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# 173877 9-Jun-2015 13:17
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Just received:


Land access changes to streamline UFB rollout

Communications Minister Amy Adams has today released a raft of proposals to help speed up the installation of Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB).

The Land Access for Telecommunications discussion document seeks feedback on ideas to reduce unnecessary costs and delays with the UFB rollout.

“As one of the most ambitious infrastructure projects New Zealand has ever undertaken, the UFB programme is not a small and incremental upgrade to an existing network but rather a complete rollout of a new and innovative technology into our homes, businesses and schools,” Ms Adams says.

“With demand for UFB taking off and the number of network connections now exceeding expectations, we’re gaining a better understanding of the nature and scale of some of the challenges that can be encountered with a programme this ambitious.

“There have been frustrating delays faced by some customers and industry in installing broadband cables up shared driveways and in apartment complexes due to disputes and permission requirements. There are also unnecessary costs being placed on the build through the inefficient use of existing infrastructure.

“While the industry has a role in streamlining the way they process UFB applications, the Government is ensuring the regulations are fit for purpose.”

Current regulations mean that in some cases efforts to deploy fibre could add over double the cost and cause delays of more than a year in order to secure agreement from various individual land owners and purchases easements for every property passed.

“New Zealanders are crying out for ultra-fast broadband because they recognise it’s a huge opportunity for improved connectivity. We want to give New Zealanders easy and fair access to better broadband, rather than hold up the rollout with burdensome rules and regulations,” says Ms Adams.

The discussion document outlines four proposals for change:
· amending the way in which network operators seek permission to access private property (in situations like shared driveways and apartment buildings)
· enabling better use of existing utility infrastructure to more efficiently roll out fibre networks
· providing more certainty to network operators regarding their ability to maintain fibre infrastructure installed on private property
· establishing an expanded and accessible disputes resolution process to ensure that land access disputes can be resolved quickly and fairly.

Submissions close at 5pm on 24 July 2015

The Land Access for Telecommunications discussion document can be found at: http://www.med.govt.nz/sectors-industries/technology-communication/communications/broadband-policy/telecommunications-infrastructure-deployment/land-access-for-telecommunications-consultation.


And from Spark New Zealand:


Spark New Zealand welcomes proposed UFB consenting changes

The process for getting connected to Ultrafast Fibre Broadband (UFB) network will become a lot less painful if recommendations to speed up the consenting process for installs are enacted.

“This is a difficult technical issue and Minister Adams should be congratulated for helping to get fibre uptake moving,” says Spark New Zealand General Manager Product and Service Delivery Lindsay Cowley.

“Spark New Zealand is fully supportive of the Government’s UFB programme and any moves to help speed up and simplify the processes for connecting our customers to the fibre network.

“The proposed changes would make it easier for thousands of New Zealanders to easily connect to ultra-fast fibre broadband. Our analysis shows that approximately 1-in-8 customers has to go through a consent process to connect to fibre and many simply give up when the hassle becomes too much.”

Spark launched its range of Ultra Fibre products in March 2013 and is the only provider offering fibre products on a nationwide basis. Spark is also the largest provider of fibre connections and has been working with Chorus and the other Local Fibre Companies to make it as easy as possible to connect to the network.

“We are concerned that connections are taking too long, costs can escalate and drop-off rates can double when a customer has to go through the consenting process. The move toward allowing a more permissive consenting regime in cases of right-of-ways and multi-unit-dwellings is a pragmatic solution to this problem.

“Unfortunately we’re currently faced with instances where people want to sign up for fibre, but can’t do so because of problems getting what should be relatively straight-forward agreements to install the cable. Given the enormous task of building the new fibre network and getting people to move on from their copper connection, the consent process for connecting should really be as easy as possible.

“Spark New Zealand is investing in the kind of things that get people to fibre, such as Lightbox internet TV, the ability to deliver HD, cloud computing for business and smart living solutions. Fibre is extremely important to our country’s future. That’s why it should be as easy as possible for our customers to connect,” says Mr Cowley.




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Banana?
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  # 1320288 9-Jun-2015 13:28
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Can't happen quick enough IMO, and good on them for realizing it and starting the ball rolling.

It sucks that your neighbor(s) in a shared driveway situation, and your Body Corp in an MDU can stop you getting access to UFB. It needs to be classed as essential telecoms (as copper is).

