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4 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 17394 25-Nov-2007 07:22
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I am running Windows Vista using Intel Centrino Duo processors.  No where on the net can I find how to actually use a two processor system!  My issue is: How do I allocate programs through both processors?  My guess is that I put the big programs such as games and what not on one of the two drives.  I have a C: and a D: drive, both 120gb.  It seems like I would put games on C: for instance and spyware, malware, virus ware, and other things that run in the background onto the D: drive so the system allocates resources to each appropriately and doesn't bog itself down doing all of it at once.  Am I on the right track here?  Second, if that is the case how can I bring a program from the C: drive and move it to the D: drive?  I am decent with getting around on a PC but this dual processo deal has me leary so if anyone has some info I would be MUCH appreciative!


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 96793 25-Nov-2007 10:38
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bwc605: It seems like I would put games on C: for instance and spyware, malware, virus ware, and other things that run in the background onto the D: drive so the system allocates resources to each appropriately and doesn't bog itself down doing all of it at once.  Am I on the right track here?

No sorry, that won't make any difference at all Frown

CPU resources are not allocated on the basis of which drive they were loaded from, but rather on the basis of which threads have been assigned to which CPU at the time the software was coded.

Applications such as Photoshop are designed to take advantage of Dual-Core CPUs, as are some games and (I think) some parts of Vista.  However, if you are running software which is not designed for Dual-Core, no amount of shuffling between Disk Drives is going to make any difference at all.



4 posts

Wannabe Geek


Reply # 96797 25-Nov-2007 10:52
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First, thanks for your response!  That makes sense.  Now I talked to a friend of mine who suggested that the D: drive might be disabled and needs to be configured to run applications.  He said he only thought that because both drives are a 120gb capaciy and it seemed like a waste of space to have a 120gb hard drive that can't store or run applications.  But I think what you're saying is that it will automatically allocate the files to the D: drive on a case by case scenario.  For instance, if a game or photo shop or whatever is pre-configured for dual core processing then loading it onto my main (C:) drive it will automatically allocate what it needs on the D: drive in order to run the dual processor functions.  Am I starting to get the drift here?  Is what you are saying is load everything onto my 120gb hard drive, eat up program space, and pay extra money for a secondary processor that works if, and only if, the program sets itself up per it's own programming?  And if the games I am running use up 60gb of space and don't autoconfigure itself to two processors, then basically I have a second 120gb processor doing absolutely nothing until I get the right kind of programs for it?  I'm not seeing a large value in the extra money I spent to upgrade to a dual processor if that is the case!   :-)

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 96802 25-Nov-2007 11:14
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bwc605: Now I talked to a friend of mine who suggested that the D: drive might be disabled and needs to be configured to run applications.  He said he only thought that because both drives are a 120gb capaciy and it seemed like a waste of space to have a 120gb hard drive that can't store or run applications.  But I think what you're saying is that it will automatically allocate the files to the D: drive on a case by case scenario.  For instance, if a game or photo shop or whatever is pre-configured for dual core processing then loading it onto my main (C:) drive it will automatically allocate what it needs on the D: drive in order to run the dual processor functions.  Am I starting to get the drift here?

No, let me explain it a little more...

The issue of C: or D: drive has NOTHING to do with Dual-Core CPUs.  Your D: drive can run applications equally as well as the C: drive, but in order to use it, you need to specify the D: drive at the time of installation.

My laptop also has C: and D: drives of equal capacity.  I always install applications on the C: drive (under Program Files), but keep all my photographs, Video Clips and MP3 tracks on my D: drive.  But there is no reason why I couldn't install applications on the D: drive if I wanted to.  I just think it's tidier to have them all on C: drive under Program Files.

bwc605: ...basically I have a second 120gb processor doing absolutely nothing until I get the right kind of programs for it?  I'm not seeing a large value in the extra money I spent to upgrade to a dual processor if that is the case!   :-)

You're getting confused between the Second Core of your CPU and the Second 120GB Partition D: of your Hard Disk when in fact they have absolutely nothing to do with each other.  I hope you can see that now Embarassed

Next time you buy a game, have a look at the specs to see if it is coded to take advantage of a Dual-Core CPU.  If not, then no amount of tinkering will make it do so.



4 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 96832 25-Nov-2007 14:20
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Ok, it is actually making some sense now.  My last question and I am in your debt!  Does the D: drive need to be enabled, configured, or any other technical term in order to be usable?  The only reason I ask is because I tried downloading from a purchased disk a game and I got a message to the effect that it was an invalid drive or location that I was trying to download to.  So I tried copying some files from the C: drive Program Files to the D: drive through explorer, erased them off the C: drive, and then tried to run the application.  It told me again that I was trying to run from an invalid location, like it just didn't see it on the drive, yet it was still listed under the control panel Programs list.  I moved the enire application, main folder and all, didn't move any individual pieces or anything.  Is it possible that I'm experiencing some sort of drive failure or something?  I know I'm reaching here but just when I started catching up to computers they go and change everything again.  Thanks again for your help thus far, it has been an enlightening experience!

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Master Geek


  Reply # 96913 26-Nov-2007 09:24

*deep sigh*

if you are a gamer I suggest doing the following


1- first make sure both drives are visible and operating - sounds like they are.

2 - partition the c:drive to about 25 gb and create say an E:drive with the balance.

3 - install your OS to the C: Drive (25gb) partition - so now you have a nice small area to run your main OS from which will take a lot less time to defrag in the future.

4 - depending on your RAM size - change the default page file size, but also shift it to the D;Drive(the physically different drive) so that it using a different BUS when it does use virtual memory.

5 - install any games you have (when you are doing the install process to E:drive)

Optionally set up equal size partitions on E and D drives - and impliment RAID 0 - with a sizeable balance of D: for backup.


load general apps like PS, interweb security, benchmarking, tuning tools to C: - the way you normally would.

load keepers like games and patches to E:

keep stored data that you access rearly on the D:

you will end up with a small drive C: that will be quicker to reformat/defrag - not lose games folders as often(often during an uninstall and reinstall client specific folders can be retained like profile and screen shots)

RAID 0 is a little bit quicker for loading, but then a well maintained drive is often comparable.

The page file /virtual memory will speed up actual play.

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