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#89262 29-Aug-2011 20:50
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How close to the House does the Fibre get in FTTH?

And can I choose where in the House?

Lets assume that Chorus have sent a letter saying that Downer will be in our street installing fibre some time in the next three months (unless there's weather, in which case the dates might be different). :)

I'm assuming that they take the fibre at least the property line - do I need to pay to get it into the house, or is that part of the initial setup?

When/If I get UFB, do I get to choose where the fibre terminates? - My copper line comes into the house at a most inconvenient location for computer gear, would they let me choose the garage at the back of my house to terminate the fibre? Or my ceiling space?

How much is it likely to cost to move it later?

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  #513672 29-Aug-2011 21:26
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It's pretty difficult to move it later so best to get it done right in the first place. The garage is probably your best bet. Have you got star wiring going back to the garage though?

And yes you won't need to pay for the installation to your house AFAIK




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  #513677 29-Aug-2011 21:32
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Not much of a star, just 4 cables run from the ceiling space to one panel in the garage, but any future cabling will be going to the ceiling space.

 
 
 
 


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  #513772 30-Aug-2011 08:54
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There may be some restriction based on the distance from the property boundary with the road. I've heard stories of it being about 15m but probably depends on the fibre company. There may also be a distance limit within the house e.g. 5m 'cos they are not going to be wiring to the back of the house.

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  #513777 30-Aug-2011 09:09
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I think you will find they will land the fibre a soon as they can that lets them place ONT in a sensible location, from there its copper to where ever.

Cyril

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  #513780 30-Aug-2011 09:23
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I imagine it will be to a point in your house that's closest to the road but also makes sense.

They won't want to go all the way around your house to the garage at the back.

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  #513783 30-Aug-2011 09:34
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raindr: How close to the House does the Fibre get in FTTH?

And can I choose where in the House?

Lets assume that Chorus have sent a letter saying that Downer will be in our street installing fibre some time in the next three months (unless there's weather, in which case the dates might be different). :)

I'm assuming that they take the fibre at least the property line - do I need to pay to get it into the house, or is that part of the initial setup?

When/If I get UFB, do I get to choose where the fibre terminates? - My copper line comes into the house at a most inconvenient location for computer gear, would they let me choose the garage at the back of my house to terminate the fibre? Or my ceiling space?

How much is it likely to cost to move it later?


The default is to connect to your house as cheaply and quickly as possible. That much is common sense. Whether it's aerial or buried remains to be seen, but I would guess that if there are aerial services now then aerial fibre will come.

The spirit and principal of the project is to allow the end user  - you - to have the option of choosing where to position your lead-in, if it's inconvenient. Just like your electricity and your gas line.

And just like power - it's costs money. Specifically you as the home owner. If you want it reticulated around the back of the house, extending the total drop by 130m - well, that's unique to you.

Whether every service provider offers you the options or says 'one size only' - well, thats commercial reality and remains to be seen and published.

So now you're advised - as you would expect - you can make your own guess as to how much. Just remember, all rates are being determined based on what is current in 2011, not what it cost to put copper in the ground in 1963.

A




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Antonios K

 

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  #516453 4-Sep-2011 14:35
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You don't need to put all your computer gear near the fibre entry point, but you need a wiring closet/cabinet somewhere convenient nearby thats easy to get telecoms cable to. It contains a patch panel and Ethernet router/home gateway, but computers only plug into the outlets instead of a router sitting near the computers. Because theres no more ADSL, your Ethernet network will only connect 1 device per outlet unless you can find some G.hn gear so thats why its point-to-point "star" wiring.

To minimise any potential for problems on the telecom cabling, they might not like running outdoor cable through the ceiling. I know lots of places have a garage behind the house and no obvious place for a telecom cabinet, hope you can find a solution. Maybe there is a cupboard somewhere suitable...




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

 
 
 
 


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  #524010 21-Sep-2011 12:31
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I've visited a few different FTTH subdivisions and the termination of the fibre depends entirely on the house setup.  For example the majority of FTTH houses in Papatoetoe have the fibre terminated in the garage, while at Mt Roskill this isn't an option & you'll find a utility room up or downstairs.  

It seems the installers are fairly flexible as to where the fibre can be terminated.  As long as you meet the the minimum cabling requirements from the Brightspark website, it should ensure your house is fully setup to be UFB/FTTH capable. 

Below are the minimum cabling requirement from the Brightspark website.  On this website you'll find all you need to know about the current FTTH (Fibre to the Home) installations, which will translate quite nicely to the UFB.


MINIMUM COMMUNICATION CABLING
REQUIREMENTS

Following are the minimum cable installation requirements we
recommend for new homes and major renovations for which
there is an opportunity to install new wiring:

1. Cabling must be ’star wired’. Telecommunications cables
need to be a minimum specification of Cat5e (UTP). RF
video distribution cables need to be a minimum
specification of tri-Shield RG6 Coax.

2. A home distributor (star wiring box) needs to be located
at a ‘star point’ - to provide for the interconnection and
distribution of cabling around the home, as well as for
testing capability. It is the homeowner or builder’s
responsibility to supply the home distributor, a patch
panel, and patch cords.

3. The home distributor should be easily accessible and
above the height of the External Termination Point (ETP)
to minimise the risk of water entering the premises. It is
typically located at about eye level on the inside of a
home's external wall in a garage or utility room.

4. The home distributor must be large enough - with
minimum dimensions of 350mm (W) x 700mm (H) x
80mm (D) - to house devices such as a router and video
splitter. It must also have integrated power sockets for
these devices. A dual power outlet is recommended.

5. The door on the home distributor must be louvered so
air can circulate and prevent the equipment from
overheating.

6. Three Cat5e cables must be fed from the star point,
through the wall to the ETP, leaving at least 500mm of
cable slack at the ETP and at least 1000mm of slack at
the home distributor.

7. This cabling must be protected within a short length of
plastic pipe – minimum of 20mm diameter and 300mm
90 degree bend up into the home distributor. Do not use an
elbow bend.

8. At the home distributor, all Cat5e cables should ideally
be terminated on keystone RJ45 type modular sockets
mounted in a patch panel. This will allow for very simple
patching to/from routers and easy replacement if any
develop a fault.







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