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Topic # 56312 13-Jan-2010 10:24
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A warning for those not already aware of this "feature" of Norton 360 (version 3). At the end of the subscription period all functions are disabled (no antivirus, firewall, backup, etc) except for the ability to restore from backups previously made.

This is a major departure from previous subscription arrangements from Symantec. It used to be that the subscription related solely to the ability to access updates to the virus signature database. It appears the current arrangement is to simply disable all of the protective features at the end of the subscription period. This change in policy was not at all abvious to me (although, using my magnifying glass, I now see the 6-point type on the top of the box states that I get the right to use the product for the service period for one year). I was used to letting Symantec products expire and then casually checking out the different offers (subscription renewal vs new retail box) and taking the risk that I had exposure to new viruses identified following end of subscription until I renewed or installed a fresh product.

My gripe is not so much to do with the naked greed in forcing customers to renew/replace immediately - that's a perfectly fine commercial choice (notwithstanding my pejorative characterisation). What leaves me a little fromaged-off is that these [expletive deleted] people do not make it crystal clear that the product is rendered inoperable as at the termination date.

Has this become the new standard for AV packages generally or is Symantec a <tongue-in-cheek>"market leader"</tongue-in-cheek> in this respect?

Grrrr!!

On the plus side there is free beer and pizza in my future so all is well with the world. Cool

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  Reply # 289638 13-Jan-2010 14:15
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Typical of Symantec. I don't see this behaviour with ESET NOD32. Not sure for any others.




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  Reply # 289667 13-Jan-2010 15:05
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With Vista and Windows 7 you can get enough protection by just using the Windows firewall and one of the good free antivirus products ie: Microsoft Security Essentials or Avira AntiVir, or Avast.

Plenty of free options for backup too depending on whether you want file/folder backup or disk imaging.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 289672 13-Jan-2010 15:19
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I would just use avast free home edition

www.avast.com

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  Reply # 289747 13-Jan-2010 18:21
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ups for free avast. go with Nod32 if you want to pay.

avast very good :)

wouldnt touch a norton/symantic product with a 3000 foot barge pole accept to remove it from a computer alltogether

edit/update apart from the old norton/symantic ghost i love that product




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16Mb (EDO RAM), K6-II processor, 2Mb of onboard graphics. 32k dial up modem. 12 speed CD ROM. 5¼-inch floppy drive. 500Mb HDD.



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  Reply # 289990 14-Jan-2010 13:54
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Thank you all for the alternative recommendations. It may be time for a change - although to be fair the Norton product has improved out of sight over the past year (although they started from a low base admittedly) and it is not the performance hog that it once was.

Just had a quick troll of reviews for avast and it has lots of support out there - maybe there *is* such a thing as a free lunch!!

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  Reply # 289991 14-Jan-2010 13:55
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You should try Norton Internet Security 2010 - it's way lighter and faster than before. I have it on my mini laptop. On my laptop I just run Microsoft Security Essentials.




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  Reply # 289994 14-Jan-2010 14:05
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One could argue in some respects that disabling the product entirely is less damaging than leaving it running with no updates.

People could believe they're protected so won't either buy a new subscription or replace the product when in reality they're not protected from any new security threats.

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  Reply # 289995 14-Jan-2010 14:12
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One of the things that annoys me with Norton is the fact that it comes bundled with most new laptops. None of my family run Norton - and I wouldn't say that any/many of them have enough computer skills to be able to run it effectively and still be able to get the full functionality out of their machines. This leaves me trying to fix up all their computers constantly.

Just the other day 2 members of my family rang me to say they had purchased new laptops and couldn't get rid of some Norton 'errors', nor could they uninstall Norton. I managed to get them to install an alternate free anti-virus, but that still left me having to go and uninstall Norton so that their computers no longer came up with 'errors'. The 'errors' were Norton setup boxes reminding them that they needed to setup the security to work properly.

Lol....antivirus software - gotta love it.

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  Reply # 289997 14-Jan-2010 14:18
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Dharil: One of the things that annoys me with Norton is the fact that it comes bundled with most new laptops. None of my family run Norton - and I wouldn't say that any/many of them have enough computer skills to be able to run it effectively and still be able to get the full functionality out of their machines. This leaves me trying to fix up all their computers constantly.

Just the other day 2 members of my family rang me to say they had purchased new laptops and couldn't get rid of some Norton 'errors', nor could they uninstall Norton. I managed to get them to install an alternate free anti-virus, but that still left me having to go and uninstall Norton so that their computers no longer came up with 'errors'. The 'errors' were Norton setup boxes reminding them that they needed to setup the security to work properly.

Lol....antivirus software - gotta love it.


Norton obviously offer the cheapest deals for OEM's.. I know I can buy an OEM copy of NIS for just on $20, I'm sure PC makers are paying absolute peanuts for it.


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  Reply # 289998 14-Jan-2010 14:20
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sbiddle:
Norton obviously offer the cheapest deals for OEM's.. I know I can buy an OEM copy of NIS for just on $20, I'm sure PC makers are paying absolute peanuts for it.



Very true - the only issue then comes when the end-user has no idea how to run/setup/maintain the antivirus.  There are other antivirus systems, pay and free ones, that are much easier to teach less computer literate people to maintain.

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  Reply # 290006 14-Jan-2010 14:40
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NIS has improved in the last 12 months I must say

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  Reply # 290021 14-Jan-2010 15:30
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Thanks for the heads up, I'm running Norton 360 V3 and have father in-law using 1 of the 3 licences it come with, he has no idea about this sort of thing and I would have assumed an expired version still offered basic protection.
I've actaully been pretty happy with Norton 360, although havn't had much experience with advast, might check it out before subscription expires.
Thanks again.



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  Reply # 290038 14-Jan-2010 16:39
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sbiddle: One could argue in some respects that disabling the product entirely is less damaging than leaving it running with no updates.

People could believe they're protected so won't either buy a new subscription or replace the product when in reality they're not protected from any new security threats.


I would agree but for the fact that about 6-8 weeks before expiry I was getting a nag screen every week or so and in the week leading up to expiry was nagged every time I turned on the machine with the warning that my CPU would shortly be condom-less. I would have to have be a certified moron not to know I would be running with no updates after expiry. That said, I am one of those strange people who actually reads pop-up messages rather than simply cancelling them sight unseen.

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  Reply # 290070 14-Jan-2010 18:15
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sbiddle: Norton obviously offer the cheapest deals for OEM's.. I know I can buy an OEM copy of NIS for just on $20, I'm sure PC makers are paying absolute peanuts for it.

You have it backwards.  For the large white box manufacturers, Symantec pays them to install it.




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  Reply # 290077 14-Jan-2010 18:28
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.. and then recovers the cost + profit from the end user when they have to renew their subscription for the product to continue working

The free solutions are good enough to get the job done these days.

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