Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




497 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 3


Topic # 242696 9-Nov-2018 19:43
Send private message quote this post

I've just plugged my Samsung TV into my laptop. The screen resolutions don't fit. The largest is slightly big, the corners of my browsers are off the screen while anything smaller leaves black space around the edge.

 

I assume i'll need to do a custom size? any idea what this will be and is this correct?


Create new topic
3100 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1570


  Reply # 2122939 9-Nov-2018 19:48
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Does your TV have screen resolution options?   Mine have "fill" or "best fit" options in the TV menu.  





Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



4305 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 85

Moderator
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2122944 9-Nov-2018 20:01
Send private message quote this post

My Sony display also has a display area setting of, full pixel, normal or -1.

 
 
 
 


Go Hawks!
895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 54

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2123001 9-Nov-2018 21:27
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Check to see if your display driver has an overscan option, and try toggling that.

6351 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1106

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2123002 9-Nov-2018 21:29
Send private message quote this post

Yep, definitely sounds like overscan. This could also be an option on the TV, not the PC.


472 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 214


  Reply # 2123065 9-Nov-2018 23:46
Send private message quote this post

As others have said, this is overscan.

Dates back to tube TV's, VHS etc. The edge bits of the image a thrown away as the edge of the tube produced a lower quality image. VHS put audio data into the bottom edge of the video.

In the modern day, it turns out that tv shoppers in the showroom perfer a slightly cropped, slightly blurry, larger image, than a true 1:1 pixel representation, so over-scan tends to remain on by default.

Most modern TV's allow you to turn this off, but many older TV's do not.


21626 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4437

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2123068 9-Nov-2018 23:55
Send private message quote this post

Its left on because broadcasters cant manage to not put random junk at the top of the screen when moving video data thru their archaic systems. The fact that it is on is why they insist on putting sports scores and other things so far into the picture that it just looks stupid with overscan turned off.

 

Just another way that the legacy broadcasting industry is holding things back like when they clung onto 4:3 safe areas for decades after widescreen became a thing.





Richard rich.ms

6351 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1106

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2123100 10-Nov-2018 08:16
Send private message quote this post

richms: Just another way that the legacy broadcasting industry is holding things back like when they clung onto 4:3 safe areas for decades after widescreen became a thing.

 

The other day I was reading a forum post from someone that worked on high-DPI support for an operating system back in either 1994 or 96; he commented that resolutions had been steadily increasing, so they worked on making the OS work well with high-res screens. As the resolution increases, you can make the UI elements larger so that you get better fidelity without things becoming tiny.

 

Little did they know that the industry as a whole would get to 1920x1080 and then get stuck there for a decade.


Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.