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Topic # 30708 18-Feb-2009 15:56
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on my wall at home i have a wall power socket like everyone. it has two sockets to plug things in. currently i have a board that has 6 power sockets and i plug this into one of the wall sockets. i have a computer, stereo, cellphone charger, printer etc that are always on, and i'm just wondering what is the maximum amount of power that a wall socket can give out before it over-loads.
 for example, if i had two power boards each with 6 sockets which would total 12 sockets and i plugged 12 computers into them and turned them all on, will the wall socket overload?

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Reply # 196535 18-Feb-2009 16:14
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I am not an electrician...

The max load is determined by the circuit breaker (or fuse in older homes) to the relevant points on the circuit.  These are rated to certain amps and would trip if overloaded.

I am not an electrician...




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  Reply # 196537 18-Feb-2009 16:17
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richgamer: on my wall at home i have a wall power socket like everyone. it has two sockets to plug things in. currently i have a board that has 6 power sockets and i plug this into one of the wall sockets. i have a computer, stereo, cellphone charger, printer etc that are always on, and i'm just wondering what is the maximum amount of power that a wall socket can give out before it over-loads.
 for example, if i had two power boards each with 6 sockets which would total 12 sockets and i plugged 12 computers into them and turned them all on, will the wall socket overload?

It's not about the sockets, it's about how much drain the appliances put on the circuit your wall socket is connected to, how many other wall sockets around the building are in the same circuit, what the appliance drain is on those other wall sockets and what rating of fuse is protecting that particular circuit.

EDIT:  I'm showing my age by referring to fuses... As stevonz says "circuit breakers" are much more relevant.

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  Reply # 196542 18-Feb-2009 16:21
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Max rated load for any standard outlet is 10A from memory = 2400W. So as soon as you plug in a fan heater and put it on high thats it.

Depends what the computers are drawing. 2400W / 12 = 200W each, so low power PCs or PCs not doing any work should be OK.



stevonz: I am not an electrician...


What he said


EDIT: Hmmmmm you're talking about 2 sockets so double that to 400W. Doesn't sound right though does it, I wouldn't risk it! Check your 6 way boards, I think you will find they are rated to 2400W each also.

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  Reply # 196543 18-Feb-2009 16:26
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Everyone has covered it....

As scott said 10A at 240V = 2400W

And it will depend on the powerboards as to what will cut out first, the overload protection in the powerboard or the circuit breaker in the 'fuse box'.

Another thing you have to remember, is that turning devices on one by one may mean that you stay under the 2400W mark. But if you were to flick the switch on at the wall, while every device is turned on, you could go well and truely over that 2400W mark.
Each device will draw more current when first powering on, than it does while in use or idling. With the exception of fans/heaters. (That includes your curling irons Tongue out)


I AM NOT AN ELECTRICIAN.

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  Reply # 196563 18-Feb-2009 17:28
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10A is a standard household circuit.

The thing to remember is that this is *per circuit*, not per socket. Typically speaking an average house will normally have between 2-5 circuits for the power sockets and generally up to around 3-4 sockets per circuit.

Thigs will vary considerable depending on the age of the house and whether the board has been upgraded over time.


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  Reply # 196569 18-Feb-2009 17:37
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I may be wrong here but I thought power point circuits ran on a 20A fuse/breaker and lighting circuits run on 10A.
 




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  Reply # 196570 18-Feb-2009 17:39
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CYaBro: I may be wrong here but I thought power point circuits ran on a 20A fuse/breaker and lighting circuits run on 10A.
?


There are 2 x 20A and 2 x 16A in this near new house. 2 x 10A for the lights.

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  Reply # 196590 18-Feb-2009 19:53
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hey there,  10a per socket is right, even fairly old sockets have this rating, yet they tend to be single sockets.
the protection at the board will be rated to the size of cable run, generally speaking, sockets are wired in 2.5mm copper wich i put on a 20AMCB ( circuit breaker), lights are run in a smaller 1.5mm cable so only put a max of 16A on them. 
 as mentioned earlyer, there will be more than just one socket on that circuit breaker, so not only will your multiboxes that pluged into that socket add to the total on that circuit, but what ever else you  have pluged in on that same circuit. ( BTW, i am a sparky)

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