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  # 1320318 9-Jun-2015 14:16
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I've read over it, but this will not help MDUs in any way.
Parties who object will still hold things up, this only helps the cases of parties being slow to respond are assumed to be consenting which is still very useful.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1320343 9-Jun-2015 14:52
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Publius: I've read over it, but this will not help MDUs in any way.
Parties who object will still hold things up, this only helps the cases of parties being slow to respond are assumed to be consenting which is still very useful.


You realize your first and second sentence contradict each other right?

This means it will require an actual effort from a neighbor in a ROW situation to stand in the way. Where previously it required an effort to give consent.

I have a great deal of faith in the laziness of people.




Please note: I have a professional bias towards Vodafone.

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  # 1320365 9-Jun-2015 15:19
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I think this is a good idea because no one should be denied access to the UFB network because a neighbor objects to the cable being laid.Any law amendments passed should be written in a way that if a person who requests UFB and who's house is on a right of way any neighbors are NOT allowed to object to the laying and maintenance/repair of the Fibre Optic cable if it needs to cross the objecting party's property.


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  # 1320398 9-Jun-2015 15:55
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Jaxar:
Publius: I've read over it, but this will not help MDUs in any way.
Parties who object will still hold things up, this only helps the cases of parties being slow to respond are assumed to be consenting which is still very useful.


You realize your first and second sentence contradict each other right?

This means it will require an actual effort from a neighbor in a ROW situation to stand in the way. Where previously it required an effort to give consent.

I have a great deal of faith in the laziness of people.


It stops the lazy neighbour problem being a problem. (cross-leased ROW)

But MDU problem is some are actively objecting not lazy, which this doesn't help with. Some have valid reasons for objecting, like they have a standard they want met and don't see why they should pay to meet it.

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  # 1320404 9-Jun-2015 16:04
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I have a great deal of faith in the laziness of people.



Well said! I'd encourage everyone on GZ with an interest in this to head online and make a submission. It is only by using your voice that change may come about. If all those with a voice remain silent this will have less chance of becoming reality.

Personally I am very much for the proposal that proactive action should be required to refuse consent. It will certainly make the job of the LFCs as well as the RSPs much easier.

It is very frustrating to spend a portion of your day in the same conversation:
RSP: "I'm sorry, one of the affected neighbours has either not responded, or has said no, so we cannot connect you to fibre".
Customer: "Which one of my neighbours said no?"
RSP: "We don't know".
Customer: "What do you mean you don't know. You must know who refused?"
RSP: "No sorry, the consent process is confidential between the property owners and the LFC. The retailer is not told who said no".
Customer: "That's ridiculous. Who can I speak to about this?"
RSP: "Well... apart from door-knocking your neighbours, no-one really".
Customer: "What is the LFC's phone number? I will call them".
RSP: "There is no number you can call to speak to them, they will only deal with the RSP".
Customer: "This is absurd. Bugger your company, I will try another RSP".
RSP: "You can try but unless the party who refused suddenly changes their mind, the result will be the same".

And the cycle continues....... Bring on the changes I say!!

Submissions and the discussion document can be viewed Here




The views expressed by me are not necessarily those of my employer Chorus NZ Ltd


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  # 1320413 9-Jun-2015 16:17
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Wheelbarrow01:
I have a great deal of faith in the laziness of people.



Well said! I'd encourage everyone on GZ with an interest in this to head online and make a submission. It is only by using your voice that change may come about. If all those with a voice remain silent this will have less chance of becoming reality.

Personally I am very much for the proposal that proactive action should be required to refuse consent. It will certainly make the job of the LFCs as well as the RSPs much easier.

It is very frustrating to spend a portion of your day in the same conversation:
RSP: "I'm sorry, one of the affected neighbours has either not responded, or has said no, so we cannot connect you to fibre".
Customer: "Which one of my neighbours said no?"
RSP: "We don't know".
Customer: "What do you mean you don't know. You must know who refused?"
RSP: "No sorry, the consent process is confidential between the property owners and the LFC. The retailer is not told who said no".
Customer: "That's ridiculous. Who can I speak to about this?"
RSP: "Well... apart from door-knocking your neighbours, no-one really".
Customer: "What is the LFC's phone number? I will call them".
RSP: "There is no number you can call to speak to them, they will only deal with the RSP".
Customer: "This is absurd. Bugger your company, I will try another RSP".
RSP: "You can try but unless the party who refused suddenly changes their mind, the result will be the same".

