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51 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 215001 8-Jun-2017 00:26
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I am using the primary and secondary DNS numbers provided by DNS4ME.NET. Everything works fine, it is just that my router resets itself overnight and every single day I have to key in the DNS numbers before I can get streaming going, which is becoming a pain. How can I prevent my router from resetting itself?

 

Any help would be much appreciated. Many thanks.

 

EDIT: I am using a NetComm wireless router - NB604N


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  Reply # 1796322 8-Jun-2017 01:38
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Is it provisioned by your ISP or one you bought yourself?





Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 1796334 8-Jun-2017 07:09
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Who is your ISP? My pick would be you're using an autoprovisioned device that reprovisions itself every day. Since using 3rd party DNS servers carries significant disadvantages for everyday browsing, video and downloads it's one way of maintaining the end user experience.

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1796356 8-Jun-2017 08:52
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sbiddle:

 

Who is your ISP? My pick would be you're using an autoprovisioned device that reprovisions itself every day. Since using 3rd party DNS servers carries significant disadvantages for everyday browsing, video and downloads it's one way of maintaining the end user experience.

 

 

 

 

Bold above - why is that? I can understand with a VPN service where all your internet traffic goes via the VPN, but I thought with a DNS redirector, only your initial web query was sent to the DNS server to see if it is a URL you have asked to have redirected, if not your web request is processed through normal paths. Even if it is an internet site you have requested to be redirected I understood once the initial redirection had been accepted, the actual video would then play via a normal internet route (sorry I have probably not used the correct terms/jargon).


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  Reply # 1796402 8-Jun-2017 09:08
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steve2222:

 

sbiddle:

 

Who is your ISP? My pick would be you're using an autoprovisioned device that reprovisions itself every day. Since using 3rd party DNS servers carries significant disadvantages for everyday browsing, video and downloads it's one way of maintaining the end user experience.

 

 

 

 

Bold above - why is that? I can understand with a VPN service where all your internet traffic goes via the VPN, but I thought with a DNS redirector, only your initial web query was sent to the DNS server to see if it is a URL you have asked to have redirected, if not your web request is processed through normal paths. Even if it is an internet site you have requested to be redirected I understood once the initial redirection had been accepted, the actual video would then play via a normal internet route (sorry I have probably not used the correct terms/jargon).

 

 

That's exactly how it works. And that's exactly the problem.

 

Up until 1-2 years ago using a 3rd party DNS such as Google or OpenDNS should never be contemplated because it would significantly impact your Internet experience. Things have gotten a lot better as more DNS services have become CDN aware, but using a 3rd party DNS service can still impact the everyday experience.

 

Firstly the Internet these days revolves around CDN's, many of which are located within an ISP network. Many ISP's in NZ for example have their own Google cache and Netflix cache which delivers YouTube and Netflix locally from within their network. If you're using a 3rd party DNS it may not redirect you to these local caches simply because it doesn't know about them. This can mean your traffic could come from a different location (which may not even be in the same country) and deliver a sub optimal experience.

 

Secondly your ISP DNS is typically far closer than 3rd party DNS - if you've got an ISP DNS server that's 5ms away and a 3rd party DNS that's 50ms away then you'll see it can slow down browsing significantly as every new DNS lookup takes 50ms to process.


mdf

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  Reply # 1796507 8-Jun-2017 10:41
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sbiddle:

steve2222:


sbiddle:


Who is your ISP? My pick would be you're using an autoprovisioned device that reprovisions itself every day. Since using 3rd party DNS servers carries significant disadvantages for everyday browsing, video and downloads it's one way of maintaining the end user experience.


 



Bold above - why is that? I can understand with a VPN service where all your internet traffic goes via the VPN, but I thought with a DNS redirector, only your initial web query was sent to the DNS server to see if it is a URL you have asked to have redirected, if not your web request is processed through normal paths. Even if it is an internet site you have requested to be redirected I understood once the initial redirection had been accepted, the actual video would then play via a normal internet route (sorry I have probably not used the correct terms/jargon).



