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Topic # 116565 2-May-2013 18:48
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Original article here:
http://www.hawkesbaytoday.co.nz/news/sky-tv-blamed-for-fibre-woes/1848984/

I agree with the comments made by NOW's Marketing Manager.

I've penned some further thoughts here:.
http://www.fullflavourmedia.co.nz/blog/2013/5/2/fibre-internet-what-we-want-when-we-want-it/

I'd happily put my hand up to install a Netflix content server into every future city that we'll provide UFB services for.

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  Reply # 810408 2-May-2013 19:12
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A bigger reason for slow UFB uptake is that we suck our international bandwidth through a straw - the SCC claim excellent capacity but ISP's don't buy enough to satisfy demand even for DSL let alone UFB.

Why pay more for a better connection that's likely only to load trade me half a second faster?

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  Reply # 810421 2-May-2013 19:27
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Makes me glad that I've never given Sky TV a cent. We have UFB in our street, but I find ADSL fast enough for what we use the interweb for.




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  Reply # 810428 2-May-2013 19:42
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nitrotech: A bigger reason for slow UFB uptake is that we suck our international bandwidth through a straw - the SCC claim excellent capacity but ISP's don't buy enough to satisfy demand even for DSL let alone UFB.


Part of the solution is by bringing the content closer and this is certainly a big part of our strategy.

UFB gives ISPs the ability to have content nodes in every region.

We're going through the approval process for a cdn.net rack we'll be hosting in Tauranga.

Any our of Tauranga UFB users that load content hosted on a site that uses cdn.net will load within a couple of ms.

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  Reply # 810462 2-May-2013 20:26
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No they aren't. Ufb uptake is very slow all over the world in almost every country even ones where there is significant iptv. There are exceptions, of course, but there are plenty of countries with good online video offers that don't get fast ufb uptake.

The big myth about ufb that people keep stating is that it is needed for video streaming. That is a old of bs. 80% of the country can get 10mbps or better broadband which is plenty for HD video streaming. Plenty. I use netflix all the time and it works fine on adsl.

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  Reply # 810463 2-May-2013 20:30
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Also, lots of false info in that article about content rights such as

"A Netflix account costs US$9.99 ($11.70) per month and you can have access to 'anything that has been released in the US." Netflix had more US subscribers than the main cable and satellite network HBO.


What a load of tosh. Firstly, it's $8 us, not $9.99. Secondly, you don't get access to 'anything released in the USA.' The content on netflix is almost all older stuff. They don't have the current season of anything except their own content, of which there isn't very much, and they don't have ANY hbo , or stars stuff, 2 of the top USA content producers.

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  Reply # 810470 2-May-2013 20:52
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nitrotech: A bigger reason for slow UFB uptake is that we suck our international bandwidth through a straw - the SCC claim excellent capacity but ISP's don't buy enough to satisfy demand even for DSL let alone UFB.

Why pay more for a better connection that's likely only to load trade me half a second faster?


Well I have a 70Mbps connection at home, and 90Mbps at the office (Different ISPs and different technology), I can saturate both pretty much 24/7 connecting to servers outside NZ (US) easily. Not all ISP's have issues with enough bandwidth. 

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  Reply # 810608 3-May-2013 07:51
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networkn: Well I have a 70Mbps connection at home, and 90Mbps at the office (Different ISPs and different technology), I can saturate both pretty much 24/7 connecting to servers outside NZ (US) easily. Not all ISP's have issues with enough bandwidth. 


You must have very sore wrists ;)




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  Reply # 810610 3-May-2013 08:00
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nitrotech: A bigger reason for slow UFB uptake is that we suck our international bandwidth through a straw - the SCC claim excellent capacity but ISP's don't buy enough to satisfy demand even for DSL let alone UFB.

Why pay more for a better connection that's likely only to load trade me half a second faster?


Just because some ISP's may adopt this model doesn't mean every ISP is like this.

At the end of the day price typically does determine quality, and those who want a cheap flat rate plan stand a good chance of seeing a lesser quality experience.

FTTN has already delivered NZ some of the best last mile performance in the world, and in some ways this may hinder UFB takeup. With over 80% of premises already capable of seeing 10+ Mbps connections via ADSL2+ and ~45% of premises having access to VDSL2 it may be a hard sell to convince many of these people that there is a need for fibre at this point because they're happy with their current connection. Many people are like sheep and also don't like change.






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  Reply # 810614 3-May-2013 08:15
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sbiddle: With over 80% of premises already capable of seeing 10+ Mbps connections via ADSL2+ and ~45% of premises having access to VDSL2 it may be a hard sell to convince many of these people that there is a need for fibre at this point because they're happy with their current connection. Many people are like sheep and also don't like change.


Except when IPTV eventually gets the door open and the existing ADSL/VDSL network buckles...

An extreme theory example: Auckland-based ISP that uses Chorus backhaul to get Invercargill traffic back to Auckland.

10000 households in Southland watching HD Netflix @ 5 megabit each.... That's 50 gigabit.

Back-hauling that to Auckland is going to be very expensive, and I'd pick the ISP would have no interest implementing additional regional handover PoPs just for ADSL.

Whereas regional handover is a big part of the UFB topology.

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  Reply # 810616 3-May-2013 08:21
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myfullflavour:
An extreme theory example: Auckland-based ISP that uses Chorus backhaul to get Invercargill traffic back to Auckland.

10000 households in Southland watching HD Netflix @ 5 megabit each.... That's 50 gigabit.

Back-hauling that to Auckland is going to be very expensive, and I'd pick the ISP would have no interest implementing additional regional handover PoPs just for ADSL.

Whereas regional handover is a big part of the UFB topology.


While I agree with your point there is simply no way an ISP even with 1000 users in Southland would rely on Chorus tails to get data to Auckland - the costs of doing so would make a pop and 3rd party backhaul far more attractive.




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  Reply # 810618 3-May-2013 08:46
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I want ufb I can't get ufb so maybe they put it in the w rong places

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