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Topic # 121067 23-Jun-2013 12:59
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Been googling on this topic after a chat with someone as I've just installed Cat6 in my place and he's been planning for a long time but haven't began the work yet. 

Re: HDMI.  This requires 2x Cat6 cable runs right?  So that means a lot of cable runs to a room if one is going to be using a computer and maybe a phone as well?  Instead of HDMI could one just use a single Cat6 and stream video or would that be inferior?

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  Reply # 841945 23-Jun-2013 14:08
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Hi, exactly what are you trying to connect from where to where, yes 2x cat6 is normally required to provision HDMI over cat6, but depending on what you are trying to connect/stream it may make sense to do something different.

Also if the runs are under 20m I always prefer to use actual HDMI cables rather than cat6 as the adaptors are not cheap and can be temperamental.

Cyril



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  Reply # 841952 23-Jun-2013 14:33
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no particular use in mind, was just a general chat we had how in the future home entertainment might use cat cable for hdmi and how my cat6 future proofs that over cat5.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 841954 23-Jun-2013 14:37
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Hi, as I said IMO if you are running new cables, (ie gib off walls) then if you want an HDMI run then use that rather than cat5e/6 assuming the runs are under 20m of actual cable.

Cyril



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  Reply # 841957 23-Jun-2013 14:45
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Is there a performance drop if we dont use hdmi, we can stream high def with 100Mbps Ethernet. Or does the future entail more than that?

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  Reply # 841959 23-Jun-2013 15:00
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Hi, HD video depending on the codec used rarely exceeds 20Mb/s, the actual data rate off a Blue ray disc (ie all parallel video and audio streams combined) is only 36Mb/s, so streaming HD on a 100Mb/s fast ethernet connection (let alone gigabit) is trivial.

However if you want to get HD video from say a Mysky HDi box then you will need HDMI as you cannot stream from said box.

Personally I find it better to have a DVD/BD player at each AV location rather than a centralized player that is distributed via HDMI to various locations. And for streamed material of hard discs etc, then a wired fast or gigabit lan is way more than adequate.

Cyril

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  Reply # 841972 23-Jun-2013 15:54
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cyril7: Hi, exactly what are you trying to connect from where to where, yes 2x cat6 is normally required to provision HDMI over cat6, but depending on what you are trying to connect/stream it may make sense to do something different.

Also if the runs are under 20m I always prefer to use actual HDMI cables rather than cat6 as the adaptors are not cheap and can be temperamental.

Cyril


There are 1 cable solutions, eg, I bought this...

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10110&cs_id=1011012&p_id=8122&seq=1&format=2


You're right that the adaptors can be temperamental , I think it relates to devices in the HDCP chain not compliant with HDCP standards and/or flaws in the HDCP design specs.   I get an issue every few months requiring an ordered restart of all devices in the hdcp chain to fix blue screen dropouts. 



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  Reply # 841980 23-Jun-2013 15:58
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rayonline: Is there a performance drop if we dont use hdmi, we can stream high def with 100Mbps Ethernet. Or does the future entail more than that?


It really depends how you want to steam the content and what your requirements and budget are.

In many ways you're better off distributing all content via DVB-T in HD around the home as all TV's have DVB-T tuners in them these days, but this isn't a cheap option.


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  Reply # 841981 23-Jun-2013 15:58
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Hi, yep you can get single cable solutions, but they increase the complexity of what should be a simple connection. As mentioned where possible, just use a straight forward HDMI cable rather than add another layer of complexity to an already delicate interconnect.

Cyril



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  Reply # 842011 23-Jun-2013 18:05
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sbiddle:
rayonline: Is there a performance drop if we dont use hdmi, we can stream high def with 100Mbps Ethernet. Or does the future entail more than that?


It really depends how you want to steam the content and what your requirements and budget are.

In many ways you're better off distributing all content via DVB-T in HD around the home as all TV's have DVB-T tuners in them these days, but this isn't a cheap option.



Thanks all.  To me I think HDMI is a bit of a limited use for myself. 

More and more media may be put thru the internet over time and re: DVB-T, we currently have a $50 USB device that receives Freeview HD fine and I see they are still available at these prices today.  I have also run it on a 6+ year old laptop fine, I bought the laptop used.  RG6 cable wasn't that expensive, we added this upstairs to the 2 or 3 bedrooms there with a splitter in the hallway cupboard, the 3rd bedroom could be added in the future should the need arise.  With a bit more work we could add another line for DVB-S, we chose not to at the time.  We didn't think we needed both DVB-T and DVB-S but we could reattach the line and convert it to DVB-S.  We currently have old Sky dish (haven't got HD LCDs yet the CRT still works) and we have DVB-T in the bedrooms for the computers (1 of the two has the tuner currently).

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  Reply # 842036 23-Jun-2013 19:14
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I'm not talking about a $50 device, I'm talking about a $5k plus setup to distribute content around the house via DVB-T.




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  Reply # 842057 23-Jun-2013 20:27
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What does the $5,000 include? One could install an aerial and all the cables to all the rooms and not cost $5,000 or are you including the initial TV and what not in the big tv room? The marginal cost after the tv room isn't that expensive to enable DVB-T. The other rooms might already have computers or substitute TVs for them, doubt you need 40 inches in the bedrooms however.

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  Reply # 843767 25-Jun-2013 08:06
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If you're talking about distribution via HDMI it's post-decode, which means it's BIG. [Edit to fix problem with mentioning DVB-T]

Distribution via DVB-T is expensive because it requires an expensive encoder to be close to the device providing the signal source.  However, post encode, it's a broadcast signal, so coax works.  Even better it would work with the existing tuners and remotes.

HDMI is, however, point to point.  You would need to have an HDMI cable from each source to a HDMI splitter/amplifier.  Then you would need another cable for every TV you're distributing to.  Then duplicate that whole thing for every device.  It's not really a home wiring thing.

My home setup has a HD-HomeRun, and I distribute everything as DVB-T over Gb ethernet.  I then decode it at the alternate TVs using XBMC on a PC.  I decided early on to have everything in the house be ethernet.  Makes the wiring much simpler, no coax pulls, no HDMI cable length worries, none of that.

However, that's not cheap either.






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  Reply # 843905 25-Jun-2013 11:52
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Cheers - more understanding now. Provided the aerial or sat dish are already there and so are the cables (cat6 or coaxial) and of course the television sets. Those converters that's what I think they are called for one distribution do cost money but it's not four digits right .... but yeah the thing is only watch one channel at a time. If it was there is Sky Multiroom.

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  Reply # 844122 25-Jun-2013 16:50
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I was curious about DVB-T distribution, so I googled it.  They're DVB-T modulators, and ones that take HDMI ports tend to be targeted at restaurants/hotels:

http://www.avaustralia.com.au/categories/Antenna-Systems/Modulators/ (1800 for 1 HDMI source, 2800 for 2)

Is that what you were talking about sbiddle?




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  Reply # 844127 25-Jun-2013 16:55
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If you're doing a gib off walls install, make sure you run some conduit inside the walls. That way when a new technology comes along that needs a new cable, you wont have to rip you walls apart again.




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