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Topic # 198264 2-Jul-2016 14:26
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Often the no-name brands are slightly cheaper than budget range of a "trusted" brand eg Hancook ...

 

You would buy the budget Hancook vs say a Federal - right? Thinking of getting new tyres for wintery south island conditions ... conditions where chains are overkill but open road can be frosty in places. Note not mentioning black ice because any vs black ice = loss of control.

 

*desperately typing in tyre brands, tyre models into google ...* my tyre size is incredibly hard to come by! Estima 215 60 17





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  Reply # 1584638 2-Jul-2016 14:32
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May I just rattle out some brands and can anyone say if they are trusted or not

 

current tyres: Accelera Iota front, rear GT Champiro VP1

 

 





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  Reply # 1584639 2-Jul-2016 14:34
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personally  I steer clear of cheep tyres, and by cheap I mean imported tyres of doubtful pedigree etc. I tend to stick with the manufactures recommended tyre. The tyres are key component in safety and don't compromise with that. I suggest looking for discounted known brands that meet your budget.





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  Reply # 1584646 2-Jul-2016 14:48
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Thing is there are many brands I have never heard of that are actually "trusted". Like I've never heard of Hancook, Toyo, but apparently they are "good" brands. I presume Goodride is not? Thing is Bridgestone, Goodyear, Dunlop at the Beaurepaires don't sell my tyre size. They did have a Michelin one ... at $330 a pop! Look I'm not taking these to go racing at the local track for the gold medal! They did say they can source a Goodyear one but it is for commercial vans hence not what I want. ???

 

I will try other shops, armed with "brand" knowledge, I guess I will reverse engineer by getting the model and prices, then comparing them. Ideally I'm after an All-Season one that works down to -6 degrees C. Apparently summer tyres work down to 7C, All Seasons down to -6 C, winter tyres up to 10C (but the cut is aggressive to trap and hence grip snow, which would be nice but what do I do when the temps go over 10C!).





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  Reply # 1584648 2-Jul-2016 15:11
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Hankook tyres are a reputable brand, although they are a bit uncommon in NZ. I think they are on par with Yokohama and Entry level Bridgestone tyres.


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  Reply # 1584649 2-Jul-2016 15:12
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I have good rides here, the directional sv series are very good value for money. On my Passat I had $110 each tyres and honestly never had a single issue they were from mag n turbo, before that I had Bridgetown potenzas, they were $210 each. And really they both felt the same, the potenzas were quite etc though . If you are just doing daily driving you can compromise by going mid range instead of budget tier, especially since your in the south like me. I have Kingstar directionals on my golf now and they are very very good.

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  Reply # 1584651 2-Jul-2016 15:15
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I had a similar issue to you - uncommon(ish) size - 215/45R18 

 

Firestone wanted $330ish a tyre.

 

I used that as a starting point and did some ringing around/emailing.

 

Got it down to $200 fitted for a Chinese brand (can't remember which exactly). Settled on a set of Falkens at $230ish each fitted from Discount Tyres. I found their service, and Tony's both to be really good. I understand Tony's is part of Firestone/Bridgestone now.


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  Reply # 1584652 2-Jul-2016 15:23
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My first thought.
If the tire size is that hard to come by, change it. There will be a range of sizes that fit your rims, ask them to price up something more common that will fit.




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  Reply # 1584656 2-Jul-2016 15:36
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215/55/17 would be more suitable

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  Reply # 1584733 2-Jul-2016 17:43
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Blairs are the importers of the budget chinese brand Goodride in NZ. Their "premium" korean brand is Kumho, I think they still import Pirelli also.

There are huge tradeoffs in tyres, traction/longevity/noise. Usually the cheap ones last forever and never grip the road, and the expensive ones have great traction and don't last so long.

It really just depends on how you drive, and how much you value your life.

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  Reply # 1584735 2-Jul-2016 17:53
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I bought some tyres (roadstone) fairly cheap and they are fine. It's hard to find a non-suv tyre in 235/60x16, but these stick like glue considering the way I drive and the car weighs over 2000kg.


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  Reply # 1584809 2-Jul-2016 19:57
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ludez: 215/55/17 would be more suitable


This seems to be mentioned on some sites as oem 17 size not 215 60.

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  Reply # 1584823 2-Jul-2016 20:08
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For frosty conditions (assuming winter tires aren't an option), I would be looking for something that is sold as an "All Season" tire overseas (although they are typically not marketed as such in NZ.

 

They normally have "M+S" on the sidewall (in small writing).

 

Note that most tires that are sold in NZ are Summer tires.

 

I have GT Radial Champiro 228's on my car. They are a good touring tire from a reputable manufacturer, but being a Chinese brand were much cheaper than the similar tires from Bridgestone etc. I got them because they really good in consumers test for wet breaking and wet cornering, but they also happen to be all seasons (not that I care, given I live in Auckland).

 

 

 

Goodyear has this to say.

 

Summer vs. All-season tires

 

Summer tires:

 

Summer tires are designed for optimal performance at temperatures above 7 °C.

 

These tires typically use a soft rubber compound that delivers good grip and handling on both dry and wet roads.

 

However, this same compound makes summer tires less suitable in winter weather conditions below 7 °C.

