Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


3215 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 620

Trusted

Topic # 13164 25-Apr-2007 11:51
Send private message

The NZ Herald is reporting that there is growing concerns in NZ over the use of wifi in NZ (like in britian) over the use of wireless networks in schools to deliver broadband and network resources to the students

See link http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/story.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=10435649

I ask if a school were to say 'right, no more wifi' and they switch off their access points, would that not do anything to help.
Wouldnt there still be the same or increasing amounts of students and teachers in the classrooms / school grounds who are using laptops? I would expect that all of these laptops have the wifi turned on by default and most people wouldnt know how to turn it off. If so then wouldnt there be much the same amount of these so called radio waves of concern in the air?

I remember in high school before wifi was introduced that probably 100 students used laptops and we, one day found out we could network with each other in different classrooms of the same building when a couple of us came close enough together.
Even before then many had the wifi on by default not knowing it, and the lack of access points didnt stop us from using the laptops at school.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
Nate wants an iphone
3901 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 28

Mod Emeritus
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 68420 25-Apr-2007 12:54
Send private message

Ah yes... lets ban microwaves, tv, radio, cellphones, tv broadcasts, radio broadcasts, sharp objects, education and anything under the sun - better safe than sorry




webhosting |New Zealand connectionsgeekzone IRC chat
Loose lips may sink ships - Be smart - Don't post internal/commercially sensitive or confidential information!


6274 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 283

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 68436 25-Apr-2007 14:14
Send private message

I would be surprised if once looked into there was any issues to be found.

Compared to a cell phone, you do not place most Wifi devices right up to your body or head. Secondly the Tx power of a typical Wifi client is around 10-15dBm, compared to 30-34dBm of a Cellphone. AP's often have 20-23dBm output power, however you normallly dont sit within 10meters of them.

The only real negative is that 2.4GHz is an optimum obsorption frequency for tissue (hence the use in ovens).

Cyril

836 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 68438 25-Apr-2007 14:24
Send private message

Optimum absorption frequency for water.



6274 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 283

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 68447 25-Apr-2007 16:06
Send private message

Correct, water it is, and tissue has a very high component of this stuff.

Cyril

131 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 68448 25-Apr-2007 16:54
Send private message

Actually at 2.4 GHz water absorbs microwaves relatively poorly. The heating in a microwave oven is "diaelectric heating" - due to the movement of polar molecules, like good old H2O, induced by the magnetron.

In fact radio transmittions at 2.4 GHz are considered less risk to living tissue, due to their poor absorption, than the same tranmitted power at a lower frequency. (Ref: AS/NZS 2772.1)

When you factor in that the the RF power reaching you also drops off with the square of distance, vou can see that in the overall scheme of things, a WLAN AP represents a very, very small risk.

278 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 7

Trusted

  Reply # 68449 25-Apr-2007 17:06
Send private message

They could be on to something, let's ban kids from Starbucks and everywhere else that has a wifi access point... just not sure where they would be allowed to go.





aw

273 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 7

Subscriber

  Reply # 68457 25-Apr-2007 18:37
Send private message

... not to mention the 2.4GHz cordless phone at home.

BDFL - Memuneh
61018 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 11850

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

Reply # 68458 25-Apr-2007 18:41
Send private message

Le me check:

x Bluetooth headset
x Bluetooth stereo headset
x Bluetooth laptop
x Bluetooth mobile phone
x WiFi laptop
x WiFi accesspoint
x 2.4GHz cordless phone
x Microwave oven

Oh my! I am burning here!





836 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 68461 25-Apr-2007 19:37
Send private message

The signal is attenuated greater than it would be in free space propogation, sounds like absorbation to me. The energy transfer method itself is irrelevant.

21291 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4296

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 68475 25-Apr-2007 22:23
Send private message

I was told that 2.4Ghz was simply chosen as its a trade off for physical size of the magnetron and power and frequency that it produces.

Its also the reason that to get past about 800 watts a microwave oven has to have dual magnetron's in it.




Richard rich.ms

460 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  Reply # 69549 4-May-2007 20:49
Send private message

This is the kind of thing that gets on my nerves.

There's no conclusive evidence that WIFI causes cancer or damage to people. Yet already, there is political parties and other interest groups pushing for a ban.

It's an example of how people still have irrational fears of things they don't understand. Sure I'm not going to put my head in a microwave any time soon but I'm more than happy to live near a cellphone tower.

I actually got clued onto this type of 'radiation' fear a while back. When I was young I had my computer taken from me and put into the 'louge' to be a 'family computer'. I was told that it was because of the ratiation being emitted from all the devices in my room.

Now I got two computers, many small transformer boxes for charging phones etc, three wifi enabled devices, bluetooth and I'm not developing tumours.

Have any of you guys seen that episode of Penn & Teller where they debunk myths around radiation & stuff? I can't remember which one it was but they showed some doofus going around with a thing that measures magnetic fields and was scaring people by showing how much energy is around a microwave or light bulb or whatever.

About the worst thing I've ever had from an electro-magnetic field was when the power cables were too close to my phone cable & it screwed up my dial-up connection.

6274 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 283

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 69571 5-May-2007 08:38
Send private message

Just looking at your avatar, I suspect this non ionising radiation treatment has taken its toll  :)

Cyril

460 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  Reply # 69611 5-May-2007 15:56
Send private message

Tongue out pwned.

223 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 69631 5-May-2007 18:36
Send private message

At my school, they just announced that they were looking into letting students access the schools WLAN using their own laptops. I hope that this doesn't put them off.




Can't beat the burble of that American V8. Ohh yea!

6274 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 283

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 69639 5-May-2007 19:23
Send private message

I do hope they are out of the sun whilst using there laptops via the wireless lan, we would not want the mega rads of radiation from the big yellow thing in the sky from overpowering their wifi phy interfaces.

Maybe if we plastered sun screen on our laptops things might be better. I feel better already for thinking positive things,



YEAH RIGHT

Cyril

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Intel introduces new NUC kits and NUC mini PCs
Posted 16-Aug-2018 11:03


The Warehouse leaps into the AI future with Google
Posted 15-Aug-2018 17:56


Targus set sights on enterprise and consumer growth in New Zealand
Posted 13-Aug-2018 13:47


Huawei to distribute nova 3i in New Zealand
Posted 9-Aug-2018 16:23


Home robot Vector to be available in New Zealand stores
Posted 9-Aug-2018 14:47


Panasonic announces new 2018 OLED TV line up
Posted 7-Aug-2018 16:38


Kordia completes first live 4K TV broadcast
Posted 1-Aug-2018 13:00


Schools get safer and smarter internet with Managed Network Upgrade
Posted 30-Jul-2018 20:01


DNC wants a safer .nz in the coming year
Posted 26-Jul-2018 16:08


Auldhouse becomes an AWS Authorised Training Delivery Partner in New Zealand
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:55


Rakuten Kobo launches Kobo Clara HD entry level reader
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:44


Kiwi team reaches semi-finals at the Microsoft Imagine Cup
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:38


KidsCan App to Help Kiwi Children in Need
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:32


FUJIFILM announces new high-performance lenses
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:57


New FUJIFILM XF10 introduces square mode for Instagram sharing
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:44



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.