Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




568 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


#225844 7-Dec-2017 14:43
Send private message

Hi Team

 

 

 

I have wired up a couple of rooms for Ethernet using the ethernet packs you can buy from PB Tech Cat 6 with the ends on them

 

so I brought 1 30 meter cat 6 cable and 1 20 meter cable and I just cut the ends off and ran them in the walls then terminated them to a keystone jack Tested

 

with Lan tester all ok also getting gigabit connection speeds.

 

But... Should I have used solid core cable? the reason I didn't is I didn't want 300 odd meters of Ethernet cable (solid cable is sold by the box)

 

This is for residential non business use 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks.


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer Create new topic
2413 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1914654 7-Dec-2017 14:56
Send private message

Stranded Cables are normally used for Patch Cords as they get moved a lot
Solid Cables are normally used for Structured Cables which are not moved.

 

For your use it makes no difference but punching down stranded cable is not recommended as it can become loose very easily.

 

 

 

 


xpd

Budget Gamer
10539 posts

Uber Geek

Mod Emeritus
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1914655 7-Dec-2017 14:57
Send private message

Not necessarily, Im running twisted under the house, outside for a few meters (will be getting put into some conduit to help protect against the elements.) before heading into the garage. 





XPD^ / DemiseNZ

 

Blog         Free Games        Twitter

 

Disclaimer - It wasn't me, the dog ate my keyboard, my account was hacked, I was drunk, ALIENS.


 
 
 
 


5944 posts

Uber Geek


  #1914680 7-Dec-2017 15:35
Send private message

xpd:

 

Not necessarily, Im running twisted under the house,

 

 

Twisted is different to stranded. All cable should be twisted pairs - that's what helps with interference rejection. Stranded means the individual conductors are made up of several fine strands, rather than a solid core. Stranded is more flexible, so used for patch cables, but because the individual strands move and deform against each other, they have a tendency to come loose, or cause intermittent connections when punched into IDC type connectors.


228 posts

Master Geek


  #1914700 7-Dec-2017 15:59
Send private message

If it is working I wouldn't worry about.

 

If you do more cable runs in future PBTech do have 50M boxes of solid UTP.

 

I got a couple of these as it let me pull two cables at once. 




568 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  #1914786 7-Dec-2017 17:31
Send private message

Thanks @robcreid

 

 

 

I thought they only sold 305 meters!

 

I have pretty much over the last couple of days been learning how to make ethernet cables and make wall plates (Keystones)

 

So I have decided I will buy that one as it's actually pretty cheap and it's the amount I want and I'll just re-pull and terminate the cables it wont take me long.  and I'll just use the stranded one's I bought for something else (put the plugs back on them back on them)




568 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  #1915493 8-Dec-2017 23:08
Send private message

If Solid Core cat 6 gets a kink in it while your feeding it though the wall would that ruin the cable? or would you have to bend it back and forth it multiple times to damage the it?


5944 posts

Uber Geek


  #1915532 9-Dec-2017 07:46
Send private message

It's not very likely to break the conductors, but what it does is deform the twisted pair, so the twist and spacing is no longer uniform. The problem is that this affects the interference rejection which is required for the higher frequencies that cat6 is rated to. You'll probably find it will work with GigE, but at higher frequencies will give intermittent errors.


 
 
 
 


23301 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1915534 9-Dec-2017 07:55
Send private message

Stranded will not work properly in punchdown blocks. It may look ok initially but things move over time, it gets erratic, links fail occasionally etc.

 

Saw a whole house done with it that way, ended up crimping plugs on the end and using pass-thru keystones to make it look somewhat ok as it wasnt able to be replaced since decorating happened after they went in the walls. Worked OK on gig ethernet but the HDMI one was no good.





Richard rich.ms

614 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1915536 9-Dec-2017 08:01
Send private message

The other consideration to make is the type of terminations.
The RJ45 "mechs" in your wall plates are usually made for solid core cables.
The RJ45 plugs come in two types - for stranded or for solid. The stranded cores are pierced when crimped and the solid cores are usually straddled (like they are in the wall sockets).

The new RJ45 plugs are way easier to terminate - they have a little plastic insert which the cores are threaded through first. The old type required painstaking alignment.




Rob



568 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  #1915627 9-Dec-2017 12:08
Send private message

RunningMan:

 

It's not very likely to break the conductors, but what it does is deform the twisted pair, so the twist and spacing is no longer uniform. The problem is that this affects the interference rejection which is required for the higher frequencies that cat6 is rated to. You'll probably find it will work with GigE, but at higher frequencies will give intermittent errors.

 

 

 

 

When I was installing my Solid Core Cat 6 It kinked and it was a tight kink..when I saw it I quickly unkinked it.. 

 

Do you think my cable will be ok or is it probably damaged? 


5944 posts

Uber Geek


  #1915631 9-Dec-2017 12:15
Send private message

A tight kink will have probably caused some damage - how much is hard to say without testing it at high frequency. If you're able to redo that run it's probably not a bad idea, then re-use that cable for 2 short runs instead. It'll be harder to replace once wall linings are on etc.

 

Any damage is only likely to affect high frequencies, so it also depends what signal is going down that cable. If it's being used for HDMI, it's very sensitive to problems, up to Gig ethernet, not so problematic.




568 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  #1915633 9-Dec-2017 12:18
Send private message

It's too much effort to replace again.. it's a short run no more then 17 meters and wont be used for HDMI..  also it's being run though a wardrobe so wall linings aren't an issue.


28967 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #1915898 10-Dec-2017 09:12
Send private message

robfish: 

The new RJ45 plugs are way easier to terminate - they have a little plastic insert which the cores are threaded through first. The old type required painstaking alignment.

 

This is standard for a cat6 connector but not for a cat5 connector so it depends on what cable you're using.

 

As somebody who does a lot of wiring work I find dealing with cat5 a million times easier than cat6 both for termination to frames and crimping.

 

As for the OP - any good electrical store will let you take cable away and return the box and just pay for what you use.

 

 


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

OPPO Find X2 Lite brings flagship features to mid-range 5G smartphone
Posted 29-May-2020 12:52


Sony introduces the digital camera ZV-1 for content creators
Posted 27-May-2020 12:47


Samsung Announces 2020 QLED TV Range
Posted 20-May-2020 16:29


D-Link A/NZ launches AI-Powered body temperature measuring system
Posted 20-May-2020 16:22


NortonLifeLock Online Banking Protection now available for New Zealand banks
Posted 20-May-2020 16:14


SD Express delivers new gigabyte speeds for SD memory cards
Posted 20-May-2020 15:00


D-Link A/NZ launches Nuclias cloud managed network solution hosted in Australia
Posted 11-May-2020 17:53


Logitech introduces new video streaming solution for home studios
Posted 11-May-2020 17:48


Next generation Volvo cars to be powered by Luminar LiDAR technology
Posted 7-May-2020 13:56


D-Link A/NZ launches Wi-Fi Certified EasyMesh system
Posted 7-May-2020 13:51


Spark teams up with Microsoft to bring Xbox All Access to New Zealand
Posted 7-May-2020 13:01


Microsoft plans to establish its first datacenter region in New Zealand
Posted 6-May-2020 11:35


Genesis School-gen has joined forces with Mind Lab Kids
Posted 1-May-2020 12:53


Malwarebytes expands into privacy with fast, frictionless VPN
Posted 30-Apr-2020 16:06


Kordia to donate TV airtime on Channel 200 to community groups
Posted 30-Apr-2020 16:00



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.