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Topic # 29753 17-Jan-2009 23:03
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Had a note in the letterbox today - it said that over the last couple of weeks burglaries on my street and a couple close by were double, or triple,  the normal rate. 

My first thought was not over most of the stuff that I would lose if anyone pinched it but more how much i would lose if they stole my HTPC.  Its not the HTPC itself though - i'd probably do ok out of the insurance - but I have all my photos and videos stored on there.
 
So today I embarked on performing a full backup of all the photo and videos to DVDs.  I've done backups before, but they are such a pain that i do them infrequently.  Anyway, this time i needed 8 dual layer DVDs to back everything up on which is some 60-70GB of photos and videos! (and by videos, i mean from the camera/camcorder, not from teh internet, or recorded tv).  Because I have a new baby and an HD camcorder the rate at which this collection is growing means that I will probably need double that space, at least, in another year which begs the question - whats the best way to handle these backups now.....

In the past I have relied on flickr and other online photo repositories to keep a backup of my photos which works great (and is fireproof!), but when the volume of photos skyrockets, and the dsl upload speeds remains constant, flickr and other online options become less attractive.  Also its not easy to manage backing your snaps up to these places as you have to choose what to upload, rather than sync a directory.

There are some online backup companies that give you tools to backup your PC (or folders) by sending only the changes up - these are ideal, but usually quite expensive per GB of storage.

HDD's are cheap now, so are SD/Flash products, but not necessarily easy to work with backup products and i'm not sure i'd trust them long term either.

DVD-R's are cheap, DVD-R DL's are less so, but both are also painful to use with backup software - i dont want a .bkp file or other, i'd rather the files are saved simply as files on the discs so I dont need to reinstall nero, or whatever, to get the data back again.

Blu-Ray discs have decent capacity, but recorders and media are still quite expensive.  I'd still have the same problem with saving as 'backup files' or original files though.

What do you do to protect your precious photos and other digital media these days?

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  Reply # 190274 17-Jan-2009 23:09
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Have a look at http://www.mozy.com

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  Reply # 190279 17-Jan-2009 23:23
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I remember discussing this topic a couple months back with some other Geekzone members. What I reccomend is the Drobo, basically a hard drive bay. You put up to 4 hard drives in and it turns it into one big hard drive. If a hard drive fails it is repaired by the drive bay, this has worked for a lot of people and allows for a lot of data storage. Sure it is quite expensive but it depends how much you value your photo and video collection.

Sure, this is not foolproof, it's still prone to physical damage (fire, burglaries etc), this is where online data storage is also useful.

I hope you find the right storage medium!

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Reply # 190283 17-Jan-2009 23:30
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Mozy Backup is not expensive at all at US$4.95 a month. It's much cheaper than you losing all your digital content.

I have a Windows Home Server with 2.5TB where I store videos, photos, copies of documents folders and full image backups. I have a Mozy account for my laptop with about 90GB uploaded. I also use Mozy Pro for my servers with about 20GB uploaded.

Backup is ok, but if someone steals your Drobo or Windows Home Server box at the same time as they take your laptop, or if the house burns down while you are out for dinner then there's nothing but an off site backup that will help you.




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  Reply # 190310 18-Jan-2009 08:49
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Just to add to the home server solution. It has a tool for backing up the data on itself. You just stick in an external drive and tell it what you want to backup. It keeps a database of what is on the drive so that it only copies over what has changed rather then the whole lot each time. I have not checked but I think you can back it up to more then one hard drive too (dupication).

You then just take the external HDD to a different location. Fireproof backup.. done.

I know it is not a very cheap option but you don't have to buy a new PC to setup home server a old P4 will do the trick. The extra safety that it provides for both your other PC's by having them backed up, the safety of having things like your photos dupicated on two HDD's in case one fails and the ability to easily backup the data that is on it and store that off site makes it a great option.







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  Reply # 190312 18-Jan-2009 08:59
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I have a Windows Home Server running on a P4 HT with 2.5GB RAM and 2.5TB total storage. It's a great solution and with Power Pack 1 (which is more like a Service Pack) you can backup the contents of specific folders, and with some free add-in tool you can backup the backups from your PCs.

The problem is cost. Mozy is US$4.95/month while adding HDD to your home server will cost you for each drive. I have seven drives on my system (4x 500GB, 1x 320, 1x 80GB SSD and 1x 160GB system drive). I have about 200GB free and I am thinking of getting another 2x 1TB so that I can enable duplication on my movie folders (which is not about 600GB), replacing 2x 500GB drives.

With an online backup you don't have to worry, it's automatic and you don't have to take the drive outside...