 

Choose a summer tire if:

 

You want to maximize your vehicle’s handling and performance during milder months
You have a set of winter tires for colder months
You experience very mild winters with temperatures remaining above 7 °C (allowing you to use summer tires all year long)
All-season tires:

 

All season tires offer a reasonable compromise between the performance of dedicated summer and winter tires. They are a viable option for regions with moderate winter weather (light snowfall, with temperatures rarely dropping below freezing). Goodyear all-season tires meet high standards for performance in winter conditions and bear the same ‘M+S‘ and ‘Snowflake’ designations as winter tires. This means they are acceptable for winter use where winter tires are required by law.

 

Choose an all-season tire if:

 

You live where winter temperatures don’t drop below -5 °C (if they do, you should buy winter tires)
You want to use the same set of tires year round
You’re unable to store and fit a second set of tires
For optimal performance in winter conditions, we recommend fitting a set of dedicated winter tires.

 

 

 

[EDIT] 

 

The tires I have are not available in 215/60R17 (but are in 215/55R17). If you are considering changing from OEM size, be careful with the load rating, I imagine it is easy to load a lot of weight into a people mover. For example the Gt radial 228's in 215/55R17 are rated at 670kg (each tire). Where as, in the 215/60R17 GT radial has two offerings, one a lower end toruing tire, the other a long life focused tire, they have load ratings of 690kg/710kg's respectively.

(That said, the Previa has a GVM (laden weigh) of 2430kg, which is just 608kg per tire is evenly distributed.) 




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  Reply # 1584884 2-Jul-2016 21:56
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Bung:
ludez: 215/55/17 would be more suitable


This seems to be mentioned on some sites as oem 17 size not 215 60.

 

Hmm ... wow indeed! That would explain why it's such a rare size! 

 

If I only changed 2 tyres to 55 profile ... with the other at 60 profile, would that be illegal?





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  Reply # 1584887 2-Jul-2016 21:58
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Scott3:

 

For frosty conditions (assuming winter tires aren't an option), I would be looking for something that is sold as an "All Season" tire overseas (although they are typically not marketed as such in NZ.

 

They normally have "M+S" on the sidewall (in small writing).

 

Note that most tires that are sold in NZ are Summer tires.

 

I have GT Radial Champiro 228's on my car. They are a good touring tire from a reputable manufacturer, but being a Chinese brand were much cheaper than the similar tires from Bridgestone etc. I got them because they really good in consumers test for wet breaking and wet cornering, but they also happen to be all seasons (not that I care, given I live in Auckland).

 

 

 

Goodyear has this to say.

 

Summer vs. All-season tires

 

Summer tires:

 

Summer tires are designed for optimal performance at temperatures above 7 °C.

 

These tires typically use a soft rubber compound that delivers good grip and handling on both dry and wet roads.

 

However, this same compound makes summer tires less suitable in winter weather conditions below 7 °C.

 

Choose a summer tire if:

 

You want to maximize your vehicle’s handling and performance during milder months
You have a set of winter tires for colder months
You experience very mild winters with temperatures remaining above 7 °C (allowing you to use summer tires all year long)
All-season tires:

 

All season tires offer a reasonable compromise between the performance of dedicated summer and winter tires. They are a viable option for regions with moderate winter weather (light snowfall, with temperatures rarely dropping below freezing). Goodyear all-season tires meet high standards for performance in winter conditions and bear the same ‘M+S‘ and ‘Snowflake’ designations as winter tires. This means they are acceptable for winter use where winter tires are required by law.

 

Choose an all-season tire if:

 

You live where winter temperatures don’t drop below -5 °C (if they do, you should buy winter tires)
You want to use the same set of tires year round
You’re unable to store and fit a second set of tires
For optimal performance in winter conditions, we recommend fitting a set of dedicated winter tires.

 

 

 

[EDIT] 

 

The tires I have are not available in 215/60R17 (but are in 215/55R17). If you are considering changing from OEM size, be careful with the load rating, I imagine it is easy to load a lot of weight into a people mover. For example the Gt radial 228's in 215/55R17 are rated at 670kg (each tire). Where as, in the 215/60R17 GT radial has two offerings, one a lower end toruing tire, the other a long life focused tire, they have load ratings of 690kg/710kg's respectively.

(That said, the Previa has a GVM (laden weigh) of 2430kg, which is just 608kg per tire is evenly distributed.) 

 

 

I have a sneaky feeling that Chinese All Season cheats somewhere and may not be as effective at -5C as Goodyear. But I have no proof.





Swype on iOS is detrimental to accurate typing. Apologies in advance.


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  Reply # 1584907 2-Jul-2016 22:56
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joker97:

 

Hmm ... wow indeed! That would explain why it's such a rare size! 

 

If I only changed 2 tyres to 55 profile ... with the other at 60 profile, would that be illegal?

 

 

https://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/tyres,-wheels-and-hubs/tyres-and-wheels

 

Technically, as long as the tires on the same axle match, I can't see where you would fail a WOF.

Staggered tires setups (wider on rear) are common on performance cars. Vans & trucks often have a smaller tires (in dual configuration - i.e. 4 per axle) in the rear compared the front (where you can't do dual tires to share load) to allow a lower low bed.

 

 

 

That said, I would strongly recommend NOT running tires of different rolling diameter on your people mover (or any vehicle not designed for it).

 

For starters your vehicle would have a slight uphill or downhill lean, messing up the headlight angle, The different wheel speeds could confuse up your car's ABS system too...


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