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Master Geek
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Topic # 220351 7-Aug-2017 11:19
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Hello everyone,

 

I am currently studying down the road of Networking and one of our papers is focused on WAN technologies. We have been tasked to research what is available from offer from New Zealand Telecommunications companies and the costs if known.

 

Since I lurk this forum everyday I knew this would be the best place to ask.

 

The technologies we are covering are (some oldies as well):

 

Frame Relay
ISDN
X.25
Leased Line
ATM
SONET
DSL
Cable
Dial-up
LTE
WiMAX

 


If an ISP or someone that has carried out contracts regarding setting up and installing these technologies can answer these questions, it would be greatly appreciated by my team. This information will be combined with our research and we hope to come out with the most accurate information.

 

If you know anyone in the industry personally on Geekzone and can @ mention them I would appreciate it.

 

Please private message me the filled in template if any information is sensitive, this information will only be shared with our class.

 

I have created a copy and paste template.

 

 

 


Service provider name:

 

Technologies available: Frame Relay, ISDN, X.25, Leased Line, ATM, SONET, DSL, Cable, Dial-up, LTE, WiMAX

 

Prices(If known, base price for single connection / price per Kilometre / bandwith costs)

 

Frame Relay: $
ISDN: $
X.25: $
Leased Line: $
ATM: $
SONET: $
DSL: $
Cable: $
Dial-up: $
LTE: $
WiMAX: $

 

Please delete any value that does not apply from the above information.
Thank you for your time.

 

Matt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Geek
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  Reply # 1840503 7-Aug-2017 11:58
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Some of those technologies are no longer available so there will be no pricing but someone might know the legacy price if they ever had the service.

 

 

 

Playing devils advocate on the rest of the question, In regards to other prices, companies get charged differently depending on other services they have so might get better pricing than someone else who is only after 1 server sp there will be variations of pricing.

 

Also for base pricing it will be commercially sensitive so even though you said it will not go outside of the classroom, there is no guarantee someone wont leak it.

 

 

 

Cheers


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  Reply # 1840522 7-Aug-2017 12:44
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Is it really relevant to have these VERY legacy technologies inside a paper to learn about? Perhaps to provide historical reference but to teach you about market operations of them?






 
 
 
 


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Biddle Corp
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  Reply # 1840566 7-Aug-2017 13:45
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It seems very strange to be discussing (other than a brief understanding of what they are and how they operate) legacy technologies that are a) no longer available and b) the pricing isn't really relevant in any way as you're not really comparing apples with apples, or really even apples with another fruit.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1840573 7-Aug-2017 14:02
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In reality there is the following:

 

Fixed cheap / end user / small business options:

 

$ - xDSL (ADSL/VDSL/SHDSL) - Up to 24MBit (ADSL) / 100Mbit (VDSL) depending on distance

 

$ (Thanks to government funding) - UFB (GPON shared fibre) - Up to 1GB up to 10KM away from Exchange

 

$ - Vodafone Cable - Only available in WLG/CHC as mostly a residential service. But is being over-built by UFB so I wouldn't recommend it any more unless UFB & VDSL wasn't available.

 

Fixed expensive corporate options:

 

$$$ - Carrier Ethernet (Layer 2/3 Fibre that either provides a VLAN or routed network depending on requirements and budget). 1/10/100GB plus a CIR/PIR on the access. Available country wide from Spark and other wholesalers. It's typically used to provide nationwide backhaul and to aggregate multiple connections for ISPs. Such as if you want to provide UFB in Dunedin but don't have any hardware there then Carrier Ethernet is used to transport that as a L2/3 service up to Auckland. As a CIR and PIR rates so often you get a 1GB service that has a CIR of 100Mbit, and burst up to 500Mbit or however much you want to pay for. Spark put a edge Carrier Ethernet node on site with a number of ethernet ports similar to an ONT but they typically have a 1 or 10GB uplink so can offer higher and committed speeds over UFB. Expensive install costs (5-10k+)

 

$$$$$ - OTN (Layer 1 Fibre service or if you want to do something special over the fibre instead of ethernet like Fibre Channel SANs). Similar to above but all CIR as you have dedicated fibre. Also available country wide and is the replacement for DWDM circuits. It's optically split and then muxed so you pay for a certain amount of wavelength. More expensive than Carrier Ethernet as it needs to be meshed into the optical network.

