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simon14

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#50988 26-Nov-2009 15:14
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Using my Motorola K3, i connected it up to my laptop and shared the internet connection with my PS3.

i then went online and played GTA4.

There was no noticable lag and coms worked fine.

Quite impressed with the latency levels....

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johnr
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  #276572 26-Nov-2009 15:49
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and that phone does not even support HSUPA which will give lower latency again

John

johnr
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#276590 26-Nov-2009 16:21
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c71931f:
johnr: and that phone does not even support HSUPA which will give lower latency again

John


Lol


Did I miss something

 
 
 
 


simon14

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  #276599 26-Nov-2009 16:56
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Really?

How much lower latency are we talking here?

My phone does have "3g+"

If Vodafone offered a 15GB data plan, i could finally ditch my homeline and ADSL internet.

johnr
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  #276606 26-Nov-2009 17:35
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simon14: Really?

How much lower latency are we talking here?

My phone does have "3g+"

If Vodafone offered a 15GB data plan, i could finally ditch my homeline and ADSL internet.


Your handset supports HSDPA only not HSUPA

I get average 60 - 70ms to NZ servers

John

Ragnor
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  #276709 27-Nov-2009 00:01
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This is the part where you think hey the government spending billions of dollars rolling our Fibre to the home in a country with low population density like Australia or NZ is not the smartest idea in the world given the advanced in mobile broadband.

Fibre to the node and next gen mobile broadbad can easily replace or substitute landlines, ADSL and soon VDSL and onwards.

You can't take your VDSL internet connection with you to the beach or the pub can you?

Prices for data would need to come down a lot of course and mobile operators would have to let go of charging for calling... just give me data (and don't block my voip fool)



simon14

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  #276712 27-Nov-2009 00:07
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I have actually thought the same.

Wouldn't it be better spending 1.5 billion + on a really good nationwide wireless broadband network instead?

sbiddle
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  #276738 27-Nov-2009 07:31
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Ragnor: This is the part where you think hey the government spending billions of dollars rolling our Fibre to the home in a country with low population density like Australia or NZ is not the smartest idea in the world given the advanced in mobile broadband.

Fibre to the node and next gen mobile broadbad can easily replace or substitute landlines, ADSL and soon VDSL and onwards.

You can't take your VDSL internet connection with you to the beach or the pub can you?

Prices for data would need to come down a lot of course and mobile operators would have to let go of charging for calling... just give me data (and don't block my voip fool)




Fibre to the Node won't be replacing ADSL or VDSL anytime soon. From the node you still need to get to the premises.

Fibre to the home will simply never happen on a large scale in NZ in the forseeable future, copper is still a very good mechanism for delivery to households.

Any radio based network is always going to have limited capacity compared to fixed line solutions, while it may be a viable solution for many people it will simply never replace fixed line solutions in the short to medium term and will never be able to deliver the speeds and sustained throughputs that copper can deliver. Right now FTTN networks can deliver shared VDSL to hundreds of households with 10GbE backhaul and top speeds of 100Mbps which is vastly superior to the capacity and backhaul of mobile networks.

 
 
 
 


sansom
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  #277278 28-Nov-2009 18:13
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I agree that fixed line will still be needed for the applications that demand the ultimate speed and latency performance. 


However, LTE is just around the corner (next 5 years) and the performance of HSPA+ in the meantime means wireless access will support the vast majority users and what they use broadband for from now and for many years to come.


I believe the busiest Fibre nodes will be nodeBs in the very near future and they will remain that way. The wait won't be long, just today my 1yo technology 7.2Mbps HSPA Dell Mini seems to be going ok off the local Balmoral cell: http://twitpic.com/r9mlr


Hamish
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sbiddle
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  #277311 28-Nov-2009 21:53
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sansom: I agree that fixed line will still be needed for the applications that demand the ultimate speed and latency performance. 


However, LTE is just around the corner (next 5 years) and the performance of HSPA+ in the meantime means wireless access will support the vast majority users and what they use broadband for from now and for many years to come.


I believe the busiest Fibre nodes will be nodeBs in the very near future and they will remain that way. The wait won't be long, just today my 1yo technology 7.2Mbps HSPA Dell Mini seems to be going ok off the local Balmoral cell: http://twitpic.com/r9mlr


Hamish
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LTE won't solve the problem of network capacity. It will enhance it but simply won't deliver anywhere near the capacity of a fixed network.

In the same says WiFi will never be a replacement for ethernet, mobile broadband will never be a replacement for fixed broadband.


ajw

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  #277396 29-Nov-2009 08:38
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sansom: I agree that fixed line will still be needed for the applications that demand the ultimate speed and latency performance. 


However, LTE is just around the corner (next 5 years) and the performance of HSPA+ in the meantime means wireless access will support the vast majority users and what they use broadband for from now and for many years to come.


I believe the busiest Fibre nodes will be nodeBs in the very near future and they will remain that way. The wait won't be long, just today my 1yo technology 7.2Mbps HSPA Dell Mini seems to be going ok off the local Balmoral cell: http://twitpic.com/r9mlr


Hamish
Vodafone NZ



Earlier than this. Telenor in Sweden is in the process of converting it's network to Long Term Evolution and Verizon Wireless in the States has signed a contract to convert it's data network to LTE. Metro PCS in the states is soon to covert it's data network to LTE.

sansom
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  #277416 29-Nov-2009 10:22
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So Steve, "mobile broadband will never be a replacement for fixed broadband."  Ha!  I remember exactly the same being said about mobile voice a few years back! Let's recheck that claim in 5 years (yes I realise I'm selectively quoting you, apologies :-))

And yes, ajw, we're aware of the Verizon work given there was a joint trial between Verizon, Vodafone and China Mobile earlier this year (http://ow.ly/GxqL ).  Vodafone has a 40% shareholding in Verizon.  We've also been conducting further testing and development of LTE in Germany.  I was talking about NZ where widespread commercial deployment and uptake of LTE will probably be 5 years away.  Remember that the definition of how voice services would be implemented on LTE has only just been agreed - there's a lot of development still to be completed.

Hamish
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simon14

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  #277427 29-Nov-2009 11:32
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I predict we will simply end up using the most convenient method of connecting to the internet - and that my friend, will likely be wireless.

Barriers we face with wireless today will be a thing of the past in the future - i don't think anyone can sit here and say "wireless will never replace fixed".

johnr
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  #277432 29-Nov-2009 11:41
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A big factor is the transmission to the Node B

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