That's exactly how it works. And that's exactly the problem.


Up until 1-2 years ago using a 3rd party DNS such as Google or OpenDNS should never be contemplated because it would significantly impact your Internet experience. Things have gotten a lot better as more DNS services have become CDN aware, but using a 3rd party DNS service can still impact the everyday experience.


Firstly the Internet these days revolves around CDN's, many of which are located within an ISP network. Many ISP's in NZ for example have their own Google cache and Netflix cache which delivers YouTube and Netflix locally from within their network. If you're using a 3rd party DNS it may not redirect you to these local caches simply because it doesn't know about them. This can mean your traffic could come from a different location (which may not even be in the same country) and deliver a sub optimal experience.


Secondly your ISP DNS is typically far closer than 3rd party DNS - if you've got an ISP DNS server that's 5ms away and a 3rd party DNS that's 50ms away then you'll see it can slow down browsing significantly as every new DNS lookup takes 50ms to process.



Great answer. I didn't know about the impact of CDNs on DNS. Any chance of making this post a sticky?

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  Reply # 1796606 8-Jun-2017 13:08
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mdf:
sbiddle:

 

steve2222:

 

 

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

Who is your ISP? My pick would be you're using an autoprovisioned device that reprovisions itself every day. Since using 3rd party DNS servers carries significant disadvantages for everyday browsing, video and downloads it's one way of maintaining the end user experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bold above - why is that? I can understand with a VPN service where all your internet traffic goes via the VPN, but I thought with a DNS redirector, only your initial web query was sent to the DNS server to see if it is a URL you have asked to have redirected, if not your web request is processed through normal paths. Even if it is an internet site you have requested to be redirected I understood once the initial redirection had been accepted, the actual video would then play via a normal internet route (sorry I have probably not used the correct terms/jargon).

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's exactly how it works. And that's exactly the problem.

 

 

 

Up until 1-2 years ago using a 3rd party DNS such as Google or OpenDNS should never be contemplated because it would significantly impact your Internet experience. Things have gotten a lot better as more DNS services have become CDN aware, but using a 3rd party DNS service can still impact the everyday experience.

 

 

 

Firstly the Internet these days revolves around CDN's, many of which are located within an ISP network. Many ISP's in NZ for example have their own Google cache and Netflix cache which delivers YouTube and Netflix locally from within their network. If you're using a 3rd party DNS it may not redirect you to these local caches simply because it doesn't know about them. This can mean your traffic could come from a different location (which may not even be in the same country) and deliver a sub optimal experience.

 

 

 

Secondly your ISP DNS is typically far closer than 3rd party DNS - if you've got an ISP DNS server that's 5ms away and a 3rd party DNS that's 50ms away then you'll see it can slow down browsing significantly as every new DNS lookup takes 50ms to process.

 



Great answer. I didn't know about the impact of CDNs on DNS. Any chance of making this post a sticky?

 

There are literally hundreds of posts on here describing this very same thing. I don't think this is the best explanation of the issues.

 

 




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  Reply # 1796611 8-Jun-2017 13:12
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I am with Slingshot. The router I am using has been initially sold to another Slingshot customer by Slingshot and I bought it off her about a year or so ago. It doesn't look like it has been branded to Slingshot (except for the sticker on top), but a standard off-the-shelf router that you could buy from an IT store.


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  Reply # 1796628 8-Jun-2017 13:44
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Have you checked what version of firmware its running?

 

The Netcomm site shows there is a R4B032 version for NZ dated 4/5/2017

 

Would be a good idea to check all your settings (do you need authentication details on your internet connection (what is your connection? ADSL/UFB?). Wifi SSID name and password etc

 

I would assume that if it had Slingshot specific firmware installed, then installing this latest package should wipe that.

 

Possibly worth a factory reset as well afterwards - you would then need to set up the correct settings to get it connected again - so you need to have the details on hand....





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler

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