 

$$ to $$$$$ - DFAS (Dark Fibre Access Service aka point to point fibre sold by Chorus) as fast as you want to go up to 10km/40km away. Standard Optical Fibre has a 10KM or 40KM distance limit without muxing it. So DFAS is more commonly used by Chorus or Citylink in Wellington or Vector in Auckland to provide Metro fibre.

 

Mobile / Radio:

 

Mobile Data (3G/4G) up to 150Mbit or so

 

WiMAX - Depends but faster than ADSL

 

Point to Point wifi - 200Mbit+ depending on the gear you purchase.

 

Microwave - Number of good microwave solutions these days offer up to 1GB for gear that costs less than $2-3k to deploy

 

 

 

Internet Services:

 

Just because you have nationwide backhaul doesn't mean you can talk out to the internet. Typically you then need an agreement with Global Gateway (Spark) / Vodafone / Vocus or other wholesale internet providers. That would typically provide a DFAS with a CIR/PIR based on your budget and then you would put your BNG (Broadband Network Gateway) which does all the routing / subscriber management between the national fibre described above and the internet.

 

 

 

Everything is pretty much ethernet now. If you need something special or a WAN you get Carrier Ethernet / OTN. Otherwise UFB if available or xDSL / Mobile services if UFB isn't and then use VPN services over the top of internet connection. And if you're a carrier then you would run core routing protocols such as MPLS and then BGP to have virtual Layer 2 / 3 networks running over your shared core infrastructure. Then the IP routing for the internet sits ontop of that.

 

Edit: Updated to include more detail.






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  Reply # 1840596 7-Aug-2017 14:49
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  • Frame Relay
  • ISDN
  • X.25
  • Leased Line—I presume you mean copper, at speeds up to 2M (E1)?
  • ATM
  • SONET—In NZ that would be SDH
  • DSL—ADSL, ADSLv2, VDSL, VDSL2, G.FAST... which?
  • Cable—I presume you mean HFC DOCSIS?
  • Dial-up
  • LTE
  • WiMAX

 

 

Conspicuous by their absence

 

  • 2G and 3G. Most machine to machine is currently 2G/3G rather than 4G/LTE
  • WiFi. Historically, SSR (Spread Spectrum Radio) was offered by some operators. Nowadays, WiFI—you know you're soaking in it.
  • Microwave
  • Satellite

 

 

And then...

 

  • UFB. Fibre, multiple types (Bitstream 2,3,4 and DFAS)
  • Other direct fibre connections from many companies



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  Reply # 1840597 7-Aug-2017 14:51
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Thank you for the replies.

 

I also find it strange that we are asked to research if providers offer legacy services, and I knew pricing was a long shot as I know these are POA. We have the information from what we have found on certain ISP's business sections of their websites and any information I can gather from people inside of the industry will be a bonus.

 

Thanks again.


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  Reply # 1840600 7-Aug-2017 14:58
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Dolts:

 

Thank you for the replies.

 

I also find it strange that we are asked to research if providers offer legacy services, and I knew pricing was a long shot as I know these are POA. We have the information from what we have found on certain ISP's business sections of their websites and any information I can gather from people inside of the industry will be a bonus.

 

Thanks again.

 

 

Based on the technologies asked for, and in particular SONET, it appears like a North American survey that's been repurposed to NZ. I'm assuming it has been repurposed?

 

 

 

May I ask what the purpose of the paper is? Is it to teach you about networking in general, or is someone trying to learn stuff about the NZ network scene?




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  Reply # 1840626 7-Aug-2017 15:35
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I'll post the learning outcomes to give more context.

