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Topic # 96977 8-Feb-2012 16:14
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Anyone here own a paddle ski/surf ski/sit-on-top-kayak ?

Im looking at getting one to potter about Whangaparoa Penisula on but have no real idea what to watch out for when purchasing one second hand etc....

Thanks




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  Reply # 578762 8-Feb-2012 16:23
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I have two plastic sit-on kayaks. One I got second hand, the other new. I recommend making sure it has a decent seat, a paddle lanyard comes in handy too.
When buying second-hand, if possible get a test drive, to check for personal comfort (can check by sitting in on dry land, but its not the same), freeboard, and leaks.
built in sealable compartments are handy for packing a lunch/camera/etc.
If buying new, go direct to the factory, and look for seconds - often the reason its a second is a fault in coloring, not a physical problem.

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  Reply # 578807 8-Feb-2012 17:26
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I looked into this a lot about three years ago. 

A lot of if depends on what you want the Kayak for, sounds familiar on these boards, eh?

Expedition type kayaks are long and thin. They are build to be easy to paddle a long way with less effort. The downside is that they are not so stable, particularly when not moving forward. They are very unstable if you are stationary and the swell is hitting you on the beam. 

Fishing type kayaks are wider and shorter. They are very stable even when stationary and not too bad when the swell is on the beam. They are set up so you can sit in them for a while and have places to stow gear and fish. But, they are not so easy to fast or easy to paddle. By this I mean they require more energy to go a given distance at a given speed than the expedition type.

The 'much around' type is mostly like the fishing type but without so many features, like canvas seats. They are cheap but not so specialised. 

The main name I saw coming up a lot with good reviews was Viking.

http://www.vikingkayaks.co.nz/ 

If you are really ambitious you could try one of these...

http://www.missionkayaking.com/shop/KAYAKS/Beach2/SWITCH.html 

I wanted one but the rest of life got in the way.

Say away from surf skis unless you just want to play in the breakers off the beach. They are very unstable unless you are being pushed forward by a wave. 

Jack  




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  Reply # 578854 8-Feb-2012 18:29
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I agree with Jack it all depends on what you want the Kayak for ie fishing or just paddling etc

I brought a ocean kayak prowler 4.7 elite which is great for fishing and paddling.  Plus they have a factory shop in Silverdale if you are near Auckland?  As previously mentioned seconds are quite often just colour blemishes.

The other thing to consider is how you are going to be transporting the kayak?

Good luck

Andrew 

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  Reply # 578928 8-Feb-2012 21:02
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Just want something to paddle about on, nothing serious :) Maybe the occasional bit of dropping a handline overboard to see if anythings biting.

Transport will be via roof rack on wagon, in saying that however, Im sure I could find someone closer to the water (not that its far for me) who could store the kayak for me for a few beers/$$ :)

Anarug, yeah Im in Stanmore Bay so Silverdale is just down the road, might pop in there and have a look :)

Thanks all for your input so far :)




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  Reply # 579025 8-Feb-2012 23:54
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I use a sit on top kayak for playing around in and I race a surf ski, you need to remember that they each have their own purposes. For stooging around on, seeing the sites & doing a bit of fishing, a nice wide/deep seated kayak will do nicely, most of them are really stable so you don't really need to worry. Depending on how tall you are, you might like to have a look at one with back support. Some have a solid backrest on them and some have just a fabric one. I'm always paddling and never just sitting there, but I can see where it might be nice to be able to sit and relax.

If it's plastic (which it will be unless you decide to get a surf ski for some reason), don't bother getting cradles for your roof racks, plastic is tough, you can just strap it down normally.

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  Reply # 579133 9-Feb-2012 09:58
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One thing I just remembered. 

If you are buying second hand then make sure you check the bottom of the Kayak for scratches and ware. A lot of damage can be done if the person using it beaches it to hard or it is pulled along the sand with a person still sitting on it.






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  Reply # 579170 9-Feb-2012 11:09
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I have an "Escape" manufactured by Q-Kayaks.  It is nothing special really, picked it up off TradeMe for $300.  Others have already mentioned most of the key points, but I just want to emphasise about the seat:

-  It's not only for resting and gazing around, but also to provide support while paddling.

Our local Burnsco marine shop has some knowledgeable guys that are keen on Kayaking, and one of them recommended the Viking seat as being the most comfortable he had tried.  It wraps right around and does provide really good support.

Make sure the kayak you buy has at least 2 anchor points on each side of the seat, and another luggage strap or set of anchor points behind.  Then you will be able to anchor the seat in a variety of positions, and adjust its straps for best comfort.

A sit-in kayak provides even better back support, but they are a real mission to get in and out of, especially if you capsize!  I would opt for a sit-on-top unless you are really serious about going long distances, rather than just fooling around.





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  Reply # 579457 9-Feb-2012 20:49
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 Another thing to look for is the keel. A friend had 1 with a rounded keel and found it very difficult to keep straight. Ended up putting fins on it and even then didn't help much

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  Reply # 579706 10-Feb-2012 13:03
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I've gotr a FeelFree Nomad. Bought it for a few features - one being the wheel in the keel which makes it real easy to drag from the car to the water. Just had it up in Golden Bay and great fun paddling around the islands and muscles farms. Its got a few bits that you can tie things onto - so the bait board and knife could get tied on incase I tipped over. Could also tie a rope from the kayak to a bouy to hold me steady on the mussle farm. Also got space in the hull (for the phone in a plastic bag and a bit of kai) and on top  to stow the rod and a few beers. Being able to stow the paddle is a good idea - its a bit tricky hauling in the fish when you're bobbing around and the paddle is trying to kick free. Good fun also in the swell and breaking chop. But these things aren't something to get caught in a wind. its two strokes forward and one back . If you're not careful you'll be blown miles or not be able to paddle back to where you want to be.

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