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Topic # 206109 9-Dec-2016 19:55
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My friend's ADSL connection mysteriously stopped working a few days ago and she has been told that 'someone' requested for her connection to be terminated. My friend most certainly did not request a disconnection, and has been told that it will take 3 - 5 working days to get her reconnected. I have two questions;

 

Firstly, do Vodafone not have procedures in place to get written confirmation of a request to disconnect, and cross-check any disconnections to ensure that the correct port is indeed disconnected? Or could the stuff up possibly sit with Chorus?

 

Secondly, why does it take 3 - 5 working days to reinstate a connection that up to this point was working perfectly fine? Surely if the disconnection occurred very recently then she would still be connected to a port at the roadside cabinet? 

 

Overall this is an incredibly frustrating experience. 


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  Reply # 1685512 9-Dec-2016 20:09
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Lets hope she does not become a port waiter and that there enough ports to connect her back up.


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  Reply # 1685522 9-Dec-2016 21:06
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No written confirmation is not required and a reconnect order needs to be passed to Chorus,

If wrong port was disconnected then it's a 3rd party fault

More questions than answers really oh and as above Port waiter is the last list they want to be on

Linux


 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 1685526 9-Dec-2016 21:13
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Linux:

 

No written confirmation is not required and a reconnect order needs to be passed to Chorus,

 

So what would stop someone from maliciously requesting a disconnection of someone else's DSL?


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  Reply # 1685528 9-Dec-2016 21:19
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alasta:

 

Linux:

 

No written confirmation is not required and a reconnect order needs to be passed to Chorus,

 

So what would stop someone from maliciously requesting a disconnection of someone else's DSL?

 

 

Would you want to write a letter to cancel a credit card or close a bank account number?

 

Linux


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  Reply # 1685531 9-Dec-2016 21:31
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alasta:

 

My friend's ADSL connection mysteriously stopped working a few days ago and she has been told that 'someone' requested for her connection to be terminated. My friend most certainly did not request a disconnection, and has been told that it will take 3 - 5 working days to get her reconnected. I have two questions;

 

Firstly, do Vodafone not have procedures in place to get written confirmation of a request to disconnect, and cross-check any disconnections to ensure that the correct port is indeed disconnected? Or could the stuff up possibly sit with Chorus?

 

Secondly, why does it take 3 - 5 working days to reinstate a connection that up to this point was working perfectly fine? Surely if the disconnection occurred very recently then she would still be connected to a port at the roadside cabinet? 

 

Overall this is an incredibly frustrating experience. 

 

 

Get all authorized contacts on the account to make a Privacy Act request for the audio recording including authorization of the disconnect.  Easy way (if wrongdoing has occurred) to get Vodafone in a jam.

 

Although I'm lead to wonder, was this a total disconnect or a slam (unauthorized churn to another provider).  Thought the process of slamming had ceased, but I'd imagine it's not unheard of for a connection to be slammed by mistake.




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  Reply # 1685533 9-Dec-2016 21:43
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Linux:

 

alasta:

 

Linux:

 

No written confirmation is not required and a reconnect order needs to be passed to Chorus,

 

So what would stop someone from maliciously requesting a disconnection of someone else's DSL?

 

 

Would you want to write a letter to cancel a credit card or close a bank account number?

 

 

If I rang up to cancel a bank account or credit card then I would be absolutely shocked if I weren't asked for some sort of proof that I am authorised to do so. 


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  Reply # 1685543 9-Dec-2016 22:20
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What most likely happen is this.

 

Person A signs up for broadband at your friend's address with company X (ie not Vodafone).

 

Company X notes there's an existing connection at the address.

 

Company X requests Chorus disconnect the line.

 

Chorus asks Vodafone whether they want to keep the line. Vodafone is not informed who company X is or who person A is.

 

Vodafone can say yes or no. If Vodafone doesn't reply within 2 days Chorus would assume it's a no and disconnect it.

 

This process is necessary because a surprising number of people don't disconnect their broadband when they move out of the house and making the new person hard to get their own broadband.

 

 

 

As to your second question, yes it's likely the line is still intact. If your ISP call Chorus provisioning immediately after they place the order, and ask nicely, they should be able to get it reconnected in minutes. If they just use the normal process it will take 3-5 days.


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