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Topic # 129148 5-Sep-2013 10:35
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Back in "my day" motorcycle gears were changed using the 1-down/5 or 6-up style foot rocker. 

Watching some MotoGP racing recently I noticed that the riders' left foot never moved, so are racing cycles automatic these days?

Also, do modern cycles require the use of a clutch (other than starting off) for gear changes?

R.

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  Reply # 890202 5-Sep-2013 11:12
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No idea, but some are. A friend commutes on a big Honda that is automatic. 

Makes perfect sense to me.





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  Reply # 890207 5-Sep-2013 11:19
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Still the same today but use a quick shifter

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 890208 5-Sep-2013 11:22
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The gearboxes now use "seamless shifting" where the next gear is partially engaged before the change. Most of the info concentrates on the gearbox internals but if bicycles can have electric shifting I can't see why the rider couldn't have buttons and/or shift pedals.



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  Reply # 890209 5-Sep-2013 11:22
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John,

Quick shifter?

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  Reply # 890255 5-Sep-2013 12:23
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Road going bikes will use the 1 down/5 up system, but race bikes (depending on the machine) are a different kettle of fish. They use what is called race pattern (1 up/5 down) and a modern form of a quick shift which cuts the engine when the lever is pressed allowing for the shift. Newer machines might have two clutches which allow for pre-selection of the gears. Also, the clutches may be of the slipper type in order to deal with back-torque.




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