fittings legally you have to get a sparky to install them, so it would be great to get an idea whether a 2-pin plug (as on the Osram Ledvance) is becoming a standard feature: the LED economics don't look so hot if you have to get a sparky to replace them every time they flunk. The other is hole size: what's the most common size these days? My guess is the devices I buy now will not be available in 3-5 years when  I need replacements so the widest choice would be good.


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  #2437822 14-Mar-2020 08:51
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Surely replacing them is "like for like" replacement and therefore allowable by the homeowner?

 

BTW I'm not an electrician so don't know the rules exactly but I've seen that quoted on here several times.

 

I have seen some downlights with standard three-pin plugs, which would allow you to have trailing sockets fitted by a sparky just once


545 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2437894 14-Mar-2020 12:12
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LED down-lights are relatively cheap now. Have a look at the likes of Voltex as they have up to a 7 year replacement warranty(They will even cover the cost of the sparky call out for the replacement).https://www.voltexelectrical.co.nz/c-931-led-downlights.aspx


 
 
 
 


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  #2437906 14-Mar-2020 12:58
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Usually the socket and plug is needed to keep the warranty on downlights that are supplied with a plug fitted, the sockets are around $3 each so not a huge expense, but in the name of laziness I tend to just grab them at bunnings and overpay for the sockets rather than deal with a wholesaler and paying the relative with the account back.

 

Also been told that it is in no way acceptable to put a powerstrip and extension cords into the roofspace to put more downlights in, they each need their own socket, properly wired with earth present which may present a problem if you have crappy old house with no earth on the light circuits.

 

 

 

 





Richard rich.ms

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Master Geek


  #2438158 14-Mar-2020 18:09
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92mm is the most common size,13w is good option to replace the 50w MR16


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  #2438205 14-Mar-2020 19:29
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Also check if you are happy with the light output before installing them. Seems the quality has massivly gone down to match the price and most are using junky ripply power supplies now.

 

Here is a video that a friend sent me of their looking for new downlights.

 

https://twitter.com/richms/status/1238713667929042944

 

 

 

Last time I tried to embed on here it went horriibly wrong so click thru...





Richard rich.ms

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  #2438207 14-Mar-2020 19:31
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richms:

 

Usually the socket and plug is needed to keep the warranty on downlights that are supplied with a plug fitted, the sockets are around $3 each so not a huge expense, but in the name of laziness I tend to just grab them at bunnings and overpay for the sockets rather than deal with a wholesaler and paying the relative with the account back.

 

Also been told that it is in no way acceptable to put a powerstrip and extension cords into the roofspace to put more downlights in, they each need their own socket, properly wired with earth present which may present a problem if you have crappy old house with no earth on the light circuits.

 

 

Careful here, as soon as you put sockets in the ceiling for you plug in downlights, the sockets *must* be RCD protected. If you have a house built in the past 15 years you will most likely already have RCD protection. Installing RCD circuit breakers is electrician only work.

 

 

 

 


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