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18 posts

Geek


Topic # 13826 31-May-2007 00:25
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I needed to create a bootable floppy. Ah, simple, I thought. Apparently not.Frown

So how do I do that in Windows 2000 Pro? For something that's a basic essential, I'm finding it pretty difficult to do. Details aren't included in the Windows Help files.

I looked around on the web for relevant advice but nothing worked quite the way it sounded it should.

I tried creating an Emergency Repair Disk via Accessories / System Tools / Backup / Emergency Repair Disk, but when I tried to boot from that I got a DOS message "Ntldr is missing". More internet searching led me to believe that this file should be copied from the C drive root, along with Ntdetect.com and maybe Boot.ini as well. But with those files added, the disk boots up Windows 2000, whereas I only want it to start the machine in DOS so I can update the BIOS.

Hopefully, a Windows 98 bootable floppy, which I will try tonight, will be sufficient to start the machine in DOS, but what if I didn't have one of those ?

How should I do it on a Win 2000 machine ?

Interestingly, ntldr, ntdetect.com and boot.ini are all invisible files on my PC despite my having set the folder options to show hidden files. but until I found a way of tracking them down, I thought they were just missing. So I looked on the web and found that one reason for them to be missing might be out-of-date BIOS ! I nearly threw the PC out the window at that point, since I only needed to create a bootable floppy to enable a BIOS update ! Luckily, reason took precedence over tantrums and I decided my PC wouldn't boot at all if boot.ini was missing or corrupt, so I then figured out that boot.ini at least must be readable using Notepad, so I simply asked Notepad to open c:/ boot.ini (even though I couldn't see it and Search couldn't find it), and there it was.

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Master Geek


  Reply # 72927 31-May-2007 05:15
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1) Place diskette in the computer.
2) Open My Computer, right click the A: drive and click Format.
3) In the Format window, check Create an MS-DOS startup disk.
4)  Click Start.

Is this not what you're looking for?

35 posts

Geek


  Reply # 72930 31-May-2007 06:16
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here try this its much easy.

http://bootdisk.com/bootdisk.htm

they all working fine for sure.



18 posts

Geek


  Reply # 72948 31-May-2007 09:39
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Thanks, guys. I now have my bootable floppy !

Got another (bigger) problem now, though.

I followed the BIOS update instructions to the letter but the new BIOS wouldn't load properly. Now I dare not turn my machine off or it's dead....

Gonna try an earlier version of the BIOS update (the original isn't available on ASRock's site for some reason), but if this doesn't work then I think I'm looking at the prospect of a new motherboard Cry 

BDFL - Memuneh
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Reply # 72954 31-May-2007 09:48
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A failed update could be fixed in a repair shop - if they have access to the right tools or a comparable motherboard.





35 posts

Geek


  Reply # 72962 31-May-2007 10:15
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even Corrupted BIOS can be fixed by BIOS flash with right or stable firmware version. get most stable version from ASROCK website and flash & try,



18 posts

Geek


  Reply # 72994 31-May-2007 11:47
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I did get the BIOS and Flash ROM program from the ASRock website.

Weirdly, the machine still boots and shows it now has the latest BIOS version, despite having claimed it was unable to update the ROM, so I'm assuming the CMOS (only) has been successfully updated. I had to Load BIOS defaults to avoid having to 'Press F1 to load defaults' due to the checksum error at bootup, though.

Annoyingly, the whole reason I wanted to update the BIOS - getting the system to recognise a disk bigger than about 130Gb - has not been achieved. It still thinks the new 250Gb drive is 127Gb. There are already two 115Gb drives in there which work OK, and I remember setting the machine up originally for large drives at the original installation.

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