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Topic # 127417 9-Aug-2013 12:31
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Dear all,

I have like many waiting for the start of the next generation of high speed broadband. When chorus maps first came out I was disappointed to see that fibre coverage stops about 300 m away from my house but this was tempered a little by noting my exchange had been converted to vsdl2 the year previously so I thought it wouldn't be long before vsdl2 service would be available.

Finally telecom started their offer so I put in my address and was (again) disappointed to see that my house can't be connected. So I started putting in addresses around mine to see what the actual coverage was and I was shocked to find the chorus maps include areas 200m further away than my house from the exchange and 150m closer to exchange also weren't covered. So the area arround my house that can actually get vdsl is much smaller than the chorus maps suggest. ( for many reasons obviously)

I'm curious as to whether there are any _actual_ coverage maps in existence rather than relying on each of us entering addresses one by one.

Would it be theoretically possible for someone with the relevant programming skills to create actual telecom (or snap or Orion) coverage maps.

A.

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  Reply # 874522 9-Aug-2013 12:35
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The Chorus maps don't require you to enter addresses; just turn on "broadband" from the Layers menu (and you might want to turn the UFB options off to make it clearer) and zoom into the appropriate place. Or did I misunderstand your question?

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  Reply # 874531 9-Aug-2013 12:38
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I suspect the chorus maps simply do a "If this cabinet is VDSL-capable, show it's whole connection zone as VDSL-enabled", so even if for example your cable run is too far for VDSL, if your cabinet is VDSL capable you'd show in the coverage zone.




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  Reply # 874532 9-Aug-2013 12:40
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Go to www.chorus.co.nz/maps

Click on the "Layers" tab on the map (next to the Map/Satellite tabs at top right).

Deselect the default "UFB" layer and select the broadband Layer on the list.  As per the legend you should then see various coloured coverage zones that equate to ADSL1 (>1 M), ADSL2+ (>10M) & VDSL (>20M) service areas.

Type in your address and the map will focus on your property, but you will see how close (or far away) you are if you are not in a particular service coverage area.






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  Reply # 874534 9-Aug-2013 12:48
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Also keep in mind the cable path is not always a direct root from exchange; it could go up one side of the road and back the other before it gets to you.
I'm actually 500-600 metres further from my exchange than the direct by road path.




Chorus has spent $1.4 billion on making their xDSL broadband network faster. If your still stuck on ADSL or VDSL, why not spend from $150 on a master filter install to make sure you are getting the most out of your connection?
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  Reply # 874659 9-Aug-2013 16:21
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"The experience you get is subject to some factors which is worth bearing in mind. This includes distance from the exchange or cabinet, home wiring, age of your computer, operating system, your modem and broadband plan."

Of course distance means the actual length of the cable from the cabinet to your house.




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  Reply # 874685 9-Aug-2013 16:51
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I've been to the chorus website and its says everyone on my street and next street over are all in coverage areas but when you goto the telecom or snap or Orconwebsites and enter actual house numbers, no service is available for those houses.

I suppose I'm after a chorus type map but using data from the actual service providers to reflect the services that can be provided.

A.

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  Reply # 874963 10-Aug-2013 09:14
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Inphinity: I suspect the chorus maps simply do a "If this cabinet is VDSL-capable, show it's whole connection zone as VDSL-enabled", so even if for example your cable run is too far for VDSL, if your cabinet is VDSL capable you'd show in the coverage zone.


Incorrect.


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  Reply # 874964 10-Aug-2013 09:15
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afe66: I've been to the chorus website and its says everyone on my street and next street over are all in coverage areas but when you goto the telecom or snap or Orconwebsites and enter actual house numbers, no service is available for those houses.

I suppose I'm after a chorus type map but using data from the actual service providers to reflect the services that can be provided.

A.


Just because ducting has been completed in an area doesn't mean that one or more ISP's yet offer service in that area.. for quite a number of reasons.



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  Reply # 875006 10-Aug-2013 10:59
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I realise there are a number of reasons why a specific house in an area can't get a particular service.

My request is just that the information I am interested in is displayed in a different format.

Telecom for example must have a database of houses which can be supplied which they poll when I enter my house details on their website. Wouldn't it be more useful to show this database data on a map directly perhaps on the telecom website?

The cynic in me wonders if this would just show how the actual coverage is less than the limited areas indicated on chorus.

Thanks.

A.

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  Reply # 875013 10-Aug-2013 11:07
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afe66:Telecom for example must have a database of houses which can be supplied which they poll when I enter my house details on their website. Wouldn't it be more useful to show this database data on a map directly perhaps on the telecom website?


I'd suggest it's useful to only a small minority of Telecom's customers. The vast majority simply want to know what service(s) are available from Telecom at their address, which is exactly what the current system does. The costs associated with building a mapping system to display the data probably far exceeds the return.

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