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freitasm

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#260106 11-Nov-2019 08:16
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Just received:

 

 

Spark has revealed its latest wireless broadband offering – Unplan Metro – which offers selected Auckland customers the largest ever data allowance available on wireless broadband in New Zealand to date. 

 

Some wireless broadband customers in the Auckland region can now access a massive 600GB of data per month on the new Unplan Metro wireless broadband plan. Available today, Unplan Metro offers customers tiered pricing options based on the data they consume, starting at just $65 for a base data usage of 0-60GB, $75 for 60 – 120GB of data and capped at $85 for 120GB – 600GB of data.  

 

This new plan will make wireless broadband a great option for customers who want a new generation broadband option but still need plentiful supplies of data. Wireless broadband runs over Spark’s 4G mobile network.  Once customers receive their modems, they simply have to plug it in and they are ready to go. 

 

Mark Beder, Technology Director at Spark New Zealand says, “While we originally developed wireless broadband as a great option for low to medium data customers, over the last few years we have been extensively upgrading our existing network, including adding new mobile sites to meet our wireless broadband customers’ capacity requirements. 

 

“We’re really pleased to be in a position to offer a 600GB plan to eligible customers in Auckland. This means that those who were previously considered high users due to their love of streaming may now be able to move to wireless broadband. 

 

“Customers with higher capped plans tend to use their data for more data intensive activities such as streaming, that need to be supported by greater data capacity. The stronger the mobile signal is on a property, the better Spark can support that kind of usage, so we’re initially making this an option for customers in the Auckland region only, whose homes and businesses have great coverage, where we’re confident we can offer a great experience.” 

 

Existing eligible Spark Wireless Broadband customers based in the coverage area will be upgraded to ‘Unplan Metro’ with their current data caps automatically increased to 600GB at no extra cost. 

 

Launching Unplan Metro is another step in Spark’s ‘Upgrade New Zealand’ plan, which aims to move customers onto newer broadband technologies like fibre and wireless broadband, by 2020. 

 





 

 

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snnet
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  #2351734 11-Nov-2019 17:25
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I was considering moving to this but I wanted to check first -- what kind of speeds could I expect if my mobile phone gets about 20Mbit down / 2.5Mbit up at home? Would it likely be similar to this with a 4G modem?

 

edit: More testing leads to different results, I guess that's normal for cell data  - 40Mbit down / 20 Mbit up on the last one

 

 


Linux
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  #2351784 11-Nov-2019 17:37
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This is a fantastic move by SparkNZ

 
 
 
 


Linux
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  #2351785 11-Nov-2019 17:37
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snnet:

I was considering moving to this but I wanted to check first -- what kind of speeds could I expect if my mobile phone gets about 20Mbit down / 2.5Mbit up at home? Would it likely be similar to this with a 4G modem?


edit: More testing leads to different results, I guess that's normal for cell data  - 40Mbit down / 20 Mbit up on the last one


 



@snnet yes speeds should be on par or better

snnet
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  #2351789 11-Nov-2019 17:45
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Thanks @Linux


hio77
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  #2351876 11-Nov-2019 20:47
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snnet:

 

I was considering moving to this but I wanted to check first -- what kind of speeds could I expect if my mobile phone gets about 20Mbit down / 2.5Mbit up at home? Would it likely be similar to this with a 4G modem?

 

edit: More testing leads to different results, I guess that's normal for cell data  - 40Mbit down / 20 Mbit up on the last one

 

 

 

 

as already noted, the mobile is a good initall viewpoint, but it's always worth remembering the modems a perfectly configured for the network and have a tad more gain than a mobile device so preform better :)

 

 

 

Glad to see the PR made it here, i was going to share it once i awoke from my slumber :)





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


wratterus
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  #2352344 12-Nov-2019 16:08
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Very cool, fixed wireless is really becoming a legit alternative to copper with plans like this.

 

Does anyone know (or is allowed to share) what makes an area suitable for this plan? Is it only on towers with CA or something? I assume the areas it's available in will be extended in due course?


hio77
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  #2352347 12-Nov-2019 16:11
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wratterus:

 

Very cool, fixed wireless is really becoming a legit alternative to copper with plans like this.

 

Does anyone know (or is allowed to share) what makes an area suitable for this plan? Is it only on towers with CA or something? I assume the areas it's available in will be extended in due course?

 

 

It's the Metro/ Dense Urban areas.

 

 

 

Just auckland at this stage.

