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Topic # 14690 16-Jul-2007 11:41
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This comes as no big suprise.. telecom are too interested in investing there cash in other countries (cant find the link but i remember reading that they have invested in a cable somewhere in asia) instead of our own! Not to mention the fiasco that is aapt in aus..


http://www.stuff.co.nz/4129603a28.html

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A revolution in the broadcasting industry that will mean people will be able to order up programmes over the Internet to view on their televisions may be delayed for more than a year, because of the Government's reforms of the telecommunications industry.

 

Sky TV and free-to-air consortium Freeview both expect to begin selling set-top boxes next year that can connect to the Internet as well as receive programmes broadcast by satellite and terrestrial transmitters. Sky is spending $50 million transferring its archives and studio systems from magnetic tape to computer disk in preparation for the service.

But Telecom Wholesale head Matt Crockett says he does not believe Telecom's broadband network will be able to support downloads of TV programmes to set-top boxes till late in 2009, because of other pressures on the telco, and doubts over who might fund the replacement of its copper network with fibre optic cable.

"Network connectivity is not going to be available next year. I think it is going to be very challenging for this industry to deliver full-blown IPTV as early as that."

Mr Crockett says the vision of providing multiple channels of high-definition TV programming to households over the Internet depends on shortening Telecom's copper local loop – reducing the 2km average length of copper phone lines by bringing fibre optic cable closer to the home.

"Between deploying what is the world's first broadband wholesale product of its kind, local loop unbundling and operational separation, it is just impossible for the industry to do more," he says.

Freeview general manager Steve Browning says Mr Crockett's assessment is a surprise, but underlines the importance of the free-to-air digital TV consortium.

"If the distribution of decent quality video over Internet protocol is that far away, it means the traditional broadcast ways of doing it – terrestrial and satellite – are even more important. I would have thought Telecom would be more aggressive than that, but I guess it is down to investment dollars and the regulatory environment."

Sky TV chief executive John Fellet has said that an example of the benefits of Internet-connected set-top boxes is that subscribers would be able to view any episode of Friends when they wanted, and that TV channels that stream content at scheduled times may become redundant in time.

Spokesman Tony O'Brien says Sky will begin supplying a set-top box that can connect to the Internet by June, but it would be some time after that before the feature could be used. "We hope to offer a service as soon as it is viable."

The set-top box will be able to download programmes and show them later, so need not require a very fast broadband connection. The "second-generation" MySky box will also include a larger hard-disk drive to store more programmes and will be capable of showing programmes in high- definition HDTV format.



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  Reply # 78268 16-Jul-2007 12:20
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I like that...
"Between deploying what is the world's first broadband wholesale product of its kind, local loop unbundling and operational separation, it is just impossible for the industry to do more..."

Perhaps if they hadn't fought so hard for so long, they wouldn't be left with such an overhead of work.  They're definitely "connecting people", just at their own pace.




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  Reply # 78279 16-Jul-2007 14:36
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if this was such an important business model for a company like SKY then I expect that it would be in their interest to put forward some $$$ towards building the infrastructure.  Perhaps they should be buying/building fiber connections to each DSLAM?

in any case I sill remember SKY promising that internet via their satellite service was six months out several years ago.  while they may talk up new technology, how often do they implement it when it is still "new"?




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  Reply # 78281 16-Jul-2007 14:43
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Regs: if this was such an important business model for a company like SKY then I expect that it would be in their interest to put forward some $$$ towards building the infrastructure.  Perhaps they should be buying/building fiber connections to each DSLAM?

I still reckon if the govt are so hot for their reforms, they should kick some $$$ towards it instead of expecting the ISPs to do all the investment.  After all, it'd be a infrastructure investment that'd benefit the whole country economically. 

Even better, they buy the wholesale arm and do nationwide fibre rollout - not so much worry about regulation and they'd quickly recoup the losses.  (sorry, got carried away there)




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  Reply # 78287 16-Jul-2007 15:02
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lugh:infrastructure investment that'd benefit the whole country economically


Somehow I just can't see how IPTV falls into this category, especially if its content is delivered by SKY, TVNZ or Mediaworks.

Remember also that the Govt has applied a bunch of money towards infrastructure for the KAREN network - research institutions, schools, tertiary institutions etc are the beneficiaries here.




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  Reply # 78289 16-Jul-2007 15:09
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Sky's initial plans are hardly IPTV - they just want to allow their STB to connect to the internet to download content for later playback in the same way their movies on demand service works now by downloading content via a satellite channel to your MySky.

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  Reply # 78297 16-Jul-2007 15:42
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sbiddle: Sky's initial plans are hardly IPTV - they just want to allow their STB to connect to the internet to download content for later playback in the same way their movies on demand service works now by downloading content via a satellite channel to your MySky.


But surely it is still a commercial operation that would benefit SKY.  Its really not going to benefit Telecom unless they can charge more $$ for the broadband service, or by charging SKY more to interconnect.  And how is it going to benefit the rest of New Zealand in general? I suspect that its not.

Would you be prepared to pay both SKY and Telecom an extra fee per month for the service?

From a network point of view this could place huge bandwidth demands on the internet connection, especially if we are talking about HD content.  I would hate to think what might happen to the local internet backbone if this was fed into the grid from a single location nationally..




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  Reply # 78305 16-Jul-2007 15:51
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Regs: From a network point of view this could place huge bandwidth demands on the internet connection, especially if we are talking about HD content.  I would hate to think what might happen to the local internet backbone if this was fed into the grid from a single location nationally..

This was where my comments were aiming more towards.  Everyone wants to introduce new products (Sky downloads, ADSL2+, etc.) but, if we still have a small hose irrigating the garden rather than a pipeline, the demand will reduce the flow to a trickle.  The whole infrastructure needs addressing.




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  Reply # 78321 16-Jul-2007 16:30
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lugh:
Regs: From a network point of view this could place huge bandwidth demands on the internet connection, especially if we are talking about HD content.  I would hate to think what might happen to the local internet backbone if this was fed into the grid from a single location nationally..

This was where my comments were aiming more towards.  Everyone wants to introduce new products (Sky downloads, ADSL2+, etc.) but, if we still have a small hose irrigating the garden rather than a pipeline, the demand will reduce the flow to a trickle.  The whole infrastructure needs addressing.


And what i'm trying to get across is that the costs for addressing the infrastructure to make these things work should be placed on the parties that are to benefit from these infrastructure upgrades.  Why should Telecom NZ bear the costs of a backbone network upgrade if all the benefits go to SKY TV and they can't recoup their costs?

Perhaps, in this case, the proper network architecture/commercial business model is for SKY to install fiber connections directly into the DSLAMs (and cable POPs etc).  The traffic could then be "zero-rated" to the end user and not counted in their monthly usage allowances.  SKY would then have to recoup the costs of this in their monthly subscriptions.  If a SKY subscriber was not connected to a supported DSLAM then they simply would not be able to obtain the service.  If a DSLAM was "SKY enabled" in this manner, that could mean that this sort of functionality could be achieved using the existing ADSL and ADSL2+ technologies.




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