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Topic # 198270 2-Jul-2016 19:12
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Any know why the RBI plans for spark/VF (and resellers) are at 80gb? Most of the local RBI towers look to be fibre connected.

 

Is it some sort of staggered cap increase? Surely the air gap/wireless spectrum cannot be that expensive to operate for RBI vs Mobile?

 

 


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  Reply # 1584785 2-Jul-2016 19:21
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There's only a limited amount of data (usually measured in Mbps) that can pass through a cellular sector.

For RBI 4G with the current technology, I believe it's about 120Mbps which works out to be approx 55 gigabytes per hour.

Datacaps are a way of managing this limited resource and ensuring everyone gets a fair shot.

From our perspective, as an RBI reseller, it appears 80GB might be a bit too generous as we're already seeing sectors that are overloaded. This unfortunately means in some cases we are now turning away prospective customers.

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  Reply # 1584786 2-Jul-2016 19:22
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i would recommend looking at resellers. http://www.ultimatebroadband.co.nz/rbi-wireless.html

 

Ultimate broadband is the first one that comes to mind with reasonable rates.

 

 

 

 

 

Simply put, even if the tower is fibre connected, the real contention point is still there.. what can actually be pumpped through the air.





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  Reply # 1584787 2-Jul-2016 19:23
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Fibre connected? They are mobile connected. That fibre runs the backhaul is not relevant if the last mile is over mobile.


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  Reply # 1584790 2-Jul-2016 19:25
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myfullflavour: There's only a limited amount of data (usually measured in Mbps) that can pass through a cellular sector.

For RBI 4G with the current technology, I believe it's about 120Mbps which works out to be approx 55 gigabytes per hour.

Datacaps are a way of managing this limited resource and ensuring everyone gets a fair shot.

From our perspective, as an RBI reseller, it appears 80GB might be a bit too generous as we're already seeing sectors that are overloaded. This unfortunately means in some cases we are now turning away prospective customers.

 

Great points. Do we want 4 people who download the internet each day, or everyone within range having a satisfied experience?


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  Reply # 1584847 2-Jul-2016 20:37
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thabass:

 

 

 

Any know why the RBI plans for spark/VF (and resellers) are at 80gb? Most of the local RBI towers look to be fibre connected.

 

Is it some sort of staggered cap increase? Surely the air gap/wireless spectrum cannot be that expensive to operate for RBI vs Mobile?

 

 

 

 

Wireless is a finite resource. The fact they're fibre connected means very little - the total capacity of the PHY wireless layer is a lot less.

 

When you look at mobile networks they're simply not capable of supporting high speed and high plan caps. The goal over the past couple of years of companies such as Nokia Networks has been to design and build networks capable of supporting 1GB per user per day - there are mobile sites in NZ that already exceed this.

 

When devices catch up with the generous spectrum offerings that NZ networks own and allow bonding of 3-4 carriers of the 700/1800/2300/2600/3500 spectrum owned in NZ then higher caps will be possible.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1584910 2-Jul-2016 23:03
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Check out NetSpeed, totally recommended and as a bonus not even tied to a specific tower, plug it in your vehicles ciggy plug (runs at 12v) and take your internet to town with you !



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Reply # 1585264 3-Jul-2016 20:28
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Thanks for response All. Very informative.

 

I'm already with ultimatebroadband and they do offer a 500gb (3g only) plan (250gb off peak), which is very attractive but the 5 users in the house can consume 200-300gb per month and most of it at peak time. 

 

Currently I have a secondary ADSL connection, which I run some specific routes out of, but is painful at 1-2mbs! 

 

On RBI 3g was getting around 5-9mbs down, 3 mbs up and 4g randomly can get to 45mbs down and most of time get 25mbs up! but at night/peak times (not sure why) downloads drop top 3-10mbs. I have dual external antenna and about 4 km from the tower(line of site).

 

Been contemplating dropping the spark ADSL1 connection and getting another RBI connection via spark or VF directly, hence the question to understand long term play in RBI.

 

 


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  Reply # 1585286 3-Jul-2016 20:57
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thabass:

 

 

 

Thanks for response All. Very informative.

 

I'm already with ultimatebroadband and they do offer a 500gb (3g only) plan (250gb off peak), which is very attractive but the 5 users in the house can consume 200-300gb per month and most of it at peak time. 

 

Currently I have a secondary ADSL connection, which I run some specific routes out of, but is painful at 1-2mbs! 

 

On RBI 3g was getting around 5-9mbs down, 3 mbs up and 4g randomly can get to 45mbs down and most of time get 25mbs up! but at night/peak times (not sure why) downloads drop top 3-10mbs. I have dual external antenna and about 4 km from the tower(line of site).

