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Topic # 128677 19-Aug-2013 15:51
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Hi all,

I just had cable internet through Vodafone installed today - Warp speed 100/10mbps plan

I get very good speeds when connecting my laptop directly to the cable modem (as per the Vodafone speed test), but once i hook up my wireless router, the speed drops to around 40/10mbps (laptop connected to router via cable), or 20/10mbps (laptop connected wireless to router).

The router is a Cisco Linksys E1000 running DD-WRT v24-sp2. I disabled QOS which had no effect.

Any help would really be appreciated.

Cheers guys

Joe




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  Reply # 881087 19-Aug-2013 15:54
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You should be getting better performance that this on Ethernet - there isn't any reason why you shouldn't get 90Mbps based on a quick Google search of the router performance.

20Mbps for wireless sounds about right depending on the device you're connecting and your RF conditions.




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  Reply # 881090 19-Aug-2013 16:05
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sbiddle: You should be getting better performance that this on Ethernet - there isn't any reason why you shouldn't get 90Mbps based on a quick Google search of the router performance.

20Mbps for wireless sounds about right depending on the device you're connecting and your RF conditions.


My network adapter in my laptop is 802.11n, it should be capable of up to 300mb/s speed right? I'm sure the Linksys router should be able to handle more than 20mbps (i'm sitting right next to it), one of its "key features" is transfer speed up to 300mbps for wireless devices?...is there any setting i can check?

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  Reply # 881097 19-Aug-2013 16:21
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joepenman:
My network adapter in my laptop is 802.11n, it should be capable of up to 300mb/s speed right? And i'm pretty sure the Linksys router should be able to handle more than 20mbps (i'm sitting right next to it)...is there any setting i can check?


Throw theoretical wifi speeds out the window once it's in a real-world environment ;) and the base n standard is up to 150Mbps - but n supports up to 4 streams, giving up to N600 performance. Bear in mind the key phrase "up to". You might get 60 - 80 Mbps throughput on the wifi on the E1000 if you're using 40Mhz channel width with minimal interference sources.

But, your ethernet speed should be pretty close to your 100/10 connection. I would be curious as to whether the E1000 with stock firmware has the same issue - I've got a couple of them floating around and they can certainly manage at least 85 - 90Mbps throughput WAN-to-LAN in each direction concurrently. I have not tried DD-WRT on this particular router, though.




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  Reply # 881102 19-Aug-2013 16:28
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joepenman:
sbiddle: You should be getting better performance that this on Ethernet - there isn't any reason why you shouldn't get 90Mbps based on a quick Google search of the router performance.

20Mbps for wireless sounds about right depending on the device you're connecting and your RF conditions.


My network adapter in my laptop is 802.11n, it should be capable of up to 300mb/s speed right? I'm sure the Linksys router should be able to handle more than 20mbps (i'm sitting right next to it), one of its "key features" is transfer speed up to 300mbps for wireless devices?...is there any setting i can check?


That's not quite how it works. That's a maximum physical link layer speed - It's not a real world speed. It's also a maximum using UDP rather than your speedtest which is probably TCP so speed is a lot less since WiFi is half duplex.



Here's some testing from smallnetbuilder

Average wireless throughput ranked the E1000 in the middle of the pack for single-band N routers running 20 MHz mode downlink at 27.2 Mbps and a bit higher running uplink at 32.2 Mbps



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  Reply # 881105 19-Aug-2013 16:40
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sbiddle:
joepenman:
sbiddle: You should be getting better performance that this on Ethernet - there isn't any reason why you shouldn't get 90Mbps based on a quick Google search of the router performance.

20Mbps for wireless sounds about right depending on the device you're connecting and your RF conditions.


My network adapter in my laptop is 802.11n, it should be capable of up to 300mb/s speed right? I'm sure the Linksys router should be able to handle more than 20mbps (i'm sitting right next to it), one of its "key features" is transfer speed up to 300mbps for wireless devices?...is there any setting i can check?


That's not quite how it works. That's a maximum physical link layer speed - It's not a real world speed. It's also a maximum using UDP rather than your speedtest which is probably TCP so speed is a lot less since WiFi is half duplex.



Here's some testing from smallnetbuilder

Average wireless throughput ranked the E1000 in the middle of the pack for single-band N routers running 20 MHz mode downlink at 27.2 Mbps and a bit higher running uplink at 32.2 Mbps


Thanks for your answers guys. It seems like if i want to get any better performance for wireless, i need to upgrade my router :)

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  Reply # 881108 19-Aug-2013 16:43
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It really depends what sort of performance you're expecting and your RF environment.

If things aren't too noisy you could try 40MHz mode which will give you speeds mentioned above, but if you're only getting 20Mbps now you're potentially in a noisy environment so may not see significant gains.



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  Reply # 881145 19-Aug-2013 18:10
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sbiddle: It really depends what sort of performance you're expecting and your RF environment.

If things aren't too noisy you could try 40MHz mode which will give you speeds mentioned above, but if you're only getting 20Mbps now you're potentially in a noisy environment so may not see significant gains.


I tried 40mhz mode but the performance was relatively the same. I am in a block of flats, i can pick up 6 different networks which probably have multiple devices connected to them, im guessing this is the cause of the noisy environment you're talking about.

Can you recommend a wireless router that has decent wireless downlink/uplink speeds for sub $200?

I spent a bit of time of smallnetbuilder and came across this one: http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/31834-asus-ea-n66-dual-band-wireless-n900-gigabit-ethernet-adapter-reviewed

Not sure if it is what i need or if it would even work with my cable modem though?

Cheers for your time

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  Reply # 881166 19-Aug-2013 19:10
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It seems that apartment dwellers need to turn their apartments into faraday cages if they want decent WIFI.




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  Reply # 881227 19-Aug-2013 20:48
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Not just apartment dwellers, even in urban environments the neighbours network will be strong enough to cause your devices to back off transmisttion and wait.

Really needs to be tunable so I can set it to just ignore anything below -70 to -75as being a competing transmission and talk over it. If I have some stuff moving over the bridge between the shed and the house on CH1 (40MHz wide) it will totally cripple the network in the house on CH11 (also 40MHz, so overlapping on ch6) - despite the shed and garage AP's that are used showing up at -80ish dB in the house, so not actually usable.




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  Reply # 881289 19-Aug-2013 22:44
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Hi. I have the Thomson modem/router that came with telecom subscription. I have recently bought s denon avr2313 and am having no luck with AirPlay. Keeps dropping out. Am thinking its the modem and am keen to replace it but......it's a bit mind boggling all the choice. + there's always someone recommending a modem another bags.

Appreciate some help.

We've a laptop, a couple of iPhones, iPad, Samsung tablet, skype camera and Internet tv as well as the denon avr network receiver. Really want a stable connection - and airplay to work!

Any suggestions on modem/router.

Thanks

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  Reply # 881645 20-Aug-2013 16:30
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Elviswosere: Hi. I have the Thomson modem/router that came with telecom subscription. I have recently bought s denon avr2313 and am having no luck with AirPlay. Keeps dropping out. Am thinking its the modem and am keen to replace it but......it's a bit mind boggling all the choice. + there's always someone recommending a modem another bags.

Appreciate some help.

We've a laptop, a couple of iPhones, iPad, Samsung tablet, skype camera and Internet tv as well as the denon avr network receiver. Really want a stable connection - and airplay to work!

Any suggestions on modem/router.

Thanks


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