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Topic # 232223 5-Apr-2018 15:09
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I have a light trailer that I use 2-3 times per year on the open road with a 200kg load
It has wheels the same as my car so I don't have to carry two spares
The 205/55/16 tyres need to be replaced.

 

I'm not buying performance tyres and given the light weight I'm not sure commercial tyres are warranted but figured I'd open it up for any comments?


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  Reply # 1988829 5-Apr-2018 15:34
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200kg is nothing.  Just make sure the same sort of tyre is on both sides and the load rating is appropriate.  

 

https://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general-trailers/tyres,-wheels-and-hubs/tyres-and-wheels

 

 





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  Reply # 1988830 5-Apr-2018 15:34
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How worn are your car tyres?

 

May be a good opportunity to get a couple of decent, nice, shiny fresh tyres for the car and cascade the old (if legal and usable) ones down to the trailer which should give you a few years on there.





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  Reply # 1988845 5-Apr-2018 16:20
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I suspect you have a Mazda 6. There should be heaps of secondhand tyres around in that size. The factory fitment tyres were 104 load rating from memory, which was good for around 1.5 tonne for a pair. I sourced a set on alloys for the boat trailer a few years back.



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  Reply # 1989041 5-Apr-2018 20:17
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Sounds like the consensus is used car tyres. I just wonder if its worth the $18+ fitting charge per wheel vs a bit more for new cheapies?

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  Reply # 1989088 5-Apr-2018 22:14
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floydbloke:

How worn are your car tyres?


May be a good opportunity to get a couple of decent, nice, shiny fresh tyres for the car and cascade the old (if legal and usable) ones down to the trailer which should give you a few years on there.



This^^^^

As trailer tyres in your use situation fail WOF mostly for things like impact damage and cracks due to old age. As the trailer doesn't put any acceleration or braking forces on its tyres. (assuming your trailer is unbraked of course)

Also makes it easier to get matching tyres on the car if they are a mixture of brands.





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  Reply # 1989090 5-Apr-2018 22:20
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Check factory wheels and tires on trademe before paying fitting. That seems expensive compared the the frequently found 4 wheels and tires for $100 that comes up. Plus if your trailers wheels are crappy steel painted junk thats rusting like mine are, then you can get some factory aluminium wheels to replace them and look better and not have worries about rusty wheels at wof time.





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  Reply # 1989091 5-Apr-2018 22:21

Floyd had a good idea.

 

I know it can be handy having your own trailer, but what about selling the trailer and hiring one on the couple of times each year that you need it?

 

Saves on rego, insurance, wof's etc.


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  Reply # 1989099 5-Apr-2018 22:36
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My trailer is probably heavier - it's rated to 3500kg. It is fitted with German made GT Radial KargoMax trailer tyres, which are specially designed for trailers with particular emphasis on the fact that trailer tyres often sit unused for long periods and if normal tyres are used, the casings can degrade due to climatic conditions etc (or so it says on their website).








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  Reply # 1989176 6-Apr-2018 07:21
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k1w1k1d:

 

Floyd had a good idea.

 

I know it can be handy having your own trailer, but what about selling the trailer and hiring one on the couple of times each year that you need it?

 

Saves on rego, insurance, wof's etc.

 

 

Good thinking but I take the trailer away for 9 days total on those 2 occasions




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  Reply # 1989178 6-Apr-2018 07:28
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Geektastic:

 

My trailer is probably heavier - it's rated to 3500kg. It is fitted with German made GT Radial KargoMax trailer tyres, which are specially designed for trailers with particular emphasis on the fact that trailer tyres often sit unused for long periods and if normal tyres are used, the casings can degrade due to climatic conditions etc (or so it says on their website).

 

 

Yeah heavy loads need tyres with stiffer sidewalls, mine is so light I can use wheels and tyres that match my car so I don't need to carry another spare.

 

Not good for any tyre to sit around unused especially outside and trailer tyres tend to crack (like mine) long before the tread wears out.


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  Reply # 1989228 6-Apr-2018 09:07
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Cracking sidewalls isn't necessarily an indication that the tyres are unsafe.  scuwp above gives a link to NZTA WOF regulations:

 

 

 a cut or crack in a sidewall or tread more than 25mm long that reaches the cords, or exposed or cut cords

 

 

You can get covers to protect trailer tyres, or just use some plywood or whatever to keep the sun off them.

 

That said, as tyres age then the tread tends to harden, wet grip in particular suffers - I've dumped sets of tyres with good tread depth and which looked fine because the wet grip was dangerous, IIRC they were expensive Michelins that were probably original fitment on a low km jap import 10 years old. 

 

There's a 4 digit date code embossed on tyre sidewalls. For example "1015" refers to 10th week of 2015. 

 

That said, I wouldn't be overly concerned about grip/wet grip on a lightweight unbraked trailer - there are probably 1001 more likely ways to come "unstuck" when towing than having the trailer slide sideways.

 

 


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  Reply # 1989405 6-Apr-2018 11:42
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Gemini:

 

Geektastic:

 

My trailer is probably heavier - it's rated to 3500kg. It is fitted with German made GT Radial KargoMax trailer tyres, which are specially designed for trailers with particular emphasis on the fact that trailer tyres often sit unused for long periods and if normal tyres are used, the casings can degrade due to climatic conditions etc (or so it says on their website).

 

 

Yeah heavy loads need tyres with stiffer sidewalls, mine is so light I can use wheels and tyres that match my car so I don't need to carry another spare.

 

Not good for any tyre to sit around unused especially outside and trailer tyres tend to crack (like mine) long before the tread wears out.

 

 

 

 

That's why those tyres are built like this

 

"Its innovative carcass structure, the shoulder design and the special ozone-resistant rubber compound offer the best possible protection against climatic influences during extended stand-still periods."

 

 

 

I understand your logic vis a vis spares, but car tyres are not really designed to be used as trailer tyres. The ST-4000 version of this tyre is meant for light trailers.








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  Reply # 1989654 6-Apr-2018 18:32
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What do they cost?



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  Reply # 1992507 10-Apr-2018 08:32
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How about used runflats. They have stiff sidewalls like a purpose built trailer tyre?


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  Reply # 1992515 10-Apr-2018 08:56
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k1w1k1d:

 

Floyd had a good idea.

 

I know it can be handy having your own trailer, but what about selling the trailer and hiring one on the couple of times each year that you need it?

 

Saves on rego, insurance, wof's etc.

 

 

It costs me ~$50 every three years to WOF my boat trailer.  It has brakes so may be more expensive than a household trailer. It costs me ~$36 per year to licence it.  So let's call it ~$50 per year, going up to ~$80 as it ages and requires more regular WOFs.

 

Most car insurance policies include cover for a basic trailer (but usually not for the load).

 

 

 

 

 

 





Mike

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