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Topic # 95591 9-Jan-2012 02:21
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Sorry if photo is a bit big, but I haven't taken the time to down size it. 
Any way. I went out tonight, drove car home around 10 and hear a hissing, but a light one. Since it was cold out, I thought it might be the rain dripping on the hot engine or something, didn't think much of it, and put keys inside and went out again (mate was waiting to take me in his car).

Came home like, 10minutes ago (2.10am) and sure enough, tire was on the ground, completely flat.

Now, last time this happened, I didn't realise until I had driven half way to school and the tire was completely destroyed, so this time it should be repairable to some extent. But the problem lies with me changing it. As you can see by the picture, it is currently parked on a cobble stone driveway. I'm a bit wary of jacking it up on this thing since its a bit un-even and kind of scared of ruining car/hurting myself quite badly. How can I do this without causing harm to me or the car? Plus, I don't really know how to change it since my granddad did it for me last time since I had to go to school. Any mechanics do free on-site tire changes?Hahaha. I know its a long shot but I thought I'd ask. Any tips btw since I doubt I'll find someone to do it for me.

-Sam.
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Bachelor of Computing Systems (2015)

 

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Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 566340 9-Jan-2012 02:50

tardtasticx: Sorry if photo is a bit big, but I haven't taken the time to down size it. 
Any way. I went out tonight, drove car home around 10 and hear a hissing, but a light one. Since it was cold out, I thought it might be the rain dripping on the hot engine or something, didn't think much of it, and put keys inside and went out again (mate was waiting to take me in his car).

Came home like, 10minutes ago (2.10am) and sure enough, tire was on the ground, completely flat.

Now, last time this happened, I didn't realise until I had driven half way to school and the tire was completely destroyed, so this time it should be repairable to some extent. But the problem lies with me changing it. As you can see by the picture, it is currently parked on a cobble stone driveway. I'm a bit wary of jacking it up on this thing since its a bit un-even and kind of scared of ruining car/hurting myself quite badly. How can I do this without causing harm to me or the car? Plus, I don't really know how to change it since my granddad did it for me last time since I had to go to school. Any mechanics do free on-site tire changes?Hahaha. I know its a long shot but I thought I'd ask. Any tips btw since I doubt I'll find someone to do it for me.

-Sam.
#whitewhine #firstworldproblems  


You could always call the AA - youth membership is only $40 or so (slightly more if you live in Auckland) and you can join on the spot.

Failing that, what you want to do is:
a) Make sure the hand brake is on (and the car is in park if it is an automatic)
b) Chock the opposite wheel with bits of wood, flattened coke can (wedge front and back so it doesn't move)
c) Place the jack under the frame of the car near the tyre that needs changing.  Often there is a marked point where the body has been reinforced
d) Raise the jack so the car is supported, but not so much that the tyre is airborne
e) Remove the hubcap and loosen the lug nuts by turning anticlockwise
f) Raise the jack further so there is enough clearance to remove the tyre
g) Remove the lug nuts and then the tyre
h) Place the spare on the hub, then replace the lug nuts, tightening by hand
i) Lower the car so the wheel is touching the ground, then tighten the lug nuts.  Some people suggest you do this in a star-shaped pattern criss-crossing the centre in order to distribute the load (probably doesn't really matter)
j) Lower the car further, remove the jack and further tighten the lug nuts. 

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  Reply # 566341 9-Jan-2012 02:51

Cobblestone driveway ought to be OK, by the way.  If you are worried that the car is unstable, then lower the jack and reposition until you are happy.

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  Reply # 566346 9-Jan-2012 05:49
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If you don't know how to chnage a car tire you should not be driving a car!

I have changed tires on gravel and uneven surfaces many times no issue, You can tell if the car is stable or not by the way the jack is sitting under the car when winding up the jack to lift the car

As already pointed out above make sure you losen the wheel nuts before jacking up the car!


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  Reply # 566347 9-Jan-2012 06:15
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Basically as KevinL says... here is a video which explains what he was saying: http://www.ehow.com/video_1863_change-flat-tire.html

gzt

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  Reply # 566349 9-Jan-2012 06:49
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c1) put a bit of 6x2 or similar on the ground and put the jack on top of that to give it stability.

If you are going to do it watch two or three video guides first.

The jack position and orientation are critical.

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  Reply # 566352 9-Jan-2012 07:00
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Don't forget to remove the plastic hub cap the nuts to remove the rim are under that. Do you need a guide how to remove that?

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  Reply # 566364 9-Jan-2012 08:16
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Is it on a hill? If it's on the flat then It'll be ok. But I do recommend a plank or something under the jack otherwise you could mark the stones. If you care that is.

How far did you drive flat on it? A couple of hundred meters will be enough to ruin it.
Also get into the habit of lookng at your tyres all the time. When I walk to my car I always glance at them. Doesn't take much to spot an under inflated one instantly. Tyres are the number 1 safety thing on your car.

Plus loosen the nuts (just crack them) Before you take any weight on the jack. Makes it easier if it's a small car (looks like it is) and they have been done up by a monkey with a rattle gun.

When you tighten them do not swing on it. Just tweak them up, depends on your strength. If you can borrow a torque wrench and do them up to 75-80ish ft lbs then give them a little tweak by hand so you learn how tight they should be. Yes, they can be too tight and that is almost as bad as too loose.

And OT wheel changing and oil checking etc should be part of the license test! Do you know how to check oil? Can you find your dip stick? (snigger)

Yes I am a car guy frustrated by mates who can't even find their dipstick Yell

 

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  Reply # 566366 9-Jan-2012 08:33
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just get AA to do it for you. i personally wont bother changing it myself





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  Reply # 566374 9-Jan-2012 09:07
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Naked: yah I can change one, but I wouldn't by choice, I have an AA membership and they are faster and smarter at it than I am.

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  Reply # 566384 9-Jan-2012 09:21
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I have a 25 year old at my work who didn't know how to change a tyre as well. Well to be correct, he did swap the flat for the spare, but, put the wheel nuts on the wrong way round. For those who are aware of the shape of wheel nuts, you will understand the significance of that.

gzt

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  Reply # 566386 9-Jan-2012 09:23
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VTNZ also offer a roadside assist. Not as good as AA but lower cost.

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  Reply # 566389 9-Jan-2012 09:27
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If you are worried about it falling of the jack when you put the spare one on the when you take the flat off put it under the edge of the car so if it does fall it will fall on to the tire.  I also do this when changing break pads.  It is probably unnecessary but it can't hurt and it was some thing I was taught to do when I was 14 before I was allowed to start driving.

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  Reply # 566396 9-Jan-2012 09:47
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blackjack17: If you are worried about it falling of the jack when you put the spare one on the when you take the flat off put it under the edge of the car so if it does fall it will fall on to the tire.  I also do this when changing break pads.  It is probably unnecessary but it can't hurt and it was some thing I was taught to do when I was 14 before I was allowed to start driving.


Good tip. I use to be a mechanic and even with all the right gear in a workshop I did this. At the very least is one less thing to trip over..

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  Reply # 566397 9-Jan-2012 09:49
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Same, one of those things I started doing so long ago I can't remember why.
Also I am in the habit of putting the nuts in the wheel or on the foot of the jack.
So you don't lose one.

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  Reply # 566403 9-Jan-2012 10:27
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My father gave me a very through lesson in changing tyres (and a few other things) before he'd let me drive the car. Try asking your Dad for help, or an older brother, or uncle, or friendly neighbour.

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