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489 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 242416 27-Oct-2018 15:34
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So I cleverly lost one of my two key gobs at Piha beach.  Black key FOB in black sand not a good mix.  My wife was stoked when i called her to ask her to come out to Piha with the spare, especially as she had decided to go Waiwera for the day.   So all the way from Waiwera to piha and then back to our home on the shore.

 

So I did this probably 6 months ago and have been putting off getting a replacement cause its so expensive.. BMW want about $500.

 

Its a 2007 E65 model and I have been starting to read about cloning keys etc.. 

 

I guess I am just wondering if anyone here happens to have done this , has the equipment or knows of anyone that can do this?

 

I am thinking about buying the stuff as it works out to about the same as BMW anyway but if someone already has it or can do it way cheaper than BMW I'd prefer that route.

 

 

 

Thanks!


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2115348 28-Oct-2018 11:36
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I am very keen to see if there is an open market resolution for this. 

 

My Mercedes pile of bolts has only one key.  Key number two is available only in the country where the car is and from Mercedes themselves after security checks on the person asking for the key.  Probably appropriate for very valuable cars.  Many Germans drive to Poland where the cartel and restrictive trade practices are weaker to obtain a new key for a better price.  Even to have a second mechanical blade duplicate made here is disproportionately expensive coloured by the fact that original keys are made from software with the click of a mouse at Mercedes in Germany.  Real Lock smiths can buy into this system to make a key from a VIN number elevating the cost to $40 plus for a copy made at a shopping mall.  

 

There is no denying that the security systems stacked into my key are clever.  Too clever for the fact that they might have been hacked already and a genuine bought and paid for additional key may not work.  Definitely not worth the risk at almost any lowest price for my secondhand import scrap car from Japan.

 

 

 

Blanks are cheap from China and a minimalist milling machine is less than $300 delivered. 

 

A copy of the Fob circuit board can be had for less than $50.  I believe the full program of the security of the original key is locked in one programmable read only memory chip in the genuine Fob that can be physically shifted to the copy Fob.

 

I believe that there is facility within the system to recognize if there is a copy key rather than another legal key in the sequence of genuine keys being used.  Perhaps then the car self destructs in thirty seconds.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 2115458 28-Oct-2018 17:17
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I am interested in this also. My Range Rover is from just after the BMW ownership period (or the tail end of it) and the locking system is the infra red one from the BMW parts bin.

 

It's very annoying as the range is actually very short: part of the reason I think is  that the car was a Japanese order and they have - or had then at least - some quaint restriction on radio keys.

 

The dealer gave me one original key and one replacement that looks third party which is coded to start the vehicle but which has no remote unlock ability, so I want another proper one. 






 
 
 
 


Murray River
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  Reply # 2115461 28-Oct-2018 17:24
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Geektastic:

 

no remote unlock ability, so I want another proper one. 

 

 

What year is it?

 

If it starts the car, you should be able to remote unlock by pairing the key to your car again.

 

 


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  Reply # 2115557 28-Oct-2018 18:39
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blakamin:

Geektastic:


no remote unlock ability, so I want another proper one. 



What year is it?


If it starts the car, you should be able to remote unlock by pairing the key to your car again.


 



2006/7.

No because that key has no electronics other than the immobiliser chip. There are no lock/unlock buttons.





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  Reply # 2115568 28-Oct-2018 19:08
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$500 is cheap. I wonder why there isn't a queue a mile long outside your dealership.




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489 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2115570 28-Oct-2018 19:15
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Batman: $500 is cheap. I wonder why there isn't a queue a mile long outside your dealership.

 

 

 

Not sure if you are trying to be funny.

 

Considering the virgin keys are on ebay for $20 which probably means they are made for $5 or less, I don't consider $500 cheap.

 

It is the biggest rort ever when it takes 2 minutes to code them, as demonstrated on youtube in many videos.


Murray River
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  Reply # 2115572 28-Oct-2018 19:25
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Geektastic:
blakamin:

 

Geektastic:

 

 

 

no remote unlock ability, so I want another proper one. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What year is it?

 

 

 

If it starts the car, you should be able to remote unlock by pairing the key to your car again.

 

 

 

 

 



2006/7.

No because that key has no electronics other than the immobiliser chip. There are no lock/unlock buttons.

 

 

 

That'll do it.




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2115574 28-Oct-2018 19:27
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GGJohnstone:

 

I am very keen to see if there is an open market resolution for this. 

 

My Mercedes pile of bolts has only one key.  Key number two is available only in the country where the car is and from Mercedes themselves after security checks on the person asking for the key.  Probably appropriate for very valuable cars.  Many Germans drive to Poland where the cartel and restrictive trade practices are weaker to obtain a new key for a better price.  Even to have a second mechanical blade duplicate made here is disproportionately expensive coloured by the fact that original keys are made from software with the click of a mouse at Mercedes in Germany.  Real Lock smiths can buy into this system to make a key from a VIN number elevating the cost to $40 plus for a copy made at a shopping mall.  

 

There is no denying that the security systems stacked into my key are clever.  Too clever for the fact that they might have been hacked already and a genuine bought and paid for additional key may not work.  Definitely not worth the risk at almost any lowest price for my secondhand import scrap car from Japan.

 

 

 

Blanks are cheap from China and a minimalist milling machine is less than $300 delivered. 

 

A copy of the Fob circuit board can be had for less than $50.  I believe the full program of the security of the original key is locked in one programmable read only memory chip in the genuine Fob that can be physically shifted to the copy Fob.

 

I believe that there is facility within the system to recognize if there is a copy key rather than another legal key in the sequence of genuine keys being used.  Perhaps then the car self destructs in thirty seconds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interesting part you bring up.

 

 

 

BMW for example can have 10 keys mapped to the car.  10 positions... You could make 100 clones of key 1 i guess.

 

If someone buys a key programmer and reprogrammes the BMW CAS (car unit) with new keys... BMW has no idea about this.  That means any future keys they send will not work with the BMW.

 

It means beware of second hand cars/imports etc.

 

The BMW dealer can potentially send you keys that are useless, they are dealing with the factory recorded keys at date of manufacture.

 

This is likely with other makes other than BMW.\

 

That isn't displayed anywhere.......

 

 

 

 


Mad Scientist
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  Reply # 2115645 28-Oct-2018 21:08
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Kilack:

 

Batman: $500 is cheap. I wonder why there isn't a queue a mile long outside your dealership.

 

 

 

Not sure if you are trying to be funny.

 

Considering the virgin keys are on ebay for $20 which probably means they are made for $5 or less, I don't consider $500 cheap.

 

It is the biggest rort ever when it takes 2 minutes to code them, as demonstrated on youtube in many videos.

 

 

Wasn't there a thread where the poster had a toyota estima and the dealer wanted IIRC $1000+ for a new key?





Swype on iOS is detrimental to accurate typing. Apologies in advance.


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