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Topic # 127505 13-Aug-2013 06:11
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Our Win 2011 server has the IPV4 ethernet card DNS settings set to its own IP address , so IP address of the server is 192.168.1.2, gateway is 192.168.1.1 (Firewall/router), and preferred DNS server is also 192.168.1.2.

Is this normal for a server or should it be set to the DNS of our ISP? Its been that way since it was set up, and we do seem to have the odd issue with DNS.

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mjb

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  Reply # 876220 13-Aug-2013 07:36
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Usually, yes - if that machine is running a DNS server. (Although, 127.0.0.1 is also common)

Your DNS Server will either be configured as a recursive server, or a caching server. The former will look up a DNS record for you from scratch, and the latter will just ask another recursive server for results (Your ISP servers for example).

Your server should only answer recursive queries on the LAN interface, and not to internet clients. (The only queries it should respond to on the internet would be when it's authoritative for a domain).




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  Reply # 876230 13-Aug-2013 07:59
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As above, if your server is running DNS, it shouldn't be a problem, provided it's configured correctly. If it's not running DNS, and that's the only DNS server it's interface is referencing.. name resolution just won't be working.




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  Reply # 876231 13-Aug-2013 08:01
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Hi, yep and depending on the router/firewall it may cache DNS request and/or proxy the requests on behalf of the internal hosts.

Cyril



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  Reply # 876238 13-Aug-2013 08:36
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Thanks gentlemen.

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  Reply # 876294 13-Aug-2013 09:58
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If the server is running DNS then you should setup your ISPs DNS server in the Forwarding settings otherwise it will be using root hints which can be slow.






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  Reply # 876320 13-Aug-2013 10:29
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CYaBro: If the server is running DNS then you should setup your ISPs DNS server in the Forwarding settings otherwise it will be using root hints which can be slow.


Is this under forward lookup zones under the server DNS settings?

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  Reply # 876326 13-Aug-2013 10:34
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kiwitrc:
CYaBro: If the server is running DNS then you should setup your ISPs DNS server in the Forwarding settings otherwise it will be using root hints which can be slow.


Is this under forward lookup zones under the server DNS settings?


No, you want to go to the properties of the DNS server, and go to the Forwarders tab, assuming you're using the Windows DNS MMC.

Forward lookup zones are zones for which your DNS server will do a local forward lookup. This would typically only include your internal domain, and any domain for which your server is authoritative, though there are a few other situations where it can be used.




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