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669 posts

Ultimate Geek


#268069 26-Feb-2020 14:09
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On the hunt for a wall bracket for a 65 inch TV.

 

First time I’m going to wall mount a TV.

 

VESA 300 x 300.

 

I would like it to be:

 

Close to the wall

 

Being able to tilt it, if required

 

A bonus, if it can be turned too (let’s say up to 45 degrees), so easy to watch from another position in the living room.

 

If I want it to be able to tilt (or turn), does this mean the bracket won’t be as close to the wall?

 

And do I have to be vary of cheap wall brackets?

 

Don’t really want to find the TV lying on the floor one day.


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  #2427529 26-Feb-2020 14:31
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IF you want to turn it you will need an Arm that will allow the TV to pull out from the wall, rather than a simple wall bracket,

 

Generally when fully pushed in an arm will not sit as close to the wall as a plain bracket,


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  #2427533 26-Feb-2020 14:34
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TVs are super light now, but you need to pay attention to the size recommendations if you want an articulated one since the screen will hit the wall. Any that are for a mid to large screen seem to go for stupid amounts if they move, since the leverage that far out is signifigant they have to make them tough.

 

Will only end up on the floor if you dont screw it into studs. You want to span 2 of them so that may limit how you can center the TV





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  #2427556 26-Feb-2020 15:15
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You can span two studs with a piece of plywood (or maybe MDF) - then choose where you want to centre the bracket - which need not be in the centre of the studs.  ie. attach the ply to the wall with screws in each corner into the studs, then attach the bracket to the ply at the point where you want to centre the TV. This gives you latitude to position the TV where you want it.

 

It doesn’t actually need to be a piece of ply. You could use two lengths of 50 x 18 mm pine, mounted horizontally into the studs and spaced to match your vertical VESA measurements. Then mount the bracket on the pine at the centre point you want.

 

 

 

 





Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.




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Ultimate Geek


  #2427558 26-Feb-2020 15:17
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eracode:

You can span two studs with a piece of plywood (or maybe MDF) - then choose where you want to centre the bracket - which need not be in the centre of the studs.  ie. attach the ply to the wall, then attach the bracket to the ply at the point where you want to centre the TV. This gives you latitude to position the TV where you want it.


It doesn’t actually need to be a piece of ply. You could use two lengths of 50 x 18 mm pine, mounted horizontally into the studs and spaced to match your vertical VESA measurements. Then mount the bracket on the pine at the centre point you want.


 


 



Thanks.
I believe our builder has already done this (we’re having a house built).

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  #2427560 26-Feb-2020 15:20
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If the house is being built you may be able to get the ply (or two correctly positioned pieces of horizontal framing) installed before the gib goes on (so long as you know where it is later). If it’s too late for that, the ply can be mounted on the outside of the gib.





Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.


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  #2427567 26-Feb-2020 15:36
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I have this one for my 65” in the lounge

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/MOABRA0143/Brateck-Lumi-LPA36-466-37-70-Full-Motion-Bracket-T

Downside is it doesn’t quite sit as close to the wall as a slim wall bracket but I had a slim wall bracket for the bedroom tv and that was a pain to get to the ports on the back without pulling the tv off the wall.

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  #2427568 26-Feb-2020 15:36
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richms:

 

TVs are super light now, but you need to pay attention to the size recommendations if you want an articulated one since the screen will hit the wall. Any that are for a mid to large screen seem to go for stupid amounts if they move, since the leverage that far out is signifigant they have to make them tough.

 



 

Yes - if you want an articulating bracket, consider spending a decent amount to get a good quality one. Cheap ones have not-so-well engineered and light pivots with too much tolerance in them. Then when you move the TV out and swivel it, the TV can end up not being horizontal. If there’s one thing that bugs me it’s looking at a wonky TV that’s not straight and plumb.





Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.


 
 
 
 


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  #2427694 26-Feb-2020 19:15
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Ive installed a few of these, good ,heavy duty , but expensive



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  #2427698 26-Feb-2020 19:21
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Brunzy:
Ive installed a few of these, good ,heavy duty , but expensive


What’s the model / price?

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  #2427699 26-Feb-2020 19:22
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Brunzy:
Ive installed a few of these, good ,heavy duty , but expensive

 

@Brunzy

 

?? Would be helpful to know the brand and model of the bracket.





Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.


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  #2427713 26-Feb-2020 19:44
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Sorry, if I’d remembered I would have posted, it may have been a Bratek but not sure. I will check through my invoices and see if I can find out.
The one in the picture I replaced a guys super duper OMP bracket that was sagging and bending ,and wouldn’t stay lined up, I can swing off the end of that fully extended and it doesn’t budge.



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  #2427756 26-Feb-2020 21:47
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The more I think about it, the more I think I should go with a flat wall bracket.
The TV won’t be installed very high up on the wall. Will be more or less eye height, if I sit on the coach.
If it’s flat, does it mean it’s even closer to the wall?
Any issues accessing cables on the back with a flat wall bracket?

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  #2427761 26-Feb-2020 22:06
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Yep, the shallower the bracket the more difficult it can be to access inputs etc on the back of the TV (side inputs are usually ok). I recently replaced our TV but used the same bracket, which is certainly not shallow, and even then it was a dog connecting everything - some of the cables are more crushed than I'd like, so I've ordered some right-angled HDMI adapters to solve this.

Seriously, I think in many cases obsessing over having a tv sit as flat as possible to the wall is just unnecessary. As an example, in our HT one would only notice distance from the wall if specifically looking for it. As such, while I know how impressed I was initially with the thinness of our new OLED, in the end its depth makes no meaningful difference when compared to the old plasma. Now, size of bezel on the other hand...!

Oh, an advantage of having a little bit of space behind means dongles like Chromecasts and Amazon Fire TVs can fit more easily. I've managed to even fit a router acting as a switch for these streaming devices!



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  #2427765 26-Feb-2020 22:14
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jonathan18: Yep, the shallower the bracket the more difficult it can be to access inputs etc on the back of the TV (side inputs are usually ok). I recently replaced our TV but used the same bracket, which is certainly not shallow, and even then it was a dog connecting everything - some of the cables are more crushed than I'd like, so I've ordered some right-angled HDMI adapters to solve this.

Seriously, I think in many cases obsessing over having a tv sit as flat as possible to the wall is just unnecessary. As an example, in our HT one would only notice distance from the wall if specifically looking for it. As such, while I know how impressed I was initially with the thinness of our new OLED, in the end its depth makes no meaningful difference when compared to the old plasma. Now, size of bezel on the other hand...!

Oh, an advantage of having a little bit of space behind means dongles like Chromecasts and Amazon Fire TVs can fit more easily. I've managed to even fit a router acting as a switch for these streaming devices!


Thanks.
The TV I’m getting has a 8cm depth anyway (so not exactly that close to the wall) so if I do slight it even a tiny bit, it will also eliminate any potential glaring issues.

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  #2427829 27-Feb-2020 05:01
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Brunzy: Sorry, if I’d remembered I would have posted, it may have been a Bratek but not sure. I will check through my invoices and see if I can find out.
The one in the picture I replaced a guys super duper OMP bracket that was sagging and bending ,and wouldn’t stay lined up, I can swing off the end of that fully extended and it doesn’t budge.

 

This is my point that cheap articulating brackets with sloppy bearings result in a wobbly TV that’s not straight and still horizontal when extended and swivelled. There are multiple bearings involved in these brackets and if they all have just a little ‘play’ in them, the result is wonkiness.





Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.


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