Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




114 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


Topic # 205614 19-Nov-2016 17:24
Send private message

Hi, 

 

Can someone advise a VHF/UHF frequency that I can call in case of emergency (call for a help or something like when mobile/phone line is down)?

 

The only one that I'm thinking about is a marine channel 16.

 

I'm in WLG.

 


Cheers, 

 

 

 

 

 

 


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2

TLD

695 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 153


  Reply # 1701073 10-Jan-2017 18:07
Send private message

UHF CB Channel 5 is considered an emergency channel.  Sometimes used duplex with channel 35 (for input)





Trevor Dennis
Rapaura (near Blenheim)

27481 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6949

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1701088 10-Jan-2017 18:56
Send private message

Simple answer is there isn't one. A UHF CB freq relies on a random person listening at the time.

 

 


 
 
 
 


2990 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 343


  Reply # 1701132 10-Jan-2017 21:16
Send private message

Someone asked this in our local PRS facey just recently

 

Best bet would be a dual/tri bander on CH11 AM and hope a trucky was a. near b. listening c. not swapped out his CB for Teamtalk/Fleetlink

 

Aussies rely on UHF for the distance over AM, so the do use them a lot more religiously than here in kiwiland. Theres  PRS repeater in wellington we can sometimes hit from here you should jump on and have a natter to the lads with

 

http://prswellington.wixsite.com/prs-wellington


12413 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4103

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1701314 11-Jan-2017 11:31
Send private message

PRS facey

 

 

 

What now?






165 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 66


  Reply # 1701322 11-Jan-2017 11:37
Send private message

Geektastic:

 

PRS facey

 

 

 

What now?

 

 

PRS facebook group.




114 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1702898 13-Jan-2017 20:20
Send private message

Nice to have some feedback on my post finally :-). 

 

So, the answer is NO. 

 

That sounds quite disappointing. Especially in NZ, where earthquakes are not unusual and tsunamis are possible.

 

What communication should be used by regular people in case if mobile network is not functioning and no electricity at your house? Smoke signals, I presume...

 

It looks like HAM folks are manly busy with protecting their frequencies from regular people and some of them are saying that  even PRS channel 8 is for "radio enthusiasts" and shouldn't be used by anyone else...

 

Wouldn't it be great if HAM folks dedicate some of their many repeaters (that are silent 99.9% of time) for the purposes of emergency communications with regular 'non ham' operators?


Glurp
9275 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4307

Subscriber

  Reply # 1702899 13-Jan-2017 20:26
Send private message

spoonboy:

 

Nice to have some feedback on my post finally :-). 

 

So, the answer is NO. 

 

That sounds quite disappointing. Especially in NZ, where earthquakes are not unusual and tsunamis are possible.

 

What communication should be used by regular people in case if mobile network is not functioning and no electricity at your house? Smoke signals, I presume...

 

It looks like HAM folks are manly busy with protecting their frequencies from regular people and some of them are saying that  even PRS channel 8 is for "radio enthusiasts" and shouldn't be used by anyone else...

 

Wouldn't it be great if HAM folks dedicate some of their many repeaters (that are silent 99.9% of time) for the purposes of emergency communications with regular 'non ham' operators?

 

 

Not sure about the rules in this country but elsewhere it is not even legal for a licensed ham to communicate with an unlicensed operator.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


8150 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2745

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1702902 13-Jan-2017 20:41
Send private message

well if your cell phone network is down you can still make emergency calls on another providers network




114 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1702916 13-Jan-2017 21:54
Send private message

 

Not sure about the rules in this country but elsewhere it is not even legal for a licensed ham to communicate with an unlicensed operator.

 

 

 

I think that this is applicable to the HAM frequencies only.  




114 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1702921 13-Jan-2017 22:11
Send private message

Jase2985:

 

well if your cell phone network is down you can still make emergency calls on another providers network

 

 

This is true. But you should take into account that not all mobiles can work with all nz operators as they are using different standards. 

 

As well, some operators are sharing equipment, so, that if one base station is down you can loose more than one operator.


17 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 3


  Reply # 1702955 13-Jan-2017 22:36
Send private message

if earthquakes and tsunamis are you concern, if things are that bad that you need help, I am not sure there is going to be anyone to talk to in range of a CB radio and repeaters could easy be down too

 

Best to get a satellite phone then or qualify as a ham radio operator where you can use enough power to get more range


3439 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1394

Subscriber

  Reply # 1702983 13-Jan-2017 23:14
Send private message

Only other option would be one of those personal locator beacons like what mountaineers use. As they use satellites. And even that should only be used if you are unable to make a 111 call. The HAM frequencies, CB ect are not monitored by the emergency services. So should only be a last resort.

 

If you are that worried then get a backup power system so you will still have working internet / VOIP during a power cut. (Constant Vigil Lite if you want an off the shelf solution). A means of charging your cellphone during a power cut (car charger). And a cellphone that is capable of being used on all 3 networks.








114 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1703012 14-Jan-2017 00:01
Send private message

Aredwood:

 

Only other option would be one of those personal locator beacons like what mountaineers use. As they use satellites. And even that should only be used if you are unable to make a 111 call. The HAM frequencies, CB ect are not monitored by the emergency services. So should only be a last resort.

 

If you are that worried then get a backup power system so you will still have working internet / VOIP during a power cut. (Constant Vigil Lite if you want an off the shelf solution). A means of charging your cellphone during a power cut (car charger). And a cellphone that is capable of being used on all 3 networks.

 

 

I've considered the beacons as well. They are not quite designed for the purpose. They can inform your location, but you're not getting a response/confirmation and can't talk to describe your situation and what kind of help you need. Emergency services will be heavily overloaded and working based on a priority . What would be your priority if they don't know your condition?

 

Now, regarding the reliability of landline services. 

 

At the last year 7.8 earthquake I monitored both the geonet and chorus web sites in a real time and there was quite an obvious correlation between the  earthquake affected areas and network failures. You could effectively see the earthquake location on the chorus site.




114 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1703014 14-Jan-2017 00:12
Send private message

vpsnine:

 

if earthquakes and tsunamis are you concern, if things are that bad that you need help, I am not sure there is going to be anyone to talk to in range of a CB radio and repeaters could easy be down too

 

Best to get a satellite phone then or qualify as a ham radio operator where you can use enough power to get more range

 

 

NZ ham repeaters are actually part of the AREC framework and probably prepared for situations . But the advantage of the 2 way radio is that you can actually communicate even if repeater is down. 

 

 


631 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 124


  Reply # 1703019 14-Jan-2017 03:22
Send private message

Sorry finding it hard to read these messages, video ads take up 1/4 of the screen in Firefox with Geekzone again. Hard to read on a 1024x768 monitor the two to three lines that squeeze under the ads.

 

I use PRS gear. Some enthusiasts have radios that jump to an active channel when strong enough. That's how I got in to a conversation with a guy only minutes after I bought some 2 Watt handhelds. I keep one at home and the other in the car, both within range of each other. In hindsight I should have bought a 5W handheld however the price jump is a lot higher, and for the most part I only bought them to communicate when up a transmission tower or on the road in convoy.

 

There is no official emergency channel like in Australia. I find it a bit silly the emergency channel is separate from their calling channel. It's kind of pointless unless you monitor both at the same time. At least with marine the emergency channel can be used for brief calling before switching channels so at least others nearby are listening for calls and emergencies on channel 16.


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.