 

Essentially it's Highband areas, It's tough to say where because there are levels of capacity, edge coverage etc.. far better to do a quick check on the spark website :) (long winded way of saying no, it can't be shared because it wouldnt really be relevant if a ton of customers jump on and capacity is reached)

 

 

 

Even muriwai Has some areas with Metro available :)

 

if you previously had Rural 99% likely this wont be available.





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


 
 
 
 


dryburn
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  #2352362 12-Nov-2019 16:22
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Yeah Riverhead and Kuemu still count as rural, surprised thath Muriwai has the metro option


hio77
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  #2352402 12-Nov-2019 18:13
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dryburn:

 

Yeah Riverhead and Kuemu still count as rural, surprised thath Muriwai has the metro option

 

 

it has the capacity for it is all. Kumeu is also quite a high capacity site, but it's also Very heavily loaded historically being that it covers a good portion of taupaki etc.

 

i suspect we might see coverage change (stopsells have already been heavily lifted along there with the new site)

 

 

 

in saying that, there are some options in that area on my list. Particularly in Riverhead it looks real good.





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


ripdog
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  #2352417 12-Nov-2019 19:16
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Where is all this spare cell capacity coming from? I think it's time the ComCom started doing testing of mobile network speeds to give consumers independent information on how oversold the network is...

 

 

 

600GB is a hell of a lot of cell data. Not sure what the business case is either - in metro Auckland, surely anyone who wanted to use anywhere near 600GB would rather use a lower latency, higher capacity, uncapped fibre connection...


hio77
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  #2352419 12-Nov-2019 19:23
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@ripdog spark installed a ton of capacity prior to RWC.

Sparks way of managing capacity is to look at cell capacity and put things into stopsell. Those who abuse the offering are also migrated odd the mobile network.

Personally I very regularly get over 200mbit on spark 4g. That's why I choose to have my mobile with them. Nothing to do with the company I work for tbh.

All that is leveraged from the fact that Spark have so many fixed wireless customers.
There is no need for an investigation here :) glass building and all but I'd say spark manage it better than some other fixed wireless options out there... Again. Personal opinion.




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


wratterus
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  #2352421 12-Nov-2019 19:39
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Spark manage it a hell of a lot better than Vodafone from what I see. Around this area at least.

 

Do Vodafone (and their resellers) have some issue where they are forced to sell a RBI connection if asked though? You've also got all the NZMCA members with their 160GB 'RBI' plans flat out around the country at holiday hot spots which wouldn't help the situation I don't imagine.  


DjShadow
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  #2352503 12-Nov-2019 20:41
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I'm a little puzzled by this, wouldn't it be better for those high users to use Fibre or is Spark just in a position of having so much spare capacity after the RWC they may as well do an offer of a huge data cap?


richms
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  #2352519 12-Nov-2019 20:52
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ripdog:

 

Where is all this spare cell capacity coming from? I think it's time the ComCom started doing testing of mobile network speeds to give consumers independent information on how oversold the network is...

 

 

 

600GB is a hell of a lot of cell data. Not sure what the business case is either - in metro Auckland, surely anyone who wanted to use anywhere near 600GB would rather use a lower latency, higher capacity, uncapped fibre connection...

 

 

Unless they cant get it because of obstructive landlords which will not allow the installation. Plenty of people I know in that boat because of absentee landlords and useless property management companies.





Richard rich.ms

hio77
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  #2352531 12-Nov-2019 21:15
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DjShadow:

 

I'm a little puzzled by this, wouldn't it be better for those high users to use Fibre or is Spark just in a position of having so much spare capacity after the RWC they may as well do an offer of a huge data cap?

 

 

We have capacity. RWC was more an event that drove the need to pull upgrades forward rather than only being short term upgrades.

 

 

 

who knew you could do 600GB over LTE rather than 500GB over 5G? ;)

 

the argument absolutely could be made that fibre is better, but if you take your average customer, remove the LFC costs. that adds a fair bit of capital to put into your own network and that's no secret. Vodafone have already made it very clear their plans to get more of their customer base on their wireless service.

 

 

 

2D recently have really ramped up their installs and have been doing a ton of high band installations in urban areas. it would not surprise me if they are looking out for much the same opportunity?

 

 

 

 

 

Fibre always has a place, but offering a competitive Fixed wireless service gives consumers options.

 

There are pros and cons to both. I suspect fibre may become more easier as the number of intact connections increases. but until then, things like long fibre installs, Difficult consent etc will always drive towards Wireless.

 

 

 

There is a few other bonus's such as not being Locked to a fixed location.

 

Need to move your modem around the house, Move it. you dont have an expensive ONT relocation fee.

 

 

 

There are a few other benefits here, I'll post details on those when i can :)





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


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