 

     

  1. Understand, configure and troubleshoot different WAN technologies.
  2. Understand, configure and troubleshoot virtual private networks (VPNs) and tunneling.
  3. Monitor and troubleshoot network operations using syslog, SNMP, NTP and flow collection protocols.
  4. Design network architectures, including borderless networks, virtualisation, and collaboration technology and solutions.
  5. Understand, configure and troubleshoot static and dynamic Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) techniques.

 

The paper is Cisco orientated and the material in the first couple of weeks seems to be quite Americanized and a history lesson.

 

I listed all of the technologies covered in the slides and thought I could get some more information from folks here and I know it would be a stretch considering the information I was after.

 

I agree with what sbiddle said and I will likely pass it on to the lecturer.

 

Cheers (Back to study!)


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  Reply # 1840650 7-Aug-2017 16:41
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Best of luck. You might ask the lecturer about the RFC1149 and related standard accesses.

 

 

 

smile

 

 




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  Reply # 1840652 7-Aug-2017 16:46
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Thanks for that, was a great read haha.


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  Reply # 1840701 7-Aug-2017 18:23
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michaeln:

Best of luck. You might ask the lecturer about the RFC1149 and related standard accesses.


 


smile


 



Don't you have some other open air transport stuff to worry about?




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  Reply # 1840739 7-Aug-2017 19:18
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michaeln:

 

Best of luck. You might ask the lecturer about the RFC1149 and related standard accesses.

 

smile

 

 

 

 

Hahahahaha that is so bloody awesome!! I especially like the bit about broadcast storms hahaha.

 

 

 

But anyway OP... I stopped reading that list when I saw 'Frame Relay'. Unless you are writing a history paper (or work for KiwiRail), don't even bother about it. Ethernet is a thing these days.

 

Definitely sounds like a very "cisco-ish" course. As BarTender pointed out.. Focus on:
- DSL
- Fibre (of all flavours - at the end of the day they the different products are just extra services added to the fibre)
- Cable (very small footprint)
- 3G/4G (providing the fill in where fixed line can't)
- maybe WiMAX to a point - but I wouldn't have thought there were many proper "WiMAX" carriers out there and these days its "WISP's" using unlicensed spectrum.
- And then there are the high-end microwave links on licensed spectrum that can deliver some pretty choice speeds.

 

 

 

The only other thing I find kind of funny is that with today's state of having fibre pretty much everywhere, and the awesome routers (and software) that are available (ie Mikrotik, EdgeRouter, etc), you can build a very functional and reliable WAN without the need for dedicated circuits all over the place.


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  Reply # 1840795 7-Aug-2017 20:51
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What course are you doing and where are you doing this course OP may I ask?






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  Reply # 1840811 7-Aug-2017 21:16
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sonyxperiageek: What course are you doing and where are you doing this course OP may I ask?

 

Sure I can answer this. 

 

Bachelor of Computing, Communications and Technology at Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology formerly Waiariki Polytechnic in Rotorua.

 

http://www.wholesale.vodafone.co.nz/data-frame-relay is one of the reasons I sought to find if service providers offered any of the technologies I mentioned.

 

I have searched for most WAN technologies with an ISP name, but why I asked here was to see if there was any information I could add as a bonus.

 

And again thank you for the replies.

 

 


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  Reply # 1840814 7-Aug-2017 21:29
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Dolts:

 

sonyxperiageek: What course are you doing and where are you doing this course OP may I ask?

 

Sure I can answer this. 

 

Bachelor of Computing, Communications and Technology at Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology formerly Waiariki Polytechnic in Rotorua.

 

http://www.wholesale.vodafone.co.nz/data-frame-relay is one of the reasons I sought to find if service providers offered any of the technologies I mentioned.

 

I have searched for most WAN technologies with an ISP name, but why I asked here was to see if there was any information I could add as a bonus.

 

And again thank you for the replies.

 

 

 

 

Wow! 1984Kbps! Why doesn't everyone get Frame Relay?!

 

Maybe a specific Chorus product you might want to look in to is "HSNS" as this is probably the modern equivalent of what Frame Relay was for businesses. Essentially no different (well not really) to standard ADSL connections but you get CIR's and better SLA's for fault resolution.


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