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# 180498 11-Sep-2015 09:57
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Got a small Weetbix cereal from Enable Network saying that our street is fibre ready!

As excited as I was, went and checked Vodafone and got major disappointment. Check 2Degrees, stated that we're good...

We're currently with Vodafone (cable, TV and mobiles)... and ideally would like to stay on same provider but has Vodafone not updated their database for UFB availability in my neighbourhood?

Also, our property is in the back section - so is there any restriction on how far the length of driveway can be before it reaches the house? There's existing coaxial connection for the cable under the length of driveway.




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  # 1385507 11-Sep-2015 10:57
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I'm not sure if Vodafone will support UFB in their own cable areas.



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  # 1385508 11-Sep-2015 10:58
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Sometimes it can take a while for your ISP/RSP to update their coverage maps after an LFC updates it - you could try contacting Voda and requesting a manual check?

A standard connection includes a installation up to a maximum distance from the road - this varies by both LFC and customer type, but generally speaking you will be able to get free installation in the majority of situations - my house is 50 metres from the road and I got free connection from Enable.

Please note that your existing coaxial cable (and the duct it is sitting in) will not be able to be used, as the owner of that duct (most likely Vodafone if it's coax) will not allow Enable to use it. Neither will Chorus allow them to use any Chorus duct. A new Enable duct will have to be laid on your property. This can be done in a variety of methods, including ruggedised cable above ground (attached to base of fence etc)





The views expressed by me are not necessarily those of my employer Chorus NZ Ltd


 
 
 
 


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  # 1385558 11-Sep-2015 11:54
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Pretty sure Mr Biddle is correct and Vodafone won't let people change from cable to fibre. You'll have to change provider or stick with what you have.

Personally, I went to BigPipe and 200Mbit fibre. So much nicer than cable, especially at the moment, though that should change soon.





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  # 1385644 11-Sep-2015 13:21
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Yep Vodafone outright refuse to offer UFB service in Cable areas, so if you want superior internet you will need to change providers.

Vodafone staff will try and persuade you that cable is as good as Fiber when you raise the issue, but they are simply wrong.






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  # 1385649 11-Sep-2015 13:28
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If vodafone dont want to provide the better service than just leave them. No point staying with them if they dont offer the product you want.

Perhaps once enough people leave because of cables low upload speeds they will wake up?




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  # 1385659 11-Sep-2015 13:42
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Easy said than done, plus I'm content being with Vodafone - for all the services.

I did receive a callback from Vodafone retention team - and yes - confirming what Steve said.

I guess I'll be looking forward to the completion of cable network upgrade then.




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  # 1385664 11-Sep-2015 13:48
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Is there some documentation publicly available that shows how much Vodafone have to pay the supplier for each connection? Would be interested to know how much less profitable a UFB connection would be over Cable but guessing that information will never be released.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1385709 11-Sep-2015 14:42
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r2b2: Is there some documentation publicly available that shows how much Vodafone have to pay the supplier for each connection? Would be interested to know how much less profitable a UFB connection would be over Cable but guessing that information will never be released.


http://www.crownfibre.govt.nz/crown-partners/agreements-with-ufb-partners/

Start here. All the documentation should be public since we paid for that UFB network.

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  # 1385737 11-Sep-2015 15:42
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r2b2: Is there some documentation publicly available that shows how much Vodafone have to pay the supplier for each connection? Would be interested to know how much less profitable a UFB connection would be over Cable but guessing that information will never be released.


UFB (and copper UBA) wholesale pricing is all public knowledge. As for how much more profitable it is? That's really going to depend on what internal cost Vodafone place on a cable connection. While in $ terms it's $0 because they don't have to pay a 3rd party, a connection still carries a real world cost.


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  # 1385785 11-Sep-2015 16:04
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sbiddle:
r2b2: Is there some documentation publicly available that shows how much Vodafone have to pay the supplier for each connection? Would be interested to know how much less profitable a UFB connection would be over Cable but guessing that information will never be released.


UFB (and copper UBA) wholesale pricing is all public knowledge. As for how much more profitable it is? That's really going to depend on what internal cost Vodafone place on a cable connection. While in $ terms it's $0 because they don't have to pay a 3rd party, a connection still carries a real world cost


I guess part of the reason might be so that people don't skip off cable and make cable a ghost town (and therefore negate the investment that has been made in the network). I'm wondering if they were to offer the same plans but at, say, $20 more for UFB whether that would solve that issue.

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  # 1386477 13-Sep-2015 08:17
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No UFB scheduled for my area until mid 2016 so all I can do is look and "lust"!

By then the comparison between cable and UFB will be clearer. For me the main issue with cable is upload speeds. With all this cloud computing 10Mbs is just too slow for sending stuff up to be archived.

The other factor which doesn't seem to be get significant attention is, while the last mile might be faster with UFB, wouldn't different ISP's have different capacity internationally depending on how much they choose to buy from Southern Cross? No point having 200Mbs to the ISP's pop, when their international links are overloaded or under-provisioned.




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  # 1387388 14-Sep-2015 18:53
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lchiu7:

The other factor which doesn't seem to be get significant attention is, while the last mile might be faster with UFB, wouldn't different ISP's have different capacity internationally depending on how much they choose to buy from Southern Cross? No point having 200Mbs to the ISP's pop, when their international links are overloaded or under-provisioned.


Not enough international bandwidth is an issue with any type of broadband, not just fibre. But the good thing with UFB is that there're 4 ports on the ONT so in theory you could potentially sign up with 4 ISPs all at once and compare and contrast between them.

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  # 1387407 14-Sep-2015 18:59
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lchiu7:
The other factor which doesn't seem to be get significant attention is, while the last mile might be faster with UFB, wouldn't different ISP's have different capacity internationally depending on how much they choose to buy from Southern Cross? No point having 200Mbs to the ISP's pop, when their international links are overloaded or under-provisioned.


Things dont always have to go international. CDNs are all local. Yeah I wont get 200 megs clearing out my seedbox in luxemborgh but I will still get many 4k netflixes thru a fiber connection which I cant on my shoddy VDSL on corroded neglected copper.




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  # 1387433 14-Sep-2015 19:52
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richms:
lchiu7:
The other factor which doesn't seem to be get significant attention is, while the last mile might be faster with UFB, wouldn't different ISP's have different capacity internationally depending on how much they choose to buy from Southern Cross? No point having 200Mbs to the ISP's pop, when their international links are overloaded or under-provisioned.


Things dont always have to go international. CDNs are all local. Yeah I wont get 200 megs clearing out my seedbox in luxemborgh but I will still get many 4k netflixes thru a fiber connection which I cant on my shoddy VDSL on corroded neglected copper.


Is content cached or on CDN's when you are using proxy services to access streaming sites in the US?

For example you are watching some TV show on Netflix (US) and that same show happens to be available on Netflix (NZ). I would have thought a local CDN would not help at all in this instance but since I don't know for certain, I am asking the question.

Then international speed is a factor.




Staying in Wellington. Check out my AirBnB in the Wellington CBD.  https://www.airbnb.co.nz/rooms/32019730  Mention GZ to get a 10% discount

 

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System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen, Denon AVRS730H 7.2 Channel Dolby Atmos/DTS-X AV Receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast, Odroid C2 running Kodi and Plex

 

 


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  # 1387444 14-Sep-2015 20:03
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The worst part is there are no practical reasons why Vodafone can't offer upload better speeds, as the technology allows it. 




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