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xpd



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#272144 11-Jun-2020 13:32
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Got a couple days off work, so getting into some stuff that needs doing around the house.... 

 

We have a large glass window, and there only ever appears to have been putty on the bottom of it. Looking at some of the other windows, they only have it on the bottom as well.

 

Is this normal or just a sign of a lazy builder/glazier ?

 

Its possible it has come off over the years and a previous owner was just lazy and painted the frames again without redoing the putty...

 

 





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  #2502906 11-Jun-2020 13:39
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If there was putty on other sides, the glass is retained by tacks or small flat diamond shaped inserts before the putty is applied. These diamonds are small and probably rusty now but if you can see them, there should be putty.

 

If there's not putty, what keeps the breeze out?


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  #2502909 11-Jun-2020 13:43
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Here i was thinking were were going to talk bout alternatives to putty. I use kitty  - https://github.com/cyd01/KiTTY/releases

 

But on the topic... are solid do they sit in the frame? if the glass is old, you may risk breaking it and then being up for whole new panes of much more expensive glass





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  #2502931 11-Jun-2020 14:08
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elpenguino:

 

If there's not putty, what keeps the breeze out?

 

 

Or the glass in? (I know the tacks do)

 

As others have said should be puttied top, bottom, and sides. And there's a bit of an art to it if you go DIY. Like a lot of things it looks easy, but is actually quite tricky to get it just right (until you get the hang of it).

 

We used some stuff that wasn't linseed oiled based like the traditional stuff, which meant you didn't need to wait as long before painting it. Can't for the life of me remember what it was called though (just that it was any awful pinky flesh colour).


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  #2502932 11-Jun-2020 14:08
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I've seen windows with no putty along the top, but the other three sides should have it. Unless there is a beading holding the glass in?


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  #2502933 11-Jun-2020 14:09
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mentalinc:

 

Here i was thinking were were going to talk bout alternatives to putty. I use kitty  - https://github.com/cyd01/KiTTY/releases

 

 

Putty, not PuTTY!


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  #2502936 11-Jun-2020 14:10
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mdf:

 

I've seen windows with no putty along the top, but the other three sides should have it. Unless there is a beading holding the glass in?

 

 

Why would you not have it on the top?


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  #2502944 11-Jun-2020 14:24
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Paul1977:

 

mdf:

 

I've seen windows with no putty along the top, but the other three sides should have it. Unless there is a beading holding the glass in?

 

 

Why would you not have it on the top?

 

 

Didn't seem right to me either but I've seen it often enough with older windows (especially double hung sash windows) that I'm _reasonably_ convinced it isn't just a mistake.

 

From some random website:

 

 

With the two sides of the window frame off and the bottom edge cleaned, you may now be wondering why you don’t have to do the same thing along the top edge. Most traditional windows were made with a rabbet around the two sides and on the bottom, but not on the top. This is because a groove is actually cut into the top edge that the piece of glass will slide into, holding the top edge securely in place. It is important to remember that this groove exists when measuring for the new piece of glass because approximately 1/4 in. of the new pane will slide into this groove.

 


 
 
 
 


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  #2502951 11-Jun-2020 14:38
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Looking closer at the top etc, it looks like theres a thin piece of timber that goes around three sides, guess it was some alternative method to putty ? Think I'll putty over it all anyway, wont hurt. 

 

Dosent look like any real care has been done with maintenance in the house's 40 year life...... just "slap that on there it'll be right".

 

 





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  #2502955 11-Jun-2020 14:43
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xpd:

 

Looking closer at the top etc, it looks like theres a thin piece of timber that goes around three sides, guess it was some alternative method to putty ? Think I'll putty over it all anyway, wont hurt. 

 

Dosent look like any real care has been done with maintenance in the house's 40 year life...... just "slap that on there it'll be right".

 

 

If it is a narrow gap, I wouldn't use putty. Takes too long to dry (2-4 week overcoat time) and is a PITA to get neat. I'd be inclined to use a paint over silicone caulk, but you'd need to check the label for stick-to-it-ed-ness and paint-overability.


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  #2503012 11-Jun-2020 15:13
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mdf:

 

 

 

If it is a narrow gap, I wouldn't use putty. Takes too long to dry (2-4 week overcoat time) and is a PITA to get neat. I'd be inclined to use a paint over silicone caulk, but you'd need to check the label for stick-to-it-ed-ness and paint-overability.

 

 

I wish I could remember the name of the stuff I used, I'm sure you could paint over it after a couple of days. Putty can be a PITA to get neat, but I've never had any luck getting a neat finish with silicon - I always mess it up.


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  #2503037 11-Jun-2020 16:06
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If the glass is laminated (likely with a large frame if done over the past few decades), then they may have used wooden beads to hold the glass, usually with a foam tape at the back to seal.  Reason to not use standard glazing putty - the linseed oil attacks the laminate layer breaking it down at the edges - looks unsightly.  The bottom bead may be bevelled so that water runs off - rather than seep in behind the bead and into the frame.


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  #2503043 11-Jun-2020 16:17
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mdf:

 

Didn't seem right to me either but I've seen it often enough with older windows (especially double hung sash windows) that I'm _reasonably_ convinced it isn't just a mistake.

 

 

This can be tested by turning music up if you've got a sub-woofer.  They rattle. (Have double hung sash windows which are otherwise excellent, but need to turn the latch hard enough to put some pressure on the top of the bottom frame which probably puts enough pressure on the glass to stop it rattling.  I'd fix it - but it's a bit of a mission to get the frames out, maybe a bead of neutral-cure silicone from the inside could work - but would make future re-varnishing a problem).


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