And the cycle continues....... Bring on the changes I say!!

Submissions and the discussion document can be viewed Here


That's an awfully familiar conversation.

I'm not sure I'm ready to go as far as to say the owner of the land in an MDU should be forced to accept a fibre install to his building because his tenant requested it as some have suggested. A ROW is different though.




Please note: I have a professional bias towards Vodafone.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1320473 9-Jun-2015 17:20
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Jaxar:
Wheelbarrow01:
I have a great deal of faith in the laziness of people.



Well said! I'd encourage everyone on GZ with an interest in this to head online and make a submission. It is only by using your voice that change may come about. If all those with a voice remain silent this will have less chance of becoming reality.

Personally I am very much for the proposal that proactive action should be required to refuse consent. It will certainly make the job of the LFCs as well as the RSPs much easier.

It is very frustrating to spend a portion of your day in the same conversation:
RSP: "I'm sorry, one of the affected neighbours has either not responded, or has said no, so we cannot connect you to fibre".
Customer: "Which one of my neighbours said no?"
RSP: "We don't know".
Customer: "What do you mean you don't know. You must know who refused?"
RSP: "No sorry, the consent process is confidential between the property owners and the LFC. The retailer is not told who said no".
Customer: "That's ridiculous. Who can I speak to about this?"
RSP: "Well... apart from door-knocking your neighbours, no-one really".
Customer: "What is the LFC's phone number? I will call them".
RSP: "There is no number you can call to speak to them, they will only deal with the RSP".
Customer: "This is absurd. Bugger your company, I will try another RSP".
RSP: "You can try but unless the party who refused suddenly changes their mind, the result will be the same".

And the cycle continues....... Bring on the changes I say!!

Submissions and the discussion document can be viewed Here


That's an awfully familiar conversation.

I'm not sure I'm ready to go as far as to say the owner of the land in an MDU should be forced to accept a fibre install to his building because his tenant requested it as some have suggested. A ROW is different though.


I agree, although i'm told Westfield used to actively deny UFB installs to shops in their malls as they had a provider they were working with (and profiting from no doubt)  to resell fast internet at exorbitant rates, so maybe heavy-handed wouldn't always be a bad thing.

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  # 1320511 9-Jun-2015 18:21
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Should move to a notice and objection type system.

Person down shared driveway or in MDU says they want broadband
LFC notifies relevant properties, saying unless you have a really good objection, we're doing it.





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  # 1320566 9-Jun-2015 19:35
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This will be great news if it goes through. I'm currently tied up with a ROW situation where the neighboring property owner has moved back to China and isn't responding to the emails from their property managers. It's been 7 months already.

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  # 1320579 9-Jun-2015 20:00
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See if you can get their email address and send them an email that the place has burned down, see if they answer that email or not.

IMO this level of absenteeism is a problem in every way.




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  # 1320678 9-Jun-2015 21:18
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We just bought a property which is the front house in a shared driveway situation with 3 other properties, UFB is not yet available but will be in 2016.

I do hope this goes through nice and quickly as although I'm not expecting any resistance I am likely to become their worst nightmare if they try anything to stop me from being connected.




Perpetually undecided.

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  # 1320940 10-Jun-2015 10:07
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Not having to sign a paper to say yes is much safer.

If you have a neighbour that is a problem, signing a piece of paper that they give you under the guise of needing it for a consent is like opening the door to your house to them. Once they have your signature and have raided your letterbox for your bank statements etc. what will you be signed up for next?

Gotta protect yourself these days.

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  # 1470222 13-Jan-2016 18:33
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I've been having an issue with a neighbour not signing a consent form for over two years. I fear I'm going to miss the free install period if something isn't passed soon (although I have no idea when the free period ceases).

Does anyone know if we are any closer with this proposed legislation from Ms Adams?
It just has to be fully supported by the opposition party too, to give it full credibility.
Plus, whatever is passed must not be contestable otherwise land owners will stretch things out even further.

And - has anyone found a 'workaround' in the meantime? Success stories maybe?

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  # 1470237 13-Jan-2016 18:38
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I think the telcos should just refuse service to anyone that will not sign a consent? That would get them moving I would think.




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