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  Reply # 190319 18-Jan-2009 09:35
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I use a maxtor 740Gb One Touch USB drive, I like it a I have set the button on the drive to image the whole system, Just plug into port wait a moment, press the button and then make coffee. If I need to restore insert a cd that comes with the drive and hey presto. But like any backup no good if you leave it beside the PC 24/7 in case of emergency

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  Reply # 190339 18-Jan-2009 11:36
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This may sound silly but what about good ol tapes?

I know some of them have HUGE capacity??

Just my $0.02



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  Reply # 190375 18-Jan-2009 14:48
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mozy sounds quite good price-wise.  a few years ago it used to cost you $20 per GB!  I might look into that a bit more.  Especially if I can do differential folder backups with it.  Definately safer against fire and burglar.  The other option, i guess, is getting together with a few friends and dropping a colo box in one of the data centers.

regarding drobo - nowhere to fit one in the HTPC... and I dont have a home server (yet).  I expect that the home server plus drobo solution would cost as much per month in power as the mozy option..

the one touch drives are good, but the data is still on a low cost sata/ide drive which are notorious for failing at the wrong time!  Thats why I prefer raid mirrors for my critical data.

tape drives are not exactly cheap either - not for ones with decent volume.  also, most of them are scsi based requiring additional cards to be added to the setup.




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  Reply # 190378 18-Jan-2009 14:55
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chrisjunkie: This may sound silly but what about good ol tapes?

I know some of them have HUGE capacity??

Just my $0.02


The largest I have seen that you can pickup for a semi-reasonable price are around 200GB compressed capacity. I wouldn't call that HUGE!

I run Raid5 for redundancy, and a 750GB drive that I keep offsite and update about once a month





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  Reply # 190381 18-Jan-2009 15:03
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At US$0.5 per gig you certantly couldn't use mozy for any mass storage backup. 1 Terrabyte of data, which isn't uncommon now days would be close on $800 nz dollars per month! You could buy  3 1 tb drives for that!




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  Reply # 190383 18-Jan-2009 15:35
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Filterer: At US$0.5 per gig you certantly couldn't use mozy for any mass storage backup. 1 Terrabyte of data, which isn't uncommon now days would be close on $800 nz dollars per month! You could buy  3 1 tb drives for that!


Where do you get US$0.5 per gig.. for home use it seems to be $4.95 USD for unlimited storage?







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  Reply # 190385 18-Jan-2009 15:45
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I looked at Mozy but I have multiple PC's that I need to backup and their pricing is only per PC which is mental IMO.

JungleDisk is what I'm using and highly recommend it. They only charge for what you upload and store and don't care how many PC's you put the client software on.  Your data is also stored with Amazon via their S3 service as well.

JungleDisk/S3 pricing in USD...
Storage
  $0.15 per GB-Month of storage used 
Data Transfer
  $0.10 per GB of data uploaded
  $0.17 per GB of data downloaded
Requests
  $0.01 per 1,000 upload requests
  $0.01 per 10,000 download requests




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  Reply # 190387 18-Jan-2009 15:54
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Nety:
Filterer: At US$0.5 per gig you certantly couldn't use mozy for any mass storage backup. 1 Terrabyte of data, which isn't uncommon now days would be close on $800 nz dollars per month! You could buy  3 1 tb drives for that!


Where do you get US$0.5 per gig.. for home use it seems to be $4.95 USD for unlimited storage?


On closer inspection it looks like you are right, I run server 2008 though, so sounds like I would need the pro verison




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  Reply # 190390 18-Jan-2009 16:20
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Filterer: At US$0.5 per gig you certantly couldn't use mozy for any mass storage backup. 1 Terrabyte of data, which isn't uncommon now days would be close on $800 nz dollars per month! You could buy  3 1 tb drives for that!


Some comments... This is the price for Mozy Pro, not the consumer version. On Mozy Pro you will backup your data mainly - SQL Server, Exchange Server, webserver files, etc. If you have 1 TB of this type of data then $800/month in backup is not a problem.

I use Mozy Pro and have about 2GB uploaded - this is the Geekzone server (SQL, webserver files) and my Exchange Server - although if you look on my servers you will see I have about 600GB of disc space - OS, the virtual machines running the show, etc. But not everything is on the backup only the data.





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  Reply # 190456 19-Jan-2009 00:10
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Filterer:
The largest I have seen that you can pickup for a semi-reasonable price are around 200GB compressed capacity. I wouldn't call that HUGE!


Installed an LTO-4 tape library on a customer site a little while back - fibre channel interface, about 36-40 tapes in the library, each 800GB raw and about twice that compressed. I can't be bothered working out how many TB that is. But certainly not cheap. Not sure what a single LTO-2, LTO-3 or LTO-4 drive will set you back, but a USB 2.0 hard drive is probably a better deal for most.

If you have other valuables, consider investing in a safe (preferably a strong one that is bolted to the floor), and use that to store your backups.

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