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87 posts

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Topic # 127498 12-Aug-2013 23:00
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Hi all,

I have recently installed a small network using Cat 5e solid core cable from a 12 port patch panel to RJ45 sockets around the house. I have used a proper punch down 110 tool, and configured to 568a. I have done my level best to keep the twisted pair right up to the termination point and minimum unsheathed, following excellent advice on these forums.

If I plug in my laptop on every connection it tells me that it can connect at full duplex 1000mbps mtu 1500 (although on some it also tells me flow control, whatever that is) .

Can I assume that I have done it all correctly, or would there be any value in getting someone to run a cable tester over it as well?

Many thanks

Peter

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  Reply # 876205 13-Aug-2013 04:56
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If they are all working at 1Gbit it sounds like it's all good.

A basic cable tester is <$50 from Jaycar if you want to double check or there's a more expensive one
http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=XC5076
http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=XC5078

BTR

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  Reply # 876221 13-Aug-2013 07:46
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Sounds like you have done a good tidy job, if all of the sockets are working then I would sit back and enjoy your work.

For a small home network there is no much point testing unless you are having problems, If you do decide to test so if you can borrow a tester rather than paying some to come out and test them.

There might even be a GZ member in your area happy lend you a tester.


Well done

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  Reply # 876245 13-Aug-2013 08:57
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Sorry for the hijack, but I've been giving thought to installing (or getting installed) a proper wired network in my own house, so it's interesting to read about someone else doing it.

I don't have any experience with cabling and wiring, so I'd be interested to learn more about your project, and your level of experience prior to the job. Would you be interested in posting a project log (with pictures) to describe how you went about it, and what things to look out for? I know I'd find it interesting and helpful, and there are bound to be others also interested. I don't know whether I'd actually have the confidence to have a go myself, but it's always better to see someone else's work, to get an idea whether it's something I could manage.

Alternatively, can anyone recommend someone in the Palmerston North area that I could engage to install a small wired home network? My google searches to date only turn up what appear to be commercial installers...



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 876743 13-Aug-2013 21:00
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This was the most basic network I could think of, trying to save money etc. I have foregone all the rack mount cabinets etc. it only does a basic star LAN, feeding off my UFB router, to some AirPort Extreme and express locations to achieve broad house coverage, as well as some future proofing connections to behind the TV, and a direct connection to our main desktop computer. I used PDL faceplates to match the rest of the house (Corys electrical) and then pretty much everything else came from Cables Direct. Get comfortable with scrabbling around under your floorboards! I am lucky that we have a split level house, so access underneath was not too bad.

I had no prior experience but just read lots of posts on this forum. Here is a good one for starters.

http://www.geekzone.co.nz/sbiddle/4511

Cheers

Peter

PS I will post some photos shortly




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 876759 13-Aug-2013 21:11
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Here are the images







As you can see - nothing fancy here!

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  Reply # 876836 14-Aug-2013 07:14
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^^^

Looks good. I've done a similar thing in my house. Most of my cables run thru the crawl space, I used steel wires to suspend them there.

I'll try uploading an image later. GZ images isn't working at all right now.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


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  Reply # 876880 14-Aug-2013 08:56
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Thanks PJ for the images. From what I can make out, you run a Cat5 cable from the UFB modem (looks like Telecom, going by the logo) to the patch panel, and then you simply have cables running from the patch panel through to each of the different locations, terminated with a PDL faceplate. Would that be about right? I've always wondered about patch panels, and thought they were complicated, but this would suggest that they are little more than an advanced splitter, sending the broadband signal down the different cables. Is there any software or configuration required, or is it just simply plug 'n' play?

The problem I face is that there's very little space under our house, and I'm not too fond of cramped spaces. Hence why I'm wondering whether there's someone in PN who I can pay to do the dirty work... ;)



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 876933 14-Aug-2013 10:04
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Actually a patch panel is just a way of neatly terminating all the different house outlets at a single junction box. The advanced splitter that you refer to is actually called a network switch, where you have one cable going in and multiple cables coming out. The Telecom supplied UFB router essentially has a 4 port switch built in, and the AirPort Extreme you can see in the photo has a 3 port switch built in, so that gives me 6 free outlets to patch into the patch panel, without having to pay for another network switch. That black cable you can see at the top is actually a Cat 6 20m long patch cable that runs into the roof space to a high mounted AirPort Extreme to achieve good house coverage, and the blue one is the return patch cable that allows me to use one of the "switched outlets" in that roof mounted Airport as well. You can buy separate network switches, but with judicious use of existing equipment I have managed to avoid doing that. Because we also run Airplay into stereos in three rooms as well, the Apple environment just seems to make it all work.

Cheers

Peter

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  Reply # 877040 14-Aug-2013 11:46
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Lizard1977: Thanks PJ for the images. From what I can make out, you run a Cat5 cable from the UFB modem (looks like Telecom, going by the logo) to the patch panel, and then you simply have cables running from the patch panel through to each of the different locations, terminated with a PDL faceplate. Would that be about right? I've always wondered about patch panels, and thought they were complicated, but this would suggest that they are little more than an advanced splitter, sending the broadband signal down the different cables. Is there any software or configuration required, or is it just simply plug 'n' play?

The problem I face is that there's very little space under our house, and I'm not too fond of cramped spaces. Hence why I'm wondering whether there's someone in PN who I can pay to do the dirty work... ;)


I'd be prepared to do the dirty work for you (I say that sight unseen! LOL.) Flick me a message and we can talk if you're agreeable.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


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  Reply # 880576 18-Aug-2013 15:23
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A tester will only test continuity (i.e. confirm that the pinout is correct), and if you're certain of that anyway (and not having any trouble) I wouldn't bother.

If you could get hold of a Fluke DTX-1800 or similar this will tell you if your install actually conforms to the Cat5e or Cat6 standard, and produce nice pretty PDFs detailing all of the cable's characteristics, but if you have to pay to rent one (hundreds per day) then it's probably not worthwhile for a home network.

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