 

Been contemplating dropping the spark ADSL1 connection and getting another RBI connection via spark or VF directly, hence the question to understand long term play in RBI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ild personally stick with the copper for bulk transfers, maybe route a little differently though.





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  Reply # 1585346 3-Jul-2016 22:46
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Where is this located? ADSL1 only?


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  Reply # 1585390 4-Jul-2016 07:57
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myfullflavour: There's only a limited amount of data (usually measured in Mbps) that can pass through a cellular sector.

For RBI 4G with the current technology, I believe it's about 120Mbps which works out to be approx 55 gigabytes per hour.

Datacaps are a way of managing this limited resource and ensuring everyone gets a fair shot.

From our perspective, as an RBI reseller, it appears 80GB might be a bit too generous as we're already seeing sectors that are overloaded. This unfortunately means in some cases we are now turning away prospective customers.

 

 

 

hmmm... In NZ are you sure it is not 400Mbps per sector? Obviously each device cannot consume that amount due to technology restrictions...


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  Reply # 1585394 4-Jul-2016 08:12
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jjnz1:

 

myfullflavour: There's only a limited amount of data (usually measured in Mbps) that can pass through a cellular sector.

For RBI 4G with the current technology, I believe it's about 120Mbps which works out to be approx 55 gigabytes per hour.

Datacaps are a way of managing this limited resource and ensuring everyone gets a fair shot.

From our perspective, as an RBI reseller, it appears 80GB might be a bit too generous as we're already seeing sectors that are overloaded. This unfortunately means in some cases we are now turning away prospective customers.

 

 

 

hmmm... In NZ are you sure it is not 400Mbps per sector? Obviously each device cannot consume that amount due to technology restrictions...

 

 

Capacity is going to depend on the site configuration. If it's running 700+1800+2600 it's pretty hard to calculate a "per sector" capacity, but it's going to be well in excess of 400Mbps - however you're not going to be able to hit that since most devices can't bond the 3 frequencies and I believe network support for this bonding is only available on a small number of sites.

 

 


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  Reply # 1585400 4-Jul-2016 08:47
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Current RBI end user equipment does not do carrier aggregation. The majority of the RBI connections we have are on 700Mhz which is where there is an approx 120Mbps throughput limit.

Even once C.A. Is supported, a lot of our users won't benefit as they are too far away or have marginal reception due to terrain, where only sub 1Ghz frequencies work.

Of course more spectrum might be opened up for LTE as time goes on, but I fear it'll always be to catch up with demand rather than getting ahead.

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  Reply # 1585401 4-Jul-2016 08:47
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thabass:

 

 

 

Thanks for response All. Very informative.

 

I'm already with ultimatebroadband and they do offer a 500gb (3g only) plan (250gb off peak), which is very attractive but the 5 users in the house can consume 200-300gb per month and most of it at peak time. 

 

Currently I have a secondary ADSL connection, which I run some specific routes out of, but is painful at 1-2mbs! 

 

On RBI 3g was getting around 5-9mbs down, 3 mbs up and 4g randomly can get to 45mbs down and most of time get 25mbs up! but at night/peak times (not sure why) downloads drop top 3-10mbs. I have dual external antenna and about 4 km from the tower(line of site).

 

Been contemplating dropping the spark ADSL1 connection and getting another RBI connection via spark or VF directly, hence the question to understand long term play in RBI.

 

 

 

 

Your 4G sounds exactly like mine. I also have dual antennas and I sometimes get up to 50 Mbps down during the day but whenever I want to actually stream something (evenings) my speed often drops to less than 2 Mbps. Very frustrating.

 

 





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  Reply # 1585933 4-Jul-2016 20:55
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quickymart:

 

Where is this located? ADSL1 only?

 

 

 

 

Greenpark, Christchurch. (GPK) <-  along forgotten exchange by Spark/Chorus. 

 

 

 

 




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  Reply # 1585937 4-Jul-2016 20:57
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thabass:

 

quickymart:

 

Where is this located? ADSL1 only?

 

 

Greenpark, Christchurch. (GPK) <-  along forgotten exchange by Spark/Chorus. 

 

 

Ok, when I looking up the exchange code, I randomly found this on google. Maybe adsl2, or lick of pain on an old building with its own outhouse!

 

Cabinet IDX Coordinates NZTMY Coordinates NZTM

 

Cabinet TypeCopper Feeder Host ExchangeFibre Feeder Host ExchangeAlternate Cabinet IDPlanned Date for cabinetisationNotification Update

 

GPK 1560214 5163111 Retrofit building GPK CH 01GPK1AC 31/07/16 31/05/16

